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Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

[The propagation and semiology of focal epileptic seizures. case presentations to the insula. theoretical considerations]

BALOGH Attila, BALOGH Attila ifj.

[Study objectives – The developing of diagnostical examinations in epileptology provides new challenges in seizure semiology. On the analysis of seizures it is important to examine the mechanisms of their propagation. The brain connectivity (based on the neuroimaging), the shadowing of the movement of excessive neuronal activity (based on computerized EEG and MEG methods), the cognition of the physiological and pathological brain networks are the foot- stone of the epileptic seizure propagation. The investigators prove, by means of case demonstrations of the role of the network nodes and the role of the epileptic hubs in the seizure symptomatology. Methods – The preoperative, intra and postoperative data are analised of three insular and one parietal epileptic patients in point of view of their seizure symptomes. Complex neuroimaging, noninvasive and invasive electrophysiology, intensive long-term video-EEG monitoring, computerized EEG analysis, fuctional mapping, intraoperative corticography were used. The etiology were confirmed with hystology. Results – It is observed that on seizure semiology our patients plays the insula a double role. In some cases, it is the focus of insular seizures with their symptoms difficult to identify. However, in the majority of cases and as a consequence of its rich neural connections, the insula has a peculiar property in the evolution of the symptomatogenic features of seizures. This observations are developing new relationships between the mechanism of seizure propagation and its semiological consequences. Conclusions – On epileptological point of view there are brain structures which has peculiar role in the „designe” of propagation of the epileptic excitement. The numerous new methods in neuroimaging and neurophysiology allowed the connectomical examination of the epileptic networks. The role of the epileptic diathesis is approachable with the metholdology of the brain connectivity. Theoretically the node of the epileptic network consist of the potential pathes where the localised excessive excitement can propagete. The route where the actual seizure can go adhead is determined by the actual edpileptic propensity of the above mentioned potential pathes.]

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[Liquid biopsy in clinical oncology – fine-tuning precision medicine]

PRISKIN Katalin, PINTÉR Lajos, JAKSA Gábor, PÓLYA Sára, KAHÁN Zsuzsa, SÜKÖSD Farkas, HARACSKA Lajos

[The classical method of genetically characterising a tumour requires tissue biopsy with which a small sample is removed from the affected organ. This sample represents the tumour in the further analyses. However, the localised nature of sample collection limits representative characterisation. The so-called circulating tumour DNA, isolated from blood plasma after a simple sample collection, potentially enables the oncological analysis of all tumour tissues carrying genetic alterations that can be identifi ed as markers. In order to maximally exploit the potentials of circulating tumour DNA, we must adjust the analytical tools to its specifi c features. The preanalytical handling and storage of the sample signifi cantly infl uences its further usability. In order to be able to detect a potential mutation in a mostly wild-type background, the development of new, specifi c methods is needed, most of which are based on next-generation sequencing techniques. In the past decades, the pronounced decrease in the costs of such techniques led to an accumulation of an immense amount of genetic information on tumorigenesis. Due to the development of sequencing technologies, the turnaround times of tests also decreased enabling their employment in routine care besides research. Starting from our research, this can be realised via three approaches: technological development, the implementation of our already existing diagnostic methods in liquid biopsy, and the construction of well-planned disease-specifi c gene panels. Based on international trends and our experience in serum diagnostics, we are certain that liquid biopsy will become a central pillar of oncological screening and precision oncology in the near future.]

Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 05, 2017

[Current treatment therapy of prostate cancer]

KULLMANN Tamás, KOCSIS Károly, SZEPESVÁRY Zsolt

[Prostate cancer is a frequent and usually slowly progressing malignancy. Promising opportunities and risks to avoid may occur along its diagnosis and treatment. The chance of early detection is high. The localised disease can be cured by radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy with equal probability. The post-prostatectomy biochemical failure may be controlled by radiotherapy. Even oligometastatic tumours can be cured by harmonised local treatment modalities. The survival of metastatic disease can be prolonged by several years. Effi cacy of traditional androgen deprivation may be enhanced with completion by upfront docetaxel chemotherapy or androgen synthesis blocking agents. However, local and systemic treatments are not harmless. Overtreatment as well as undertreatment has to be avoided upon therapy planning.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2015

[Treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture with PMMA augmented pedicle screw fixation]

PADÁNYI Csaba, MISIK Ferenc, PAPP Zoltán, VITANOVICS Dusan, BALOGH Attila, VERES Róbert, LIPÓTH László, BANCZEROWSKI Péter

