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Clinical Oncology

MAY 10, 2015

[Invasive endoscopy in oncology]

MADÁCSY László

[Recent advances in interventional gastrointestinal endoscopy have led to a large variety of new diagnostic and minimally invasive endoscopic surgical procedures in oncological patients. Endoscopic ultrasound with the possibility of fi ne needle aspiration is currently one of the most accurate imaging technology for adequate staging of gastrointestinal cancers including oesophageal, gastric, rectal and pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection offers a minimal invasive endoscopic treatment modality as an alternative for laparoscopic surgery for patients with early intramucosal neoplasias, fl at adenomas and laterally spreading tumors of the oesophagus, stomach, duodenum and colorectum. Self-expandable metal stents are now readily available for endoscopic palliation of different type of malignant gastrointestinal obstructions including oesophageal, duodenal, colonic and biliary stenosis. These recent developments of interventional gastrointestinal endoscopy lead to more precise and accurate tumor staging and more effective oncological therapy for patients with gastrointestinal cancers.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 21, 2004

[DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPY OF ACUTE BLEEDINGS FROM GASTRODUODENAL ULCERS; PROPHYLAXIS OF STRESS ULCER]

RÁCZ István

[Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a life threatening condition. Almost 90% of the acute bleeding episodes originate from the upper gastrointestinal tract with a 5-10% mortality rate. Emergency endoscopy is capable to detect the bleeding source offering the chance of endoscopic therapy as well. Injecting epinephrine in a 1:10000 diluted solution into the mucosa surrounding the ulcer is the generally used endoscopic haemostatic method. In ulcer bleeding cases permanent protonpump- inhibitor infusion for 72 hours is the therapy of choice to increase gastric pH and for the stabilization of the coagulum covering the ulcers. Mortality can be decreased by surgery performed in an early elective manner. The most important aim of gastroenterological treatment in ulcer bleeders is to avoid the rebleeding episodes which increase the mortality. Acute bleedings resulting from stress ulcers are typical complications in patients undergoing major surgery and require intensive care unit treatment. The mortality rate of stress ulcer bleeders can reach or even exceed 50%. Occasionally stress ulcers have a large ulcer like appearance but in most of the cases they have an erosive confluent formation. For the prophylaxis of the stress ulcer development and bleeding an effective inhibition of gastric acid secretion is recommended in the perioperative period as well as during the intensive care. Considering gastroenterological aspects protonpump- inhibition therapy offers the most effective protection of gastric mucosal barrier by increasing gastric pH. Despite sucralfate is being frequently used, the recommended stress ulcer prophylactic therapy is permanent PPI (pantoprazole or omeprazole) infusion in a dose of 8 mg/hours. With this prophylactic medication for 48-72 hours stress ulcers can be prevented in most of the cases without any significant adverse event.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

FEBRUARY 21, 2008

[Management of bleeding from oesophageal and gastric varices]

JÓZSA Andrea, SZÉKELY Iván, SIMON János, MÁHR Árpád, HORVÁTH László, HORVÁTH Andrea, FEJES Roland, SZÉKELY András, SZABÓ Tamás, MADÁCSY László

[INTRODUCTION – Variceal haemorrhage from the oesophageal or gastric wall is a major cause of death in patients with chronic liver disease. Over the past two decades many new treatment modalities have been introduced in the management of variceal bleeding, such as emergency endoscopy, band ligation and postintervention observation of the bleeding patients in subintensive care units. This study presents the results of state-of-the-art therapy applied in our department, comparing them to published data. PATIENTS AND METHODS – Clinical records of patients with variceal haemorrhage admitted to our department between January 1st 2001 and December 31st 2004 were reviewed. Six-week mortality, incidence of recurrent bleeding, transfusion requirement and length of hospital stay were the main parameters analysed. RESULTS – A total of 228 admissions (191 patients) due to variceal bleeding were recorded in the study period. Cirrhosis was of alcoholic origin in 92% of patients. Upper endoscopy was performed in 94% of patients within 4 hours and endoscopic therapy was also applied in all but 7 patients. Octreotide was administered in 4 patients, and portosystemic shunt was performed in 1 patient. Primary endoscopic haemostasis was achieved in 85% of cases, while rebleeding rate was 31%. The mean length of total hospital stay was 10.6 days, including an average of 2.6 days in subintensive care units. The mean transfusion requirement was 3.75 units of packed red cells. Six-week mortality rate was 14.9%. CONCLUSION – In comparison to international data, the six-week mortality rate among our patients was substantially lower than that in earlier reports, and nearly equals with recent leading results.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

