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Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[Sleep disordered breathing and epilepsy: relationships and therapeutic considerations]

FALUDI Béla, BÓNÉ Beáta, KOMOLY Sámuel, JANSZKY József

[The importance of the sleep related breathing disorders (obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, central sleep apnea, and Cheyne-Stokes breathing) in the pathophysiology crebro- and cardiovascular disorders is well known. The relationship of sleep related breathing abnormalities and epilepsy is also important but underestimated in the daily practice. The relation is bidirectional. The breathing abnormalities in sleep may play important role in generating epileptic seizure, but the adverse effect of seizure and antiepileptic therapy (generation of apneas and hypopneas) may worsen the seizure control. The effect of new therapies (vagal nerve and deep brain stimulation) on the sleep architecture and sleep disordered breathing must be examined and discussed. Here we present a brief case of epileptic patient with deep brain stimulation therapy on sleep as well. The examination of the sleep related breathing abnormalities in epilepsy patient may help improve the effectiveness of antiepileptic therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2020

[Intracranial EEG monitoring methods]

TÓTH Márton, JANSZKY József

[Resective surgery is considered to be the best option towards achieving seizure-free state in drug-resistant epilepsy. Intracranial EEG (iEEG) is necessary if the seizure-onset zone is localized near to an eloquent cortical area, or if the results of presurgical examinations are discordant, or if an extratemporal epilepsy patient is MRI-negative. Nowadays, 3 kinds of electrodes are used: (1) foramen ovale (FO) electrodes; (2) subdural strip or grid electrodes (SDG); (3) deep electrodes (stereo-electroencephalographia, SEEG). The usage of FO electrode is limited to bitemporal cases. SDG and SEEG have a distinct philosophical approach, different advantages and disadvantages. SDG is appropriate for localizing seizure-onset zones on hemispherial or interhemispherial surfaces; it is preferable if the seizure-onset zone is near to an eloquent cortical area. SEEG is excellent in exploration of deeper cortical structures (depths of cortical sulci, amygdala, hippocampus), although a very precise planning is required because of the low spatial sampling. The chance for seizure-freedom is relatively high performing both methods (SDG: 55%, SEEG: 64%), beside a tolerable rate of complications.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2020

Effects of valproate, carbamazepine and levetiracetam on Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio

YASAR Altun, ERDOGAN Yasar

Aim - To evaluate P-wave dispersion before and after antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment as well as to investigate the risk of ventricular repolarization using the Tpeak-Tend (Tp-e) interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with epileptic disorder. Methods - A total of 63 patients receiving AED therapy and 35 healthy adults were included. ECG recordings were obtained before and 3 months after anti-epileptic treatment among patients with epilepsy. For both groups, Tp-e and Tp-e/QT ratio were measured using a 12-lead ECG device. Results - Tp-e interval, Tpe/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios were found to be higher in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05, for all), while QTmax ratio was significantly lower in the patient group. After 3 months of AED therapy, significant increases in QT max, QTc max, QTcd, Tp-e, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc were found among the patients (p<0.05). When the arrhythmic effects of the drugs before and after treatment were compared, especially in the valproic acid group, there were significant increases in Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc values after three months of treatment (p<0.05). Carbamazepine and levetiracetam groups were not statistically significant in terms of pre- and post-treatment values. Conclusions - It was concluded that an arrhythmogenic environment may be associated with the disease, and patients who received AED monotherapy may need to be followed up more closely for arrhythmia.

