Search results

Hypertension and nephrology

OCTOBER 20, 2018

[The importance of recognition and proper treatment of hypertension and the maintenance of adherence in hypertension care]

NEMCSIK János, PÁLL Dénes, JÁRAI Zoltán

[Hypertension is the leading cause of death and disability-adjusted life years. In the United States hypertension accounts for more cardiovascular (CV) deaths than any other modifiable CV disease risk factor and was second only to cigarette smoking as a preventable cause of death for any reason. In our country the situation is similar. In Hungary the number of subjects with hypertension is approximately 3.5 million and this high prevalence contributes markedly to the poor Hungarian CV morbidity and mortality figures. The recognition of hypertension, the initiation of drug therapy and the long-term follow- up of the patients is mainly the task of primary care. Besides that it inheres high responsibility, this is also a grateful commitment, as hypertension in most of the cases can be treated properly with lifestyle-changes and medications leading to a marked decrease of CV complications, especially stroke. In our review article we would like to focus on the high prevalence of hypertension worldwide as well as in our country, the exact implementation of screening, the risk reduction potential of the proper treatment and the importance of the long-term maintenance of treatment adherence.]

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[Post-career development of cardiometabolic changes and hypertension in competitive athletes]

LELBACH Ádám, KÁNTOR Márk, KOLLER Ákos

[Regular physical activity is essential in delaying the aging processes (e.g. arterial remodelling – stiffening, metabolism, bodyweight), the beneficial effects of competitive sports – especially strength sports – according to the recent data of the literature are questionable. The beneficial effects of physical activity on the cardiovascular (CV) system are well known, however less is known regarding the delayed impacts of high intensity competitive sports on the CV system, especially after the sport career is over. This review summarizes the effects of active competitive sport and the post-career period on the cardiometabolic system with special attention to the systemic blood pressure and the development of metabolic syndrome. After sport career, the welldeveloped high performance cardiovascular- and metabolic system suddenly is much less used, but still supported by sport-level diet. It is well known that hypertension is a significant pathogenic factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases, characterized – among others – by reduced elasticity of large- and medium- sized vessels thereby importantly contributing to the development of systolic hypertension. Inflammation and thrombus formation both play an important role in the development of vascular injury and atherosclerosis. The increased tone of microvessels can impair the blood supply of certain organs, including the coronary circulation. It has been ample shown, that regular non-competitive, aerobic exercise activities are important factors in preventing hypertension. Such pathological changes become more evident after the development of post-career obesity, as well as the development of hypertension due to the activation of the renin-angiotensin system through sodium retention and other metabolic changes (increased glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus). It has been ample shown, that regular non-competitive, dynamic aerobic exercise activities are important factors in preventing hypertension. The frequency, intensity, type, and time (FITT) principle of exercise prescription is the first and common therapeutic approach, which represents the translation of cardiovascular basic science research results into hypertension treatment, thus can provide a personalized physical activity program/therapy according to medical needs not just for the post-career sportspersons, but the wide range of patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 24, 2020

[Hypertension and Covid-19 – Part I. Significance of age, underlying diseases, and ACEI/ARB therapy in hypertension and co-morbidities during SARS-Cov2 infection]

KÉKES Ede, SZÉKÁCS Béla, NAGY Judit, KOVÁCS Tibor

[The appearance of the Covid-19 epidemic in different continents shows specific clinical features. Confirmed infected patients are detectable from approximately 30 years, with a maximum between 40 and 70 years of age. At the same time, however, a significant proportion of those who die from the infection come from patients over 65 years. The prevalence and mortality rates of the hypertensive population show a very similar formation. Based on the data collected, it is not surprising that hypertension as the underlying disease in the Covid- 19 epidemic is the first in all analysis. A more precise analysis clarified that it is not hypertension per se, but co-morbidities and complications of hypertension that play a primary role behind large-scale mortality in old age, such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Data from China, North America, and Italy suggest that hypertension and diabetes – and in North America, pathological obesity – in infected patients actually only reflect the prevalence of these diseases in a given population. The presence of comorbidities (coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, arrhythmia, chronic kidney disease) – based on multivariate logistic regression analysis – presents a more risk for severe clinical course and mortality. Some recent analyses have provided strong evidence that ACEI/ARB treatment does not pose a higher risk for the course or outcome of infection. Their administration is constantly needed in hypertension and comorbidities due to their organ protective and slowing the progression of diseases.]