OCTOBER 20, 2005

[RIGHT HEMICOLECTOMY FOR SUBMUCOUS LIPOMA CAUSING PARTIAL BOWEL OBSTRUCTION]

SVÉBIS Mihály, BORI Rita, KOCSIS Lajos, PAP-SZEKERES József, CSERNI Gábor

[INTRODUCTION - Submucous lipomas are rare tumors of the colon and may be misdiagnosed as cancer because of their exophytic, polypoid growth and threatening bowel obstruction. CASE REPORT - A protruding, ulcerated and firm tumor preventing the investigation of the coecum was found by endoscopy in the ascending colon of a 50-year-old woman, who was subsequently operated on. The preoperative biopsy revealed only necrotic debris. Right hemicolectomy was performed because of threatening bowel obstruction and the presumed diagnosis of cancer. The tumor proved to be a 4 cm-large pedunculated submucosal lipoma. CONCLUSION - Despite recent diagnostic developments and the availability of better tools for the preoperative diagnosis of colonic lipomas, these tumors may still be misdiagnosed as carcinomas. Several circumstances contradict malignant dignity, such as: the relative circumscription of the mass, the trophic and only partial ulceration of the surface which is covered by normal mucosal layer elsewhere. To avoid unnecessary radicality in treatment, colon tumors with an uncertain preoperative diagnosis should undergo further diagnostic steps in order to clarify their nature. This could allow a more optimal therapeutic planning.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 20, 2010

[Pancreatology in practice: acute pancreatitis]

TAKÁCS Tamás

[Acute pancreatitis requires various diagnostic and treatment procedures. The clinical picture of acute pancreatitis is diverse, ranging from mild abdominal pain or dyspepsia to severe, lifethreatening multiorgan failure or sepsis. Most cases of pancreatitis result in a mild/edematous inflammation of the pancreas, whereas the remaining 15-20 percent results in severe necrotising pancreatitis with a mortality rate as high as 10-30 percent, although imaging diagnostics, operative endoscopy and intensive internal and surgical therapy have improved significantly in the past few years. Quick and accurate diagnosis of the disease is required for early therapeutic intervention. For example, we know that in cases of biliary acute pancreatitis an early (within 24-48 hours following the onset of symptoms) endoscopic sphincterotomy and stone extraction significantly improve the prognosis of the disaese. It is also important to introduce an adequate perfusion/rehydration therapy and a simultaneous enteral feeding introduced as soon as possible to avoid the superinfection of the pancreatic necrosis. Therefore, when reviewing the epidemiological characteristics, pathophysiology, up-to-date diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of the disease, we emphasise early interventions. We also highlight the importance of patient care and follow-up checks after an incident of acute pancreatitis.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 16, 2007

[MANAGEMENT OF GASTROINTESTINAL DISEASES DURING PREGNANCY]

NOVÁK János, TAKÁCS Tamás, ÚJSZÁSZY László, BENE László, OLÁH Attila, RÁCZ István

[Medical treatment of gastrointestinal diseases has developed dramatically in the past 10 years. However, management of gastrointestinal disorders in pregnancy is still a serious challenge and requires special expertise. This paper provides recommendations on the indications of gastrointestinal endoscopy and treatment options based on the best available evidence, primarily from large retrospective studies and case reports. Currently there are no generally applicable, widely accepted, evidence-based guidelines available on the treatment of pregnant women. The risks of the gastrointestinal disease versus those of the medications used to treat it should be considered with regard to the health of both the mother and the foetus in each individual case. The risks and benefits of treatment and the consequences of withholding treatment should be discussed with the patient, the obstetrician and any other clinicians involved, and should be carefully documented.]

Hungarian Radiology

OCTOBER 20, 2004

[Esophageal perforation in pneumectomized patient]

SZÁNTÓ Dezső, SZŰCS Gabriella, DITRÓI Edit

[INTRODUCTION - In 58 per cent of cases the fistulas and perforations are developing in middle third part of the esophagus. CASE REPORT - A 58 year old male patient's left lung was surgically removed due to drug-resistant actinomycosis. The pneumectomy has induced mediastinal dislocation and fibrothorax. Six years later the patient complained of odyno-dysphagia and of swallowing cough. On chest plain film we observed left-sided hydrothorax and barium swallows showed perforation of esophagus at the ipsilateral side. Esophageal adenocarcinoma and exudative pleuritis were confirmed by endoscopy and by histology following thoracocentesis. CONCLUSION - In case of pneumectomized patient with swallowing cough, dysphagy and recently development of pleural fluid collection the diagnosis of esophageal perforation is likely. The pleural pain is usually missing due to postoperative indurative pