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Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 10, 2018

[IgG4-related gastropathy mimicking malignancy]

NAGY Pál, KASZÁS Ilona, PÁK Gábor, TIBA Imre, FELFÖLDI Éva, HAMVAS József, BAGDI Enikő, KRENÁCS László

[The Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) along with its synonyms is recently a popular topic in the medical literature. This illness can affect almost every organ in the body therefore it is frequently discussed in any type of interdisciplinary forums. We presented an instructive case of IgG4-RD with gastric involvement in 2016. Hereby we share our pertinent experiences. We are not dealing with the IgG4-RD in general including its terminology problems, epidemiology, pathogenesis, detailed clinical/pathological appearances, diagnostic criteria and treatment. A 63-year-old male presented with symp­toms of pylorus stenosis. The endoscopic findings and CT images were interpreted as those of a malignant tumour in the antrum of the stomach. So a subtotal resection was performed although the biopsy showed reactive proliferation of plasma cells without evidence of malignancy. Pathological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed an IgG4- associated sclerosing inflammation. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Our case is an example of rare, isolated formof IgG4-RD. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 20, 2017

[Plasmaferesis for the treatment of acute pancreatitis related to extreme hypertriglyceridemia]

BELOPOTOCZKY Gábor, ORENTSÁK Áron, PÁRTOS Gergely, ARÁNYI József, HARIS Ágnes, PENYIGE József, SIKE Róbert, DEMETER Pál

[We present the case of a 43-year-od wo­man, with pancreatitis related to extreme - higher than 100 mmol/L - secondary hy­pertriglyceridemia. Fast clinical improvement and rapid regression of pancreatitis were achieved by appropriate therapy of pancreatitis, the diabetic metabolic disturbance, correcting microcirculation and treating hypertriglyceridemia with plasmapheresis. The authors underline, that the complex therapeutic approach and early plasmapheresis in pancreatitis related to hypertriglyceridemia may prevent necrosis and more severe, even fatal, outcome of the disease. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

OCTOBER 20, 2013

[Therapeutic apheresis in pediatry]

TÚRI Sándor, BERECKI Csaba, HASZON Ibolya, PAPP Ferenc

[The possible mechanisms of therapeutic plasma mexchange: 1. the removal of circulatory plasma factor (anti Gbm disease, myasthenia gravis, Guillain Barré syndrome), 2. monoclonal antibody (Waldenström macroglobulinemia, myeloma protein), 3. circulatory immuncomplexes cryoglobulinaemia, myeloma protein, SLE), 4. alloantibody, 5. toxic factor, 6. replacement of a specific plasma factor, 7. a repear of the function of reticulo-endothelial system, 8. the removal of the inflammatory mediators, 9. the changes of the ratio of antigen-antibody which makes immuncomplexes more soluble, 10 stimulation of lymphocyte clones for supporting the cytotoxic therapy. Indications of emergency plasmapheresis: 1. Goodpasture syndrome with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and hemoptoe, 2. hyperviscosity syndrome, 3. TTP/HUS, 4. High level of factor VIII inhibitor, 5. respiratory insufficiency Guillain-Barré syndrome, 6. myasthenia gravis, 7. acute mushroom intoxication, or protein bound toxins. Further indications for plasmapheresis: 8. cryoglobulinemia, 9. other cases of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (when steroid+ cyclophosphamide are ineffective), 10. Wegener granulomatosis, 11. polyarteritis nodosa, 12. systemic lupus erythematosus (when steroid and cyclophosphamid therapy is not effective or associated with cerebral vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome combined with bleeding and thrombosis), 13. focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (resistant for therapy), 14. acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, 15. acute vascular rejection, 16. rheumatoid arthritis systemic type, 17. hypertrigliceridemia (≥25 mM), 18. thyreotoxic crisis, 19. acute necrotizing pancreatitis, 20. acute fulminant hepatitis, 21. paraquat intoxication, 22. snake bite (when antiserum is unavailable), 23. drug intoxication.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

FEBRUARY 20, 2009

[Treatment of acute pancreatitis, with special regard to pharmaceutical therapy]

DÖBRÖNTE Zoltán

[Treatment of acute pancreatitis is mainly supportive, including the correction of any factors causing or sustaining the disease process, efforts to limit complications, as well as treatment of complications. Pharmaceutical efforts to influence the pathophysiological events with protease inhibitors or by influencing the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine cascade did not prove to be effective, so there is no known effective and specific drug therapy for clinical use. Adequate pain control is an important component of pharmaceutical management, and - although yet controversial - early antibiotic prophylaxis and effective antimicrobial treatment of the inflammatory complications (infected necrosis or fluid collection, SIRS, sepsis) have probably a determining role in the outcome of severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Carbapenems proved to be the most potent antibiotics. For the prevention of the not infrequent fungal superinfection in acute pancreatitis, early administration of fluconasole can also decrease mortality. Surgery is indicated in the first stage of infected necrosis and infected pancreatic and peripancreatic fluid collections. In certain patients with a high operative risk, endoscopic or percutaneous drainage with lavage can also be worth trying. Optimal conditions for the treatment of severe necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as adequate management of multiple organ failure can only be warranted at an intensive care unit. In the chemoprevention of pancreatitis complicating endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs promise a new therapeutic option. There are insufficient data about the beneficial effects of the protease inhibitor ulinastatin, and results with nitroglycerin are contradictory.]