Hypertension and nephrology

DECEMBER 12, 2019

[Hypertension and brain function. Correlation of high blood pressure and demencia in aging. Hypertension in young-middle adults - demencia in elderly]

SZÉKÁCS Béla, KÉKES Ede

[The cerebral vascular damage caused by hypertension is manifested primarily in cognitive dysfunction, which is caused by hypoperfusion of brain tissue, ischemic, or bleeding stroke, or white matte injury. Hypertension may not only result in cerebral damage to the vascular background - dementia -, but may also contribute to the development and progression of classical gene-related Alzheimer’s disease. Blood pressure gradually increases in the elderly and in the very elderly, and the frequency of hypertension-mostly as isolated systolic hypertension - is 50% to 70%. High blood pressure predominately, or in full, means not only an increase in the circulatory resistance of the small children, but also, as part of the aging of the body, the rigidity (stiffness) of the arteries. At the same time, the incidence of dementia, along with age, rises sharply - up to 20% in those over 65 years of age, and over 40% in 80-90 years of age. The relationship between high blood pressure and dementia from the young age to the very old age may change as a function of current age. In the very old age of life, the varying influence of other pathological factors other than hypertension is becoming more and more important in the deterioration of both the vascular structure and the brain function. In this late stage of life, the very advanced rate of aging and nutritive blood flow often require higher perfusion pressure, and the not enough thought-out blood pressure reduction can be more damaging than a protective effect on brain condition or function. SPRINT MIND - the Intense Blood Pressure Reduction - hasn’t resolved the question, and we can legally assume that the 130-140 Hgmm SBP. Is the most favorable for dementia. The value of DBP 70 Hgmm is definitely unfavorable.]

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 12, 2018

[Treatment of hypertension in kidney transplant patients]

KOVÁCS Tibor, WAGNER László

[Most of the renal transplant recipients suffer from hypertension. Hypertension substantially contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality in this population. The recommendation of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension and the international guidelines suggest to achieve less than 130/80 mmHg as target blood pressure in these patients. Several factors may be in the background of hypertension after kidney transplantation, which can be summarized as factors from the recipient-side, the donorside and factors provoked by transplantation itself. In most of the cases early after transplantation high doses of immunosuppressive drugs (especially calcineurin inhibitors and steroids) are responsible for the increased blood pressure. There are some further special methods apart from the general recommendations which are needed during the examination of hypertension of kidney transplant patients: e.g. measurement of blood trough-level of immunosuppressive drugs, investigation of bone-mineral disorder, screening for the level and causes of anaemia, check-up of the renal graft circulation. Kidney transplant patients suffering from hypertension usually need more than two antihypertensive drugs beyond the use of non-pharmaceutical antihypertensive methods. In the early posttransplantation period calcium channel blockers are preferred antihypertensive medications, because they counterbalance the vasoconstrictive effect of calcineurin inhibitors. The administration of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitors are rather suggested after the stabilization of renal function (from the 1-3 months posttransplantation). When designing antihypertensive strategy, comorbidities and special factors should be regarded as well, especially volume overload, proteinuria, allograft function (GFR), diabetes, other cardiovascular risk factors, previous cardiovascular events. The setup of an individual therapeutical strategy is advised in view of all these factors, which is different according to the timing after transplantation: the perioperative, the early postoperative phases and from 1-3 months after transplantation have special focuses.]

Hypertension and nephrology

FEBRUARY 24, 2021

[Prevalence and treatment of hypertension in patients with newly diagnosed familial hypercholesterolemia]

NÁDRÓ Bíborka, DIÓSZEGI Ágnes, KOVÁCS Beáta, PARAGH György, PÁLL Dénes, HARANGI Mariann

[Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited defect of cholesterol metabolism characterized by high plasma total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and premature cardiovascular disease risk. Prevalence of hypertension in FH is not clarified, but its appearance is independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, optimal treatment has a major priority in this high-risk population. We aimed to investigate the lipid parameters and evaluate the presence of hypertension and its treatment characteristics in 86 newly diagnosed, untreated heterozygous FH patients (27 males, 59 females, mean age 53.6±13.4 years). We diagnosed FH by using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network criteria. The mean TC level was 8.49±1.7 mmol/l, the mean LDL-C level was 6.11±1.5 mmol/l, the mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level was 1.62±0.5 mmol/l, while the median lipoprotein (a) level was 301 mg/l. We diagnosed 33 FH patients (38.4%) with hypertension. Beta blockers were used in 23, ACE-inhibitors in 13, ARBs in 12, calcium channel blockers in 9, and HCT in 11 cases. 11 patients was treated with monotherapy, for 10 patients double, for 11 patients triple, while for 1 patient quadruple combined antihypertensive therapy was administered. Based on our results, hypertension might be underdiagnosed in this specific patient population. Neither the types nor the combination patterns of blood pressure lowering agents are in line with current guidelines. Up to date screening and treatment of hypertension should be worth considering in this extremely high risk population with enhanced atherosclerosis.]

