Search results

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

APRIL 30, 2017

[Introduction of the Hungarian Hospice- Palliative Association]

LUKÁCS Miklós

[The Hungarian Hospice-Palliative Association was founded in 1995 and represents nearly a hundred national hospice organization. Our goal is to promote technical cooperation, development of end of life care to terminally ill patients, social awareness and volunteerism, social responsibility and promoting solidarity with the patients. This is accomplished by initial and continuing vocational training, organizing conferences, professional guidelines and the formulation of policies, research support and coordination of publications.]

Clinical Oncology

MAY 20, 2016

[The role of hospice in the management of cancer patients]

TORGYIK Pál

[There is the relationship between the oncological treatment and hospice care proved by the data on morbidity and mortality. Cancer treatment is just partially effective since besides the growing incidence of new patients (90 091 in 2013) in Hungary, the mortality rate is still high (33 278 people in 2013). Revealing the diagnosis of tumorous disease causes an incredible shock for the patients, therefore oncopsychologists have to join to the oncological treatment at a very early stage. They give psychological support to both the patients and their families. By relieving stress and helping to combat the disease, the patients could accept and gradually face to the new situation. The patient keeps hoping as long as the treatment is effective and his/her health does not begin to decline. Today, in most cases the effi cacy of the treatment is just temporary and the patient will reach the stage where only the palliative and hospice care can help to maintain an acceptable but provisional quality of life. A new movement started for the terminally ill patients to keep their dignity. Hospice is an integral part of health care with 205 beds, and 75 home hospice care units (in Hungary). To get into the hospice care we describe the patients’ path including the terminal state, agony and death. We also explain the palliative medical and psychological care as well as the other forms of care at home and in the domestic or hospital care carried out within a team-work. The activity of these two types of care must be integrated and mutually supported. Finally we are going to talk about the problems that prevent the acceptable operation in this system.]

Clinical Oncology

SEPTEMBER 15, 2016

[Actual place and role of communication in Hungarian oncology]

MUSZBEK Katalin, GAAL Ilona

[The move to shared decision model from the patriarchal model of doctor-patient relationship is a communication challenge for doctors and patients as well. Communication is extremely important in Oncology, because the suggestive effect of every action of doctors and nurses is outstanding in this fi eld of healthcare. This burden has to urge professionals to self-improvement. One of the most important success of the Doctor-Patient Relationship program of the Hungarian Hospice Foundation since its launch in 2014 is the statement of two clinical centres on the importance of communication skills in everyday praxis, and engaging themselves in self-improvement. The successful cooperation also depends on patients and their care-givers not just on professionals. To gain all the necessary information is a learning process for them; even as to fi nd out the depth of information and decision level they wish. The patient who is satisfied with his or her own communication in healthcare is less distressed than the one who feels like adrifting. That gives the sense of achievement to professionals as well.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

FEBRUARY 28, 2016

[Attitude towards death, psychosomatic and pszichological status of nurses working in hospice care and oncology unit]

NAGY Rebeka, NÉMETH Anikó

[Aim of the research: The aim of the research was to examine the fear of death, the attitudes towards death, the way of processing death, related to the workplace and to assess the burn out and psychosomatic symptoms among oncology nurses and hospice care workers. Research and sampling methods: To execute our research self-developed surveys were distributed online and printed (N=116) in July-August 2015, completed with a control group, as well. For data analysis we used SPSS version 19.0 with the following statistical tests: Chi square test, independent two sample t-test, Spearman rank correlation and variance analysis (p<0,05). Results: Oncology nurses had slightly more positive attitudes towards death, with significant (p=0,034) proneness to concentrate on positive events too, in case of death of their patients, and tend to attend Bálint groups more often (p=0,017), than nurses working in other unists. In the latter group psychosomatic symptoms were more frequent (p=0,032). No significant differences (p=0,234) were found between the groups in cumulative scale of fear of death. Fear of death had great effect on appearance of psychosomatic symptoms (p=0,011) and the extent of burn out (p=0,001). Conclusions: There were no significant differences in fear of death between oncology nurses and hospise care workers.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JUNE 20, 2016

[Music therapy in hospice care]

KOLLÁR János

[The study gives a short review of some music therapy methods can be applied on the field of hospice care. Its aim is drawing the attention to the topic and enhancement of the method in the hospice movement in Hungary. The results of research works support the idea of applying both active and receptive music therapy for ensuring advantageous results in high quality care provided for dying patients. Properly chosen musical interventions applied by qualified music therapists within a therapeutic relationship are able to improve amongst others the quality of life of dying people by ensuring their inner peace, reducing the feeling of pain and anxiety and supporting their psychical-spiritual development. Besides the dying patients, hospice workers and the relatives of the patients can also experience the benefits of music therapy. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 20, 2015