Hungarian Radiology

DECEMBER 15, 2008

[Radiology of pancreas: review from the last year - Gastro Update 2007]

FORRAI Gábor

[PURPOSE - To demonstrate the recent results in radiological diagnostics of pancreas, and the actual place of the imaging and interventional methods. METHOD - Systematic review of the most recent articles from the last year in the following subjects: acute, chronic and autoimmune pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and other tumors, PET and special imaging problems in pancreas transplantation. RESULTS - Annually, experience in pancreatic diagnostical methods are accumulating rapidly. Therefore, there is a continuous change in the examination algorithm with new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities making their way into the daily routine. Some of the algorithms become obsolete within a few years and their further application is considered mismanagement. Some other methods become obligatory steps in the diagnostics. These are the reasons why up-to-date knowledge of the literature is mandatory.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

FEBRUARY 22, 2007

[THE ROLE OF ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN PANCREATIC DISEASES ASSOCIATED WITH MALDIGESTION]

TAKÁCS Tamás

[The pancreas synthesizes and secretes more than 20 digestive enzymes that hydrolyze the major nutritive components, i.e., carbohydrates, fat and protein, within the lumen of the small bowel. In several pancreatic diseases the secretory capacity of the pancreas gradually decreases and the release of pancreatic juice becomes blocked resulting in the characteristic symptoms of maldigestion. Pancreas-associated maldigestion is most often caused by chronic pancreatitis, which can be diagnosed primarily by imaging beside history and clinical symptoms. There is no decisive serological test. The goal of the treatment of pancreatic insufficiency is to reduce symptoms (bloating, abdominal pain, weight loss, and, most importantly, steatorrhea) and improve digestion. One way to do this is to replace pancreatic enzymes. The efficiency of the available enzyme preparations can be increased by the improvement of lipase activity.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

AUGUST 12, 2009

[TREATMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS, WITH SPECIAL REGARD TO PHARMACEUTICAL THERAPY]

DÖBRÖNTE Zoltán

[Treatment of acute pancreatitis is mainly supportive, including the correction of any factors causing or sustaining the disease process, efforts to limit complications, as well as treatment of complications. Pharmaceutical efforts to influence the pathophysiological events with protease inhibitors or by influencing the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine cascade did not prove to be effective, so there is no known effective and specific drug therapy for clinical use. Adequate pain control is an important component of pharmaceutical management, and - although yet controversial - early antibiotic prophylaxis and effective antimicrobial treatment of the inflammatory complications (infected necrosis or fluid collection, SIRS, sepsis) have probably a determining role in the outcome of severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Carbapenems proved to be the most potent antibiotics. For the prevention of the not infrequent fungal superinfection in acute pancreatitis, early administration of fluconasole can also decrease mortality. Surgery is indicated in the first stage of infected necrosis and infected pancreatic and peripancreatic fluid collections. In certain patients with a high operative risk, endoscopic or percutaneous drainage with lavage can also be worth trying. Optimal conditions for the treatment of severe necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as adequate management of multiple organ failure can only be warranted at an intensive care unit. In the chemoprevention of pancreatitis complicating endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs promise a new therapeutic option. There are insufficient data about the beneficial effects of the protease inhibitor ulinastatin, and results with nitroglycerin are contradictory.]

Hungarian Radiology

APRIL 20, 2003

[The role of the mechanical lithotripsy for the treatment of ”difficult” common bile duct stones]

OROSZ Péter, NAGY György, SÜMEGI János, JUHÁSZ László

[INTRODUCTION - Present work aimed to identify some predictors of success or failure (gender, age, number and size of stones, presence of periampullary diverticula and jaundice) in mechanical lithotripsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS - 7998 endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatographies, 2430 endoscopic sphincterotomies and 1205 bile duct stone extractions were performed between 1981 and 2000 years. In 159 patients - because of failure of standard techniques - mechanical lithotripsy was attempted for crushing of large bile duct stones. There were 39 men (mean age 70.5 years) and 120 women (mean age 67.7 years). 65 patients had single stone, 31 had 2 stones and 63 had multiple stones. 80 patients had larger stones than 20 mm in diameter. 23 patients had periampullary diverticula and 98 were jaundiced. Mechanical lithotripsy was accomplished with Olympus BML 2Q and BML 4Q intraendoscopic systems. When the first attempt failed, repeated treatment was performed or a Wilson-Cook extraendoscopic system was used. Data of predictors were processed using univariate analysis, Chi-square test and Fischer’s exact test. P<0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. RESULTS - Clearance of common bile duct was obtained in 130 patients (81.8%). Procedure related cholangitis occured in 16 patients. 8 pancreatitis developed, 7 of them subsided with conservative therapy, 1 of them required surgical treatment. On univariate analysis, the stone size was the only variable to differentiate the success from failure of procedure (p<0.05). Other variables had not any role in determining the outcome. CONCLUSION - Mechanical lithotripsy is a useful method with a high success rate and with an acceptable complication rate for treatment of ”difficult” bile duct stones. Stone size is the single outcome predictor.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JUNE 21, 2006

[AUTOIMMUNE PANCREATITIS - AN UNDERDIAGNOSED DISEASE?]

CZAKÓ László

[Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently recognized type of chronic pancreatitis that is clearly distinct from alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Its clinical symptoms include jaundice, abdominal pain, weight loss and diabetes mellitus. It may be associated with other autoimmune diseases. IgG levels are elevated and autoantibodies can be detected. Pancreatic imaging reveals a diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. The characteristic histological features are lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis. Autoimmune pancreatitis responds dramatically to steroid therapy, in contrast to other types of chronic pancreatitis, which hardly respond to any of the various therapies. It is important to be aware of this disease because it may be mistaken for other forms of chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer, which leads to pancreatic resection when steroid treatment would be sufficient. This review discusses the clinical, laboratory, histological and imaging findings that are seen in autoimmune pancreatitis with particular focus on diagnosis. With the improvement of the diagnostic work-up less unnecessary pancreatic resections are expected to happen in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis.]