Hypertension and nephrology

DECEMBER 12, 2019

[Predictive factors for ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease among hypertensive patients based on the data of the Hungarian Hypertension Registry 2011-2013-2015. Part I. Hypertensive population aged 35 to 64 years]

KÉKES Ede, PAKSY András, SZEGEDI János, JÁRAI Zoltán

[The association of hypertension with ischemic heart disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease is the greatest therapeutic challenge because these associations significantly increase mortality and deteriorate life expectancy. It is important for the clinician to clarify the predictive factors of each association for successful prevention or slowing the progression of diseases. According to the database of the Hungarian Hypertension Registry 2011-2013-2015, 11,137 men and 11,112 women with hypertension and comorbidities (CHD, diabetes, CKD) aged between 35 and 64 were analyzed for the purpose of assessing the predictive value of the traditional risk factors in co-morbidity. We analyzed the predictive weight of each variable with single- and multi-variable stepwise logistic regression, and reported Odds ratio (OR, odds ratio). In patients with hypertension aged 35-64 (male / female), the prevalence of CHD was 41.6% / 35.8%, diabetes 27.1% / 23% and KVB 16.2% / 33.8%, respectively. The chance of developing CHD is highest in hypertensive individuals (male/female) who have diabetes (OR 1.30/1.48), who are obese (OR 1.22/1.21), who smoke (OR 1.50/1.51), and whose blood pressure >140/90 mmHg (OR 1.23/1.29). The dominant predictive factors of type 2 diabetes are obesity (visceral obesity) (OR 1.46/1.49), low HDL cholesterol (OR 1.32/1.35), and high triglyceride levels (OR 1.20/1.42); in women the uric acid level also showed high odds ratio (OR 1.39). There is a significant chance of developing chronic kidney disease in hypertension in both sexes, if abnormal uric acid levels (OR 1.73/1.46) and inadequate treatment of high blood pressure (>140Hgmm SBP) (OR 1.43/1.19) are present. In women, the abnormal triglyceride level) also showed a high odd (OR 1.81).]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 15, 2019

[Hypertension in the elderly ]

BARNA István

[Elevated isolated systolic pressure is the most common and greatest cardiovascular risk factor with age. The prevalence of hypertension increases with age and ex­ceeds 60% over 70 years. Proper treatment of hypertension in the elderly, even in very old age (> 80 years), increases life expectancy and reduces the risk of cardiovascular events. For patients over 65 years of age, the target blood pressure range is between 130-139 / 70-80 mmHg if the patient tolerates the treatment. In elderly patients with poorer conditions, systolic blood pressure may be <150 mmHg. White-coat hypertension is common, nondipper ratio is increased, autonomic nervous system dysregulation is more common, and orthostatic decrease of blood pressure. The renal function is decreased or already impaired, often resulting in poorer therapeutic cooperation due to impaired cognitive function. The blood pressure lowering effect of targeted lifestyle changes may be the same as medication monotherapy, with the main disadvantage of decreasing adherence over time, for which a proper physician-patient relationship is essential. First-line agents for the treatment of elderly hypertension include angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), long-acting calcium channel blockers, and thiazide, thiazide-like diuretics. Beta-blockers should be used in the treatment of elderly hypertension if they have other indications (coronary heart disease, heart failure, arrhythmias). More than 70% of hypertensive patients should use combination therapy to achieve target blood pressure. Take advantage of fixed dose combination to improve compliance to optimize treatment. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

[The prevalence of therapy resistant hypertension]

FEJES Imola, ÁBRAHÁM György, LÉGRÁDY Péter

[In our country as well as around the world the most common chronic disease is the hypertension, and it is also an important risk factor causing disability and premature death. Within this, getting to know the true prevalence of therapy- resistant hypertension is important also from a public health perspective, since the prognosis of it is worse than that of those who reaches goal blood pressure range. It usually comes with hypertension mediated organ damages and higher (2- 2.5 folder) cardiovascular risk. It is prevalence in the literature is from 5% to 30%. The knowledge of the true prevalence depends on many factors, like: there are many different definitions of resistant hypertension, what is the main profile of the data collecting study site and what level of the health care system it works, or for example a questionnaire of a multicenter trial cannot be used totally in each country and study site.]

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 20, 2019

[Hyperuricemia in hypertension. Domestic experience based on the data of the Hungarian Hypertonia Register 2011., 2013., 2015. Part II.]

ALFÖLDI Sándor, PAKSY András, KÉKES Ede

[Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is frequent in hypertension and its prevalence is increasing. Authors studied the incidence of serum uric acid levels and its correlation with age, risk factors, anthropological, metabolic characteristics, blood pressure, blood pressure target, organ damage, age-related co-morbidity in 47,372 hypertensive patients (22,688 males, 24,694 women). In the second part of their analysis the prevalence of hyperuricemia was 13.8% in hypertensive men and 21.6% in women. The age, BMI, waist diameter, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and onset of hypertension, serum cholesterol, triglyceride, blood glucose and serum creatinine were slightly higher, but serum HDL cholesterol and eGFR were slightly lower in hyperuricemic hypertensive patients, independently of their gender. Among hypertension mediated organ damage ischemic and left ventricular hypertensive ECG alterations, mild chronic kidney disease and proteinuria, among hypertension associated diseases diabetes associated ischemic heart disease, chronic kidney disease associated diabetes and both ischemic and chronic kidney disease associated diabetes were significantly more frequent in hyperuricemic hypertensive patients.]