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Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 24, 2020

[Possibilities and limitations. Dietary difficulties of chronic renal failure in childhood]

REUSZ György, SZABÓ Adrienn

[In chronic kidney disease (CKD), the role of the kidney in assuring homeostasis is gradually deteriorating. Besides fluid, electrolyte and hormonal disturbances, detoxification and control of blood pressure is insufficient without external help. In children, in addition to achieving equilibrium it is also essential to ensure optimal physical and cognitive/psychological development. Adequate calorie intake is a major determinant of growth during infancy. Among the therapeutic options it is essential to ensure a proper diet. In addition to reflecting the special needs of renal failure in its composition, it must be palatable for the child. Children with kidney disease should have a normal energy diet. Protein intake should not be reduced from the baseline recommendation, but lower phosphorus and high bioavailability should be preferred. A low sodium and potassium diet is recommended for a significant proportion of patients and is based on dietary advice. Further, diet planning may be problematic if the child has special dietary requirements and is in need of nasogastric tube feeding. Because diet planning is a complex task, it is difficult to achieve optimal protein supply and mineral restriction along with high energy intake. In such cases, enteral nutrition with special formulas/ drinks developed for pediatric nutrition may provide a solution.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2021

Neuroscience highlights: The mirror inside our brain

KRABÓTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Over the second half of the 19th century, numerous theories arose concerning mechanisms involved in understanding of action, imitative learning, language development and theory of mind. These explorations gained new momentum with the discovery of the so called “mirror neurons”. Rizzolatti’s work inspired large groups of scientists seeking explanation in a new and hitherto unexplored area of how we perceive and understand the actions and intentions of others, how we learn through imitation to help our own survival, and what mechanisms have helped us to develop a unique human trait, language. Numerous studies have addressed these questions over the years, gathering information about mirror neurons themselves, their subtypes, the different brain areas involved in the mirror neuron system, their role in the above mentioned mechanisms, and the varying consequences of their dysfunction in human life. In this short review, we summarize the most important theories and discoveries that argue for the existence of the mirror neuron system, and its essential function in normal human life or some pathological conditions.

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

[Second game, 37th move and Fourth game 78th move]

VOKÓ Zoltán

[What has Go to do with making clinical decisions? One of the greatest intellectual challenges of bedside medicine is making decisions under uncertainty. Besides the psychological traps of traditionally intuitive and heuristic medical decision making, lack of information, scarce resources and characteristics of doctor-patient relationship contribute equally to this uncertainty. Formal, mathematical model based analysis of decisions used widely in developing clinical guidelines and in health technology assessment provides a good tool in theoretical terms to avoid pitfalls of intuitive decision making. Nevertheless it can be hardly used in individual situations and most physicians dislike it as well. This method, however, has its own limitations, especially while tailoring individual decisions, under inclusion of potential lack of input data used for calculations, or its large imprecision, and the low capability of the current mathematical models to represent the full complexity and variability of processes in complex systems. Nevertheless, clinical decision support systems can be helpful in the individual decision making of physicians if they are well integrated in the health information systems, and do not break down the physicians’ autonomy of making decisions. Classical decision support systems are knowledge based and rely on system of rules and problem specific algorithms. They are utilized widely from health administration to image processing. The current information revolution created the so-called artificial intelligence by machine learning methods, i.e. machines can learn indeed. This new generation of artificial intelligence is not based on particular system of rules but on neuronal networks teaching themselves by huge databases and general learning algorithms. This type of artificial intelligence outperforms humans already in certain fields like chess, Go, or aerial combat. Its development is full of challenges and threats, while it presents a technological breakthrough, which cannot be stopped and will transform our world. Its development and application has already started also in the healthcare. Health professionals must participate in this development to steer it into the right direction. Lee Sedol, 18-times Go world champion retired three years after his historical defeat from AlphaGo artificial intelligence, be­cause “Even if I become the No. 1, there is an entity that cannot be defeated”. It is our great luck that we do not need to compete or defeat it, we must ensure instead that it would be safe and trustworthy, and in collaboration with humans this entity would make healthcare more effective and efficient. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2020