[The real cost of caring for seriously ill patients - compassion fatigue or satisfaction]

KEGYE Adrienne, ZANA Ágnes, RÉVAY Edit, HEGEDÛS Katalin

[The improvement of the Hungarian hospice network and the increasing number of people dealing with the seriously ill are reflected by the annual hospice reports (2001-2013). However these reports also draw the attention to the cumulating mental and spiritual burdens of carers which can lead to fatigue and burnout. On the base of practical experience we surveyed the mental and spiritual condition of the caregivers of seriously ill patients and also reviewed research findings and the professional literature on the exposure to imperilment. The grounds of professional literature’s research were the Hungarian and international databases. We favoured studies published in Hungarian or English between 2000 and 2014 primarily on carers working in palliative and hospice service. One of the main profits of reviewing the professional literature is getting more detailed information on the mental state of professional caregivers. Relatively new element in researches is studying the relation between burnout and compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue. It includes studying of symptoms and coping strategies. These all enable a better understanding of causes and help us to support hospice carers with more effective methods to protect them from mental and spiritual exhaustion.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 21, 2008

[Interdisciplinarity, workplace stress, holistic management]

SZABÓ Nóra, SZABÓ Gábor, HEGEDÛS Katalin

[INTRODUCTIONS – The physical and psychological condition of health care professionals dealing with the seriously ill is worse than that of those caring for not seriously ill patients. This may be due to the nurses' dissatisfaction, vital exhaustion, workplace stress, social support and the degree of professional and social adjudication. The aim of the survey is to comparatively investigate two groups dealing with the seriously ill – hospice nurses and nurses caring for elderly patients. Hypothesis: hospice nurses are in a more favourable position than nurses caring for elderly patients in terms of satisfaction, vital exhaustion, social support, the degree of workplace stress and professional and social acknowledgement as well. SUBJECTS AND METHODS – The survey was performed among hospice nurses (N=25) and nurses caring for elderly patients (N=50) using a self-assessment questionnaire. The inventory comprised questions related to demographical, professional and social acknowledgement and questionnaires on satisfaction, vital exhaustion, social support and workplace stress. RESULTS – In terms of social support hospice nurses are clearly in a more favourable position than those caring for elderly patients. Workplace stress is higher among nurses caring for elderly patients than that of hospice nurses thus the adverse effects of workplace stressors will more readily appear among nurses working with the elderly. CONCLUSION – The interdisciplinary approach of hospice, the acceptance and inclusion of professionals from fields other than nursing and medicine into the practical care may promote holistic care and the acceptance and acknowledgement of nurses. The greater social support may reduce the nurses’ degree of workplace stress and thus the adverse consequences of workplace stressors. Therefore in the future interdisciplinarity should be extended, communication between specialties should be encouraged within the care for the elderly and – as a matter of fact – on each level and field of the health care system.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

FEBRUARY 22, 2007

[EFFECT OF END-OF-LIFE EDUCATION ON MEDICAL STUDENTS’ AND HEALTH CARE WORKERS’ DEATH ATTITUDE]

HEGEDÛS Katalin, ZANA Ágnes, SZABÓ Gábor

[INTRODUCTION - The aim of our research was to evaluate the effect of courses for health care workers and medical students that deal with death, dying and bereavement and that of courses on hospice care of dying patients. The goal of the courses is to make communication on death more open by exploring critical issues related to fear of death to reduce inner anxiety and to improve attitude to dying patients. PARTICIPANTS AND METHOD - Participants (n=168) completed Neimeyer and Moore's Multi-dimensional Fear of Death Scale (MFODS) and Shortened Beck Depression Questionnaire (BDI) on the first and last day of the courses. In case of health care workers a follow-up survey was also performed 2 to 3 months after the course (n=32). RESULTS - The most significant factors of fear of death are: fear for significant others, fear of the dying process and fear of premature death. Overall fear of death scores are reduced as an effect of the courses, the alteration of the components of fear of death depends on the participants’ gender, age and profession as well. Improvement was observed in both groups in attitudes that can be related to the increase of knowledge on the quality care of dying patients like fear from the process of dying and fear from conscious experience of death. CONCLUSION - Besides education containing training as well it is important to strengthen the support function of workplaces in caring for the mental health of the health care staff. Furthermore it is important during gradual education that students participate in courses that aim to achieve opened communication in the most anxiety-evoking issues.]