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Ca&Bone

NOVEMBER 10, 2007

[Decreased bone resorption in H1-receptorantagonist treated allergic children]

FERENCZ VIKTÓRIA, BOJSZKÓ ÁGNES, PALLINGER ÉVA, LAKATOS Péter, FALUS ANDRÁS, HORVÁTH CSABA

[INTRODUCTION - Histamine receptor antagonists seems to have effect on bone metabolism according to previous studies. We investigated the bone turnover in allergic children who were treated with H1-histaminreceptor (H1R) antagonists. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The biochemical bone turnover markers [β-CrossLaps (β-CTx), osteocalcin (OCN), β-CTx/OCN ratio], parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the 25(OH)vitamin D3 were determined in 37 H1Rantagonist treated multiplex allergic children and in 21 age and gender matched healthy children. The intracytoplasmatic histidine decarboxylase (HDC), histamin, and surface H1 and H2 receptors expression were assessed by flow cytometry on peripheral leukocytes. The distribution of lymphocyte subpopulation were also determined. RESULTS - The serum OCN, PTH and 25(OH)vitamin D3 levels did not differ between the healthy and the allergic groups. However, the β-CTx was lower in the H1Rantagonists treated allergic children (1090.82±80.25 pg/ml) in comparison with controls (1456.58±95.81 pg/ml; p=0.006). The β-CTx/OCN ratio was found to be lower in the H1R-antagonists treated allergic than in the controls (9.24±0.608 vs. 12.65±0.53; p=0.001). β-CTx serum level correlated with OCN in the controls (r=0.845, p<0.001) and in the H1R-antagonist treated allergic, too (r=0.519, p=0.005). Higher HDC expression and H1 receptor down regulation was found in allergic children. The CD3+/CD16-56+ T cells were in higher rate in children of control group. CONCLUSION - Decreased bone resorption was found among H1 receptor antagonist treated allergic children, which is indicated by serum markers. Therefore, bone turnover is shifted toward bone formation in the H1Rantagonist treated allergic subjects.]

Ca&Bone

FEBRUARY 14, 2007

[Higher bone fracture prevalence in postmenopausal pollen allergic women]

FERENCZ VIKTÓRIA, MÉSZÁROS SZILVIA, CSUPOR EMŐKE, TÓTH EDIT, BORS Katalin, FALUS ANDRÁS, HORVÁTH CSABA

[Our aim was to investigate whether pollen allergy can affect bone mass and fractures in postmenopausal women. A total of 125 postmenopausal pollen allergic women (mean age 61.26 years) were split into four groups: treated neither with H1 histamine receptor (H1R) antagonist nor with inhaled corticosteroid (n=43), treated only with H1R antagonist (n=53), treated both with H1R antagonist and inhaled corticosteroid (n=17), treated only with inhaled corticosteroid (n=12) for at least five years, seasonally. One-hundred non-allergic postmenopausal subjects matched for age, body mass index (BMI) and age at menopause served as controls. Overweight and obesity (25 kg/m2 ≤ BMI) were common among allergic women (76%). Allergic patients without treatment had a slightly lower bone density than their non-allergic mates. Untreated allergic had almost triple the rate of prevalent low-energy fractures (distal forearm, hip and clinical vertebral fractures: 34.9%) compared to non-allergic women (13%, χ2 p=0.003). Bone fracture occurred more often in H1R-only treated patients (30.19%) than in controls (χ2 p=0.01), however, clinical vertebral or hip fractures developed neither in those treated only with H1R antagonist nor in those who received both H1R antagonist and inhaled corticosteroid. Bone fractures were more frequent among patients with inhaled steroid treatment than among patients with a combined treatment of inhaled steroid and antihistamine (50% vs. 29.4%). BMI predicted prevalent fractures at 1.278 (95% CI, 1.047 to 1.559, p=0.016) for 1 kg/m2 increase among untreated allergic patients. In conclusion we found a high prevalence of low-energy fractures among pollen-allergic postmenopausal women, which was associated with obesity. It is possible that the H1R antagonists compensate for the negative effect of pollen-allergy and the adverse effect of inhaled corticosteroid treatment on bone fracture risk.]

AUGUST 15, 2011

USE OF DRUGS FOR GASTRIC ACID REDUCTION IN GENERAL PRACTICE

HAJNAL Ferenc

In order to facilitate (general) practitioner’s therapeutic decisions, this overview reviews advantages and disadvantages of three drug classes used for acid reduction, as to antacids, histamine 2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs), and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The possibilities and mechanisms of gastric acid reduction are detailed. This can be achieved either by neutralization of gastric acid by systemic or non-systemic antacids, or by inhibiting acid secretion by H2RAs and PPIs. PPIs are the strongest acid reducing agents indispensable in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori ulcers and Zollinger- Ellison syndrome, and they are first choice in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy, epigastric pain syndrome, and functional upper GI dyspepsia. Nonetheless, antacids and H2RAs are faster in relieving pain in the latter pain syndrome and in acute heartburn. Contraindications and adverse effects of these three drug classes are also detailed. The author has concluded that physicians’ up-to-date awareness of these compounds’ pharmacological properties contributes to their ability to tailor acid reduction therapy to patients’ individual needs. Refreshing and expanding this knowledge will finally benefit patients seen in everyday practice.

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

APRIL 21, 2009

[USE OF DRUGS FOR GASTRIC ACID REDUCTION IN GENERAL PRACTICE]

HAJNAL Ferenc

[In order to facilitate (general) practitioner’s therapeutic decisions, this overview reviews advantages and disadvantages of three drug classes used for acid reduction, as to antacids, histamine 2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs), and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The possibilities and mechanisms of gastric acid reduction are detailed. This can be achieved either by neutralization of gastric acid by systemic or non-systemic antacids, or by inhibiting acid secretion by H2RAs and PPIs. PPIs are the strongest acid reducing agents indispensable in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori ulcers and Zollinger- Ellison syndrome, and they are first choice in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy, epigastric pain syndrome, and functional upper GI dyspepsia. Nonetheless, antacids and H2RAs are faster in relieving pain in the latter pain syndrome and in acute heartburn. Contraindications and adverse effects of these three drug classes are also detailed. The author has concluded that physicians’ up-to-date awareness of these compounds’ pharmacological properties contributes to their ability to tailor acid reduction therapy to patients’ individual needs. Refreshing and expanding this knowledge will finally benefit patients seen in everyday practice.]