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Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2016

Cerebral vasomotor reactivity in fibromyalgia patients and its relationship to central neuropathic pain

GULER Sibel, KURTOGLU S. Hakan, KEHAYA Sezgin, PAMUK Nuri, CELIK Yahya

Background - Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, defined as the cerebral vasculature response to hypoxia, is not wellunderstood in fibromyalgia (FM) patients. This study investigated the difference in the cerebrovascular reactivity (i.e., responsiveness to hypercapnia was evaluated by use of breath- holding index) to the breath-holding index (BHI) between patients with fibromyalgia and a group of normal controls. Methods - The study included 40 FM patients and 40 healthy subjects. Cerebrovascular reactivity was evaluated using the BHI, which is a nonaggressive, well-tolerated, real-time, reproducible screening method to study cerebral haemodynamics. Insonation depth and basal velocity were symmetrical and not significantly different between the two groups (p>0.05). All patients completed the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), visual analogue scale (VAS), and the somatization subscale of the SCL-90-R symptom checklist. Results - The BHI ranged from 0.30 to 2.20 (mean 1.11±0.45) in the FM patients and 1.10 to 2.80 (mean 1.90±0.35) in the control group (p<0.001). Disease duration and right BHIaverage and left BHIaverage values exhibited a significant negative correlation (r=-0.877; p<0.001, r=-0.842; p<0.001, respectively). As pain and fatigue scores increased, the right BHIaverage and left BHIaverage values decreased (r=-0.431; p=0.005, r=-0.544; p<0.001, r=-0.341; p=0.031, r=-0.644; p<0.001, respectively). Conclusions - BHI values showed that cerebrovascular reactivity in FM patients decreased in comparison to healthy individuals. BHI decreased as disease duration and severity increased. Cerebrovascular reactivity decreased in FM patients, and this phenomenon should be accepted as an abnormality. Additionally, this outcome may have been the result of a mechanism responsible for central neuropathic pain.

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 20, 2001

[Pathomechanism, symptoms, differential diagnosis and therapy of fibromyalgia]

KELEMEN Judit

[Fibromyalgia is a chronic, non-inflammatory pain syndrome characterised by diffuse muscle pain and increased tenderness of specific tender points. The exact cause or pathomechanism of the disease is unknown. In the background, nociception and the pain processing pathways of the central nervous system are suspected as dysfunctional. The disease occurs primarily in middle-aged women. Occurence of fibromyalgia is between 1-4%, increasing up to 20% in a rheumatology clinic. In Canada, the cost of treatment of fibromyalgia was 350 million $ in 1993. Unfortunately, in Hungary no similar data is available. It is frequently joined by different vegetative and functional symptoms. One characteristic feature is insomnia, causing typical morning fatigue in patients. Effective therapy has yet to be found, although successful treatment may be achieved with drug therapy (amitryptilin), psychotherapy and aerobics with supplemental electro- and hydrotherapy. Patient education and involvement is also important for good therapeutic results and for the ability to return to work as soon as possible.]