[Comparative analysis of the full and shortened versions of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory]

ÁDÁM Szilvia, DOMBRÁDI Viktor, MÉSZÁROS Veronika, BÁNYAI Gábor, NISTOR Anikó, BÍRÓ Klára

[Background – The two free-to-use versions of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI) have been increasingly utilised to assess the prevalence of burnout among human service workers. The OLBI has been developed to overcome some of the psychometric and conceptual limitations of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the gold standard of burnout measures. There is a lack of data on the structural validity of the Mini Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory in Hungary. Purpose – To assess the structural validity of the Hungarian versions of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and the Mini-Oldenburg Burnout Inventory. Methods – We enrolled 564 participants (196 healthcare workers, 104 nurses and 264 clinicians) in three cross-sectional surveys. In our analysis we assessed the construct validity of the instruments using confirmatory factor analysis and internal consistency using coefficient Cronbach’s α. Results – We confirmed the two-dimensional structure (exhaustion and disengagement) of the Mini-Oldenburg Inventory and a shortened version of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory Internal consistency coefficient confirmed the reliability of the instruments. The burnout appeared more than a 50 percent of the participants in every subsample. The prevalence of exhaustion was above 54.5% in each of the subsamples and the proportion of disengaged clinicians was particularly high (92%). Conclusions – Our findings provide support for the construct validity and reliability of the Hungarian versions of the Mini-Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and a shortened version of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory in the assessment of burnout among clinicians and nurses in Hungary.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

OCTOBER 30, 2019

Use of Imogene King’s Nursing Model in the Care for a Patient with Heart Arrhythmias

CLOUBOVÁ Ivana, BULAVA Alan

Objectives: To discover the benefits of implementation of Imogene King’s nursing model into nursing care in a patient with arrhythmias. To find out how these patients are limited in saturation of their own needs and what are the most severe limitations for patients with arrhythmias. Material and methods: Qualitative research using semi-structured interviews. The interview with patients with arrhythmia was conducted in accordance with the structure of King’s nursing model. Results: The research group consisted of 20 respondents; 13 men and seven women. All respondents expressed satisfaction with their cooperation with staff. The respondents described a change in the subjectively perceived state, the psychic state, and emotions. Conclusions: Assessment of the subjectively perceived quality of life of patients with arrhythmias using the King’s interaction model allows nurses to see the patient from the holistic point of view and plan and provide individualized care.

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2019

Attitude of spine surgeons towards the application of 3D technologies - a survey of AOSpine members

ÉLTES Endre Péter, KISS László, BARTOS Márton, EÖSZE Zsolt, SZÖVÉRFI Zsolt, VARGA Pál Péter, LAZÁRI Áron

Background - 3D technologies (3D virtual and physical model, 3D printing, computer aided engineering, finite element analysis based simulations) play an important role in personalized spine surgery. Objective - In collaboration with AOSpine a global, online survey-based study was performed in order to determine the acceptance rate and the factors which stand against the wider spread of 3D technologies. Methods - A survey containing 21 questions was developed and divided into five pages, every page corresponding to one chapter. Our analysis is based on the responses of 282 spine surgeons from 57 countries. To interpret our results in a global context, we used the Human Development Index of the respondent's countries in comparisons. Results - Significant difference between the AOSpine regions (p ≤ 0.05) was found, with the highest acceptance in Asia-Pacific region. There was no significant difference in acceptance score according to the field of spine surgery, or the surgical experience in years (p=0.77, and p=0.19). In the case of public practice, we found significantly higher acceptance compared to private and mixed (public and private) surgical practice (p ≤ 0.05). The acceptance of the technology varied based on the respondent’s resident country’s Human Development Index and was significantly different between „Medium” vs “Very high” (p = 0.0005) and „High” vs „Very high” (p=0.019) category. Significant positive correlation was found between the acceptance score and the HDI score (Spearman test, ρ = 0.37, p = 0.007). The main limitation factor was identified as the lack of information. Conclusion - There is high interest among spine surgeons towards the incorporation of 3D technologies into the clinical practice. Education, the healthcare system, and the economic environment plays a major role in acceptance. Our results provide the basis of a strategy to promote the application of 3D technologies.