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 20, 2020

["Punishment-therapy” - chances of psycho-rehabilitation for mentally ill offenders under forced medical treatment]

BACSÁK Dániel, KRÁMER Lili

[When examining the life course of mentally disordered offenders it is unavoidable to take into consideration the legal definition of in­sanity that exempts an individual from ordinary punishment in the given context of criminal law. As technical as it is, legal language describes and prescribes institutional responses on how to deal with mentally disordered offenders - not being independent from the everyday societal stereotypes on mental illness. In Hungary, the definition of criminal liability consists of medical and legal elements. Thus, in practice court appointed psychiatric experts are solely relied upon in determining whether or not the accused are criminally liable - the formal decision is in the hands of the court. If no criminal liability is determined by the experts, the court has to acquit the accused. In some special cases this acquittal opens the way to criminal psychiatric detention that is maintained by the Hungarian Prison Service. The aims of criminal psychiatric detention are twofold: rehabilitation and punishment. We suggest that it is nearly impossible to serve both of the aforementioned aims simultaneously. Furthermore, our article argues that the philosophy of care is focused on punishment and biomedical treatment nowadays, rather than rehabilitation and holistic bio-psycho-social treatment. The approach of treatment in operation makes successful recovery of patient-detainees difficult. Moreover, there are systemic issues as well: limited effects of review proceedings, holes in the psychiatric-social institutional care system and the general societal stigmatisation of people with mental illnesses can unreasonably prolong discharging “guilty patients”, thus, they stay detained 4-5 years longer. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 20, 2020

[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 10, 2019

[System approach in oncological care]

KOZLOVSKY Éva, SZEMÁN Anita

[As a successor of the traditional biomedical approach the biopsychosocial model provides an explanation for the origin of diseases which does not only focus on the biologic aspects, but suggests the infl uence of psychological and social factors as well. Paradigm shift resulted enhanced physician-patient cooperation while treatments have been expanded with the consideration of psychological and social factors which enabled the multidisciplinary team to more precisely estimate the patient’s condition and suitability for treatment, therefore, comprehensive direction of intervention can be conducted. Reactions, adaptation and coping with cancer can be described as an interaction of individual level, which involves the psychological features of the person in addition with social level that can be explained by family context.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

JUNE 30, 2019

[Understanding the past may help to shape the future (’Medical tasks, delegation and nursing’ - the past, present and the way forward)]

SÖVÉNYI Ferencné

[The history of nursing in Hungary has an aspect that has often been addressed but never looked into to the required depth and detail. This aspect concerns the regulation by law of certain specific relations between medicine and nursing from the mid-twentieth century to date. This issue has now come to the fore due partly to amendments to the legal framework and partly to changes in nursing education. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

JUNE 30, 2019

[Regulation of the Legal and Extent Competence for Nurse’s at Healthcare in Slovakia ]

KILÍKOVÁ Mária, HRINDOVÁ Tatiana, ČERVENÝ Martin

[The nursing competencies changed in Slovakia during 2018. One of the main goals of today’s nursing training is to ensure that nurses fully meet the needs of today’s society. According to the new regulation in Slovakia, it divided nurses into three categories. The aim of this article is, to explain what changes occurred in the competencies over the past year. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 10, 2019

[Risk assessment for child sexual abuse in the American legal practice]

KÓRÁSZ Krisztián

[The paper gives introspection into the child sexual abuse risk assessment practice in the USA by reviewing the literature. According to the definition of the World Health Organization, sexual assault is considered to be any act involving a child in a sexual activity if he or she can not be considered as prepared for the child's age or development. The author also makes an attempt to present some issues and pos­sible solutions regarding the current practice. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 15, 2019

[The association between advanced age and peripheral arterial disease]

KOLOSSVÁRY Endre, FARKAS Katalin

[The high-income countries are characterized by the aging of the residents (epidemiological transition) and the change of the disease patterns that are recognized in the population (epidemiological transition). In that sense, considering the cardiovascular diseases in the last few decades, a decline of mortality of acute, fatal conditions (stroke, myocardial infarction) is notable. All these factors contributed to the recognition of the importance of peripheral arterial disease and related problems in the aging popula­tion of the affected people. The high prevalence, the decline of quality of life associated with compromised lower limb circula­tion, the risk of the limb loss, the challenge of rehabilitation and the high mortality represent a significant and increasing burden to the healthcare. The review aims to analyse the relation of the aging population and peripheral arterial disease, addressing the aspects of epidemiology, diagnostics, and therapy. ]