[Background - Over the last few decades many innovative operation technique were developed due to the increase of porotic vertebral fractures. These new techniques aim to reach the required stability of the vertebral column. In case of significant instability, spinal canal stenosis or neural compression, decompressive intervention may be necessary, which results in further weakening of the column of the spine, the minimal invasive percutan vertebroplasty is not an adequate method to reach the required stability, that is why insertion of complementary pedicular screws is needed. Considering the limited screw-fixing ability of the porotic bone structure, with this new technique we are able to reach the appropriate stability of cement-augmented pedicle screws by dosing cement carefully through the screws into the vertebral body. We used this technique in our Institute in case of 12 patients and followed up the required stability and the severity of complications. Methods - Fifteen vertebral compression fractures of 12 patients were treated in our Institute. Using the classification proposed by Genant et al. we found that the severity of the vertebral compression was grade 3 in case of 13, while grade 2 in case of two fractures. The average follow up time of the patients was 22 months (12-39), during this period X-ray, CT and clinical control examinations were taken. During the surgery the involved segments were localised by using X-ray and after the exploration the canulated screws were put through the pedicles of the spine and the vertebral body was filled through the transpedicular screws with bone cement. Depending on the grade of the spinal canal stenosis, we made the decompression, vertebroplasty or corpectomy of the fractured vertebral body, and the replacement of the body. Finally the concerned segments were fixed by titanium rods. Results - In all cases the stenosis of spinal canal was resolved and the bone cement injected into the corpus resulted in adequated stability of the spine. In case of six patients we observed cement extravasation without any clinical signs, and by one patient - as a serious complication - pulmonary embolism. Neurological progression or screw loosening were not detected during the follow up period. Part of the patients had residual disability after the surgery due to their older ages and the problem of their rehabilitation process. Conclusion - After the right consideration of indications, age, general health condition and the chance of successful rehabilitation, the technique appears to be safe for the patients. With the use of this surgical method, the stability of the spine can be improved compared to the preoperative condition, the spinal canal stenosis can be solved and the neural structures can be decompressed. The severity of complications can be reduced by a precise surgical technique and the careful use of the injected cement. The indication of the surgical method needs to be considered in the light of the expected outcome and the rehabilitation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2011

[Common variable immunodeficiency with coexisting central nervous system sarcoidosis. Case report and literature review with implications for diagnosis and pathogenesis]

MAGDALENA Dziadzio, HORTOBÁGYI Tibor, DESMOND Kidd, RONNIE Chee

[We describe a patient with a history of longstanding primary generalised epilepsy, on anticonvulsant therapy, who presented with fever, headache, worsening seizures and hallucinations. Among various investigations, the patient had high CSF protein and ACE levels, leptomeningeal nodular enhancement on MRI brain and non-caseating granulomas in the brain and meninges on the biopsy. The patient was diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis. Subsequently, he was found to be panhypogammaglobulinaemic and was diagnosed with probable common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). The coexistence of common variable immunodeficiency and neurosarcoidosis is rare. Typically, non-caseating granulomas in CVID patients are localised in the lymphatic tissue and solid organs. To our knowledge, there are only five reports of the granulomas of the central nervous system (CNS) in CVID. We discuss the diagnostic difficulties in this case and review the literature.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 20, 2007

[NEUROVASCULAR COMPRESSION IN THE MEDULLA OBLONGATA AS A CAUSE OF RESISTANT HYPERTENSION - THOUGHTS APROPOS OF A PATIENT]

KOVÁTS László, BRETUS Angelika, CSUTAK Kinga, NAGY Gyöngyi, GASZTONYI Beáta

[INTRODUCTION - The vasomotor centre, the central regulator of the cardiovascular system, is localised in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata. Irritation of this area and/or of the ninth and tenth cranial nerves (that are involved both in the afferent and efferent pathways of the baroreceptor reflex) causes sympathetic hyperactivity, which in some cases leads to severe resistant hypertension. A common underlying cause of this is pulsatile neurovascular compression, a vascular malformation rarely sought for. CASE REPORT - The authors present the case of a middle-aged woman with what had been considered “essential” hypertension. Magnetic resonance angiography showed vascular compression of the medulla oblongata and the departing left ninth and tenth cranial nerves as the cause of her hypertension. CONCLUSIONS - After a literature review the authors draw the attention to this rarely identified cause of resistant hypertension and to the difficulties of its diagnosis.]

Hungarian Radiology

FEBRUARY 15, 2005

[Solitary fibrous tumor of the chest]

AGÓCS Ágnes, KISHINDI KISS Katalin, PENCS Mónika, TÓTH Tivadar

[INTRODUCTION - Solitary fibrous tumor is a rare, in most of the cases benign tumor of mesenchymal origin arising from the pleura. CASE REPORT - Significantly raised right hemidiaphragm was noted on the chest X-ray of an elderly female patient with good general condition. A large solid mass lesion was seen above the normally positioned right hemidiaphragm on ultrasound and chest CT examinations. The mass was removed by surgical resection and a solitary fibrous tumor was confirmed by histological and immunhistochemical examinations. CONCLUSION - Solitary fibrosus tumor is a rare and histologically benign tumor. Occasionally it may enlarge rapidly and transform into malignant variant after several years. Therefore complete surgical resection and long term follow up is needed in all cases.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 20, 2002

[Localised and generalised osteoporosis in autoimmune polyarthritis]