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2019

The prevalence of sarcopenia and dynapenia according to stage among Alzheimer-type dementia patients

YAZAR Tamer, YAZAR Olgun Hülya

Aim - In this study, the aim was to identify the prevalence of sarcopenia and dynapenia according to disease stage among Alzheimer-type dementia (AD) patients and collect data to suggest precautions related to reducing the disease load. Method - The study was completed with 127 patients separated into stages according to Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) criteria and 279 healthy volunteers aged 18-39 years and 70-80 years abiding by the exclusion criteria who agreed to participate in the research. Our prospective and cross-sectional study applied the CDR and mini mental test (MMSE) to patients with disorder in more than one cognitive area and possible AD diagnosis according to NINCDS-ADRDA (National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke-Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association) diagnostic criteria. The patient and control groups had skeletal muscle mass index (SMMI), muscle strength and physical performance assessed with sarcopenia diagnosis according to European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) diagnostic criteria. Results - In our study, in parallel with the increase in disease stage of AD patients, the prevalence of sarcopenia (led by severe sarcopenia) and dynapenia was higher compared to a control group of similar age. Conclusion - In chronic, progressive diseases, like AD, identification of changes in parameters, like muscle mass and strength and reductions in physical performance in the early period, is important for identification and to take precautions in the initial stages considering the limitations of the preventive effects of treatment applied after diagnosis of AD.

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2018

[28 years in the service of the cooperation of national clinical neurosciences]

RAJNA Péter, TAJTI János

[Two leading managers of the scientific journal currently publishing its 71st volume give an overview on the history and content- and form-related development of the journal. Recognizing the constantly decreasing role of paper-based literature products, the value system and the priorities of the journal were established more than 20 years ago: 1) preservation of high standards by achieving and maintaining international registration and annual qualification (i.e. impact factor); 2) enabling publication in Hungarian language for scientists living in Hungary and abroad; 3) displaying an ever broader spectrum of clinical neurosciences in the publications; 4) presentation of cutting-edge findings (related to the etiology, diagnostics, therapy, and care) of the most frequent and most relevant diseases in order to assure and enhance the quality of national clinical practice; 5) providing the possibility for the highest possible standard of scientific publication for Hungarian clinical neuroscientist; and finally 6) maintaining a readily available interaction surface and debate forum for the involved professionals in clinical questions of public interest. With respect to the above aspects, an outline is given of the efforts of the nearly three decades by listing editorial, publication, and other activities introduced throughout the history of the journal. The presumed strengths and weaknesses of the journal are summarized, the opportunities and limitations of the established objectives are highlighted, based on which the editors outline the most important tasks (SWOT analysis).]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 02, 2018

[Everyday practice of atrial fibrillation treatment]

KISS István, BENCZÚR Béla

[The clinical importance of atrial fibrillation - the most frequent arrhythmia - is derived from the fact that it means a 5-fold risk of stroke/systemic embolism which contributes to the increased cardiovascular morbidity/mortality. Long-term oral anticoagulant therapy is a cornerstone of stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Until recently Vitamin-K antagonists were the only available therapeutic option but its everyday use has several limitations, eg. bleeding risk, narrow therapeutic range, drug and food interactions and the need of monthly INR-control. The advent of NOAC-s may prevent a lot of difficulties regarding VKA-treatment and lead to as efficacious as and safer therapy than VKAs. These benefits can help better adherence of patients to the anticoagulant therapy which is one of the most important element of more effective stroke prevention. NOACs can be used more safely both in real life and in special patient populations (eg. elderly, type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney injury) than VKAs so they can contribute to effective cardiovascular risk reduction.]