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Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[The role of sleep in the relational memory processes ]

CSÁBI Eszter, ZÁMBÓ Ágnes, PROKECZ Lídia

[A growing body of evidence suggests that sleep plays an essential role in the consolidation of different memory systems, but less is known about the beneficial effect of sleep on relational memory processes and the recognition of emotional facial expressions, however, it is a fundamental cognitive skill in human everyday life. Thus, the study aims to investigate the effect of timing of learning and the role of sleep in relational memory processes. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. Our results suggest that the timing of learning and sleep plays an important role in the stabilizing process of memory representation to resist against forgetting.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

OCTOBER 30, 2019

[Conference Report: Pressure and venous ulcers’ wound care in a simulated learning environment ]

KORPONAI Zsófia, TÓTH Júlia, LŐRINCZ Attila

[Department of Nursing of Faculty of Heath Sciences Semmelweis University is a part of an international collaboration. The aim of the co-operation of 5 european universities is to labour an online theoretical and a simulation-based practical curriculum to improve the chronic wound care knowledge of nursing students and health care workers. 4th year nursing students presented the results of their research at the first international conference of the co-operation in december of 2018, in Istanbul. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 20, 2019

[Empirical examination of the persistence value among the students studying health-care at the beginning of student professionalization]

DINYÁNÉ Szabó Mariann, PUSZTAI Gabriella

[INTRODUCTION – Students in healthcare studies can help maintain the mental base and maintain their health if the lecturers know the degree of student persistence. When entering higher education, it is possible to measure the pre-university experience. Persistence determines the student's relationship to learning and can be a predictor of learning success. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS – A questionnaire study (N = 200) of the 1st year student (N = 200) of the Health Care Organization (BSc) of the University of Debrecen and Semmelweis University. For the continuous Persistence Variable a descriptive statistical method was used, an independent two-sample t-test was used for comparison between groups, and Hedges-g was used to express the effect size. We used the GLM (General Linear Model) model for fitting the persistence model. By means of factor analysis, we constructed factors from the significant predictor variables of the GLM model, which helped us assessing students' chances of learning. To quantify the strength of evidence against null hypothesis P < 0.05 (5% significance) was chosen as a standard level for concluding that there is evidence against the hypothesis tested. Statistical analysis was performed with IBM SPSS Statistics 24.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). RESULTS – The persistence factor loadings can be divided into three types: high, medium and low. High persistence rearranges student preferences, low interest persistence, minimal interest in academic engagement. In the case of middle-ranking people, the importance of volunteering (life-experience) and friendship is paramount. CONCLUSIONS – The results indicate that at the beginning of the student life there is a willingness, diligence, acceptance of academic values, interest or lack of interest in future success studies. During the stu­dies, these features can be monitored and the necessary interventions can be made in time.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

[Second game, 37th move and Fourth game 78th move]

VOKÓ Zoltán

[What has Go to do with making clinical decisions? One of the greatest intellectual challenges of bedside medicine is making decisions under uncertainty. Besides the psychological traps of traditionally intuitive and heuristic medical decision making, lack of information, scarce resources and characteristics of doctor-patient relationship contribute equally to this uncertainty. Formal, mathematical model based analysis of decisions used widely in developing clinical guidelines and in health technology assessment provides a good tool in theoretical terms to avoid pitfalls of intuitive decision making. Nevertheless it can be hardly used in individual situations and most physicians dislike it as well. This method, however, has its own limitations, especially while tailoring individual decisions, under inclusion of potential lack of input data used for calculations, or its large imprecision, and the low capability of the current mathematical models to represent the full complexity and variability of processes in complex systems. Nevertheless, clinical decision support systems can be helpful in the individual decision making of physicians if they are well integrated in the health information systems, and do not break down the physicians’ autonomy of making decisions. Classical decision support systems are knowledge based and rely on system of rules and problem specific algorithms. They are utilized widely from health administration to image processing. The current information revolution created the so-called artificial intelligence by machine learning methods, i.e. machines can learn indeed. This new generation of artificial intelligence is not based on particular system of rules but on neuronal networks teaching themselves by huge databases and general learning algorithms. This type of artificial intelligence outperforms humans already in certain fields like chess, Go, or aerial combat. Its development is full of challenges and threats, while it presents a technological breakthrough, which cannot be stopped and will transform our world. Its development and application has already started also in the healthcare. Health professionals must participate in this development to steer it into the right direction. Lee Sedol, 18-times Go world champion retired three years after his historical defeat from AlphaGo artificial intelligence, be­cause “Even if I become the No. 1, there is an entity that cannot be defeated”. It is our great luck that we do not need to compete or defeat it, we must ensure instead that it would be safe and trustworthy, and in collaboration with humans this entity would make healthcare more effective and efficient. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2021

Neuroscience highlights: The mirror inside our brain

KRABÓTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Over the second half of the 19th century, numerous theories arose concerning mechanisms involved in understanding of action, imitative learning, language development and theory of mind. These explorations gained new momentum with the discovery of the so called “mirror neurons”. Rizzolatti’s work inspired large groups of scientists seeking explanation in a new and hitherto unexplored area of how we perceive and understand the actions and intentions of others, how we learn through imitation to help our own survival, and what mechanisms have helped us to develop a unique human trait, language. Numerous studies have addressed these questions over the years, gathering information about mirror neurons themselves, their subtypes, the different brain areas involved in the mirror neuron system, their role in the above mentioned mechanisms, and the varying consequences of their dysfunction in human life. In this short review, we summarize the most important theories and discoveries that argue for the existence of the mirror neuron system, and its essential function in normal human life or some pathological conditions.

Hypertension and nephrology

NOVEMBER 04, 2020

[The role of stress management in the care of hypertension and the treatment of cardiovascular disease]

SOMOGYI Éva, KISS Zoltán, STAUDER Adrienne

[The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the relationship between stress and hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, furthermore to introduce an evidence based stress management intervention available in Hungary. The correlation between cardiovascular disease and psychosocial factors (including concomitant mental disorders as well as personality traits or the effect of social environment) has been established in numerous studies aimed at investigating pathogenesis or various clinical endpoints. The 2016 Guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology include the assessment and the management of psychosocial problems with behavioral medicine interventions as a I.A level recommendation. The implementation of these guidelines in everyday clinical practice is crucial to decrease cardiovascular risk. This involves the training of health care professionals, the facilitation of multidisciplinary collaboration and the integration of behavioral intervention into everyday care. The Williams Life Skills (WLS) program is an evidence based behavioral medicine intervention aiming to improve stress management and communication skills which implemented internationally and also available all over Hungary. It involves the learning of simple coping strategies that facilitate the successful management of every day psychosocial stress situations and the self-conscious reduction of bodily and psychological tensions. In cardiovascular disease, this improves quality of life and survival. The WLS program is especially recommended for healthcare workers to decrease the negative health consequences of their high stress load and to prevent burnout. Stress may affect both doctors and patients during their interactions. Bálint groups have a positive impact on the physician-patient collaboration and help to reduce burnout by improving the understanding of the diseases from a more complex approach.]

Hypertension and nephrology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[Statins for elderly people, in primary prevention?]

BAJNOK László

[In a recent, retrospective cohort study, statin usage in primary prevention was found being not beneficial for patients (i) without diabetes over 75 years of age, and (ii) with diabetes over 85 years of age (75-84 years total mortality of diabetics was also lower). These findings are in sharp contrast to the two outstanding, double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized, a primary prevention studies done with rosuvastatin. Of these, 50% reduction in LDL-C in JUPITER was associated with a 50% reduction in risk and 25% reduction in LDL-C in HOPE-3 with 25% reduction in risk. Furthermore, subgroup analyzes did not indicate lower efficacy for the elderly. The recommendation of the European Atherosclerosis Society for primary preventions of the elderlies recommending consideration of statin use in these cases (Class IIa) is particularly relevant, especially in the presence of other risk factors such as hypertension. In the primary prevention lipid treatment, we can see quite clearly till 75 years of age and hopefully, we will even further after learning about the results of STAREE, a study that is designed to elderly and in which 40 mg atorvastatin is applied.]

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 10, 2018

[The role of early clinical studies in oncology]

KERPEL-FRONIUS Sándor

[Although the basic theory of the early development of different drug groups is identical, due to their various pharmacological characteristics the design of the studies, the starting safe dose and the selection of the pharmacologic and therapeutic end-points show signifi cant differences. The development process of drugs is usually divided into two functionally different parts, the learning and the confi rming phases, respectively. The aim of the fi rst part is the description of the suggested targets, the mechanism of action in humans and the characterization of the drug-linked biomarkers. This section contains the microdose (phase 0), phase I and II studies. The end-point of this part is the proof of the underlying concept which was developed on the basis of the non-clinical studies. According to the internationally accepted terminology, this strategically important point is called the Proof of Concept (POC). Upon POC it has to be decided whether the drug-candidate possesses those qualities which make it worthwhile to perform human phase III studies, treating the statistically required number of patients for proving the good therapeutic effi cacy and safety of the drug. This section of the drug development is called the confi rmatory phase. The use of highly sophisticated technology opened the possibility to apply microdoses in humans for studying the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of new drugs as well as the characteristics of human biomarkers at very low, harmless drug doses. This approach made possible to draw important conclusions on the usefulness of biomarkers for the clinical practice even following the fi rst drug-application. The planning of phases I and II studies, the calculation of the applicable doses, the selection of the pharmacologic and therapeutic end-points, the use of biomarkers, are all based on the concept of translational medicine and are essentially dependent on the results obtained both in animal experiments and human microdose studies.]