TÓTH EDIT

[In this article, recent data are summarised on the osteoporosis occurring in autoimmune polyarthritis. Involvement of the bone in patients with autoimmune diseases occurs in two forms: localised (around inflamed joints) and generalised. Paraarticular osteoporosis has been known for a long time but new methods of bone measurements highlight the rate and cause of bone loss. Generalised skeletal changes in rheumatoid arthritis, in systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile chronic arthritis have been proved by epidemiological studies. At present, there is no evidence supporting generalised bone loss in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Despite the fact that clinically apparent osteoporosis in autoimmune diseases is associated with severe health impairment and reduced survival rates, osteoporosis is still underdiagnosed and prophylactic strategies have yet to be found for this group of patients. These facts indicate calling specialists’ attention to the importance of osteoporosis in inflammatory diseases.]

Hungarian Immunology

JUNE 20, 2002

[Ocular myositis]

KISS Emese, FACSKÓ Andrea, DÉVÉNYI Katalin, DANKÓ Katalin, ZEHER Margit

[INTRODUCTION - Dermato-/polymyositis is an autoimmune disorder, which belongs to the idiopathic inflammatory myopaties. It involves skeletal muscles in form of weakness and inflammatory infiltrates. Characteristic skin lesions are present in dermatomyositis. Other organs may also be affected mainly in the presence of myositis specific autoantibodies. The inflammation usually involves the proximal muscles of extremities. CASE REPORT - In the present work we report the case of a 52-year-old woman. In the previous history the removal of rectal adenocarcinoma was remarkable in 1994. After that she received chemotherapy. She complied for severe headache and pain in the right eye in 2000 October, therefore a skull CT was performed, indicating thickening of rectus medalis muscle within orbital cavity. There was an enhancement of contrast material in the muscle. Glaucoma was excluded. Neurologist suspected the presence of myositis and indicated 0.5 mg/kg corticosteroid therapy. Soon after the left eye became painful, but due to the corticosteroid treatment both eyes became painless. A control orbital CT was completely negative in 2000 November. Immunology consultancy revealed a mild proximal muscle atrophy in both lower extremities, but CPK and LDH enzyme levels were normal, EMG was characteristic for mild chronic nerve lesion. The biopsy, taken from the involved proximal muscle of lower extremity, did not show inflammatory infiltration. Complete screening for cancer was negative. Thyroid gland disease could be excluded. Immune laboratory data were negative, autoantibodies, including anti-Jo1, could not be detected. Based on the results a rare disease, ocular myositis was diagnosed. Considering the clinical improvement, the withdrawal of corticosteroid therapy was offered. Stringent immunology and oncology follow-up is required. CONCLUSION - In relation to our case report, we discuss clinical symptoms of orbital myositis, diagnostic procedures to identify the disease and also differential diagnostic considerations.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2010

[How does the brain create rhythms?]

SZIRMAI Imre

[Connection was found between rhythmic cortical activity and motor control. The 10 Hz μ-rhythm and the 20-30 Hz bursts represent two functional states of the somatomotor system. A correspondence of the central μ-rhythm of the motor cortex and the physiological hand tremor (8-12 Hz) is presumed. The precise tuning of the motor system can be estimated by the frequency of repetitive finger movements. In complex tapping exercise, the index finger is the most skillful, the 3rd, 4th and 5th fingers keep rhythm with less precision. It was found that the organization of mirror movements depends on the cortical representation of fingers. Mirror finger movements are more regular if the subject begins the motor action with the 5th (small) finger. Concerning cortical regulation of finger movements, it was suggested that there are two time-keeping systems in the brain; one with a sensitivity above and another with a sensitivity below the critical frequency of 3 Hz. The preferred meter which helps to maintain synchronous finger movements is the cadence of 4/4 and 8/8. We observed that the unlearned inward-outward sequential finger movement was equally impaired in nonmusician controls and patients with Parkinson-disease. In movement disorders, the ability of movement and the “clock-mechanism” are equally involved. The polyrhythmic finger movement is not our inborn ability, it has to be learned. The “timer” function, which regulates the rhythmic movement, is presumably localised in the basal ganglia or in the cerebellum. The meter of the music is built on the reciprocal values of 2 raised to the second to fifth power (1/12, 1/22, 1/23, 1/24, 1/25). The EEG frequencies that we consider important in the regulation of cons-cious motor actions are approximately in the same domain (4, 8, 16, 32, 64 Hz). During music performance, an important neural process is the coupling of distant brain areas. Concerning melody, the musical taste of Europeans is octavebased. Musical ornaments also follow the rule of the gothic construction, that is: pursuit of harmony towards the single one rising from the unification of 8-4-2 classes. Leibnitz concerned music as the unconscious mathematics of the soul. Movement-initiating effect of music is used in rehabilitation of patients with movement disorders. The meter and rhythm have superiority over the melody. It is possible that rhythmic movements can be generated also in the absence of sensory input and the central oscillators can produce “fictive motor patterns”.]