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Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 30, 2019

[Treatment of cholangiocellular carcinoma]

ANDRÁS Csilla, ÁRKOSY Péter

[Tumors of the biliary tract are a rare entity, at the time of diagnosis most of the patients are in advanced stage and operation can’t be effectuated. After operation the risk of recurrence is high. The standard adjuvant therapy is capecitabin based on the results of BILCAP study. In advanced stage or in the presence of metastates the standard fi rst line treatment is gemcitabine and cisplatin therapy, there are noninferiority results from a Japan study with gemcitabin and S1 combination therapy. There was no evidence of second line treatment possibilities after gemcitabine and cisplatin therapy until 2019, but based on the results of ABC-06 study mFOLFOX could be the choice in the future. In the case of MSI-H/dMMR tumors immuntherapy should be considered. Personalised medicine with matched molecular targeted therapy is a new option. There are 2 new molecular targets, FGFR and IDH, the preliminary result are very promising.]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 10, 2019

[New perspectives in the treatment of lung cancer]

SZONDY Klára, BOGOS Krisztina

[In recent years, huge research is going on in the fi eld of oncology and as a result, we can see a signifi cantly longer survival in this area of medicine. Lung cancer, which has been taken places in the back for decades, it has not become a curable disease, but begins to belong to the chronic diseases. As a result of brilliant surgical technics and stereotactic radiotherapy, or as a result of changes in drug treatment, 5-year survival is not uncommon in metastatic lung cancer patients, next to relatively long progression free survive. After the third-generation cytotoxic combinations the added growth inhibition (VEGF inhibitor) maintenance therapy or continuous pemetrexed cytotoxic chemotherapy were resulted in high survival benefi ts. The fi rst real breakthrough, long progression-free survival was achieved by targeted treatment, which proved to be effective with known driver mutations. The other great result, especially in squamous cell carcinoma, was the immunotherapy, the inhibition of immune checkpoints, which effi cacy was confi rmed in adenocarcinoma also. Several studies are going on with adjuvant or neoadjuvant immunotherapy, and combined use of immunotherapy (either in combination with radiotherapy or cytotoxic chemotherapy).]

Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 05, 2017

[Complex therapy of bladder cancer]

LANDHERR László

[Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy involving the urinary system. Urothelial (formerly called transitional cell) carcinoma is the predominant histologic type in the developed countries, where it accounts for approximately 90 percent of all bladder cancers. The optimal management of nonmuscle invasive urothelial cancer is highly important. For patients with muscle invasive cancer the gold standard treatment is the cystectomy. If the patient unable or unwilling to undergo radical cystectomy with urinary diversion, complete TURBT combined with radiation therapy plus chemotherapy may offer an alternative bladder-sparing approach. Patients with muscle invasive disease and regional lymph node metastasis limited to the pelvis (N1-N3), but without more distant lymph node or visceral metastasis may be treated with six cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by cystectomy or a combined-modality approach. In metastatic cases the combination chemotherapy may prolong survival and often provides palliation of symptomatic disease. Checkpoint inhibition immunotherapy has substantial clinical activity in post-chemotherapy patients and is the preferred therapy for patients who have progressed after platinumbased therapy or is not suitable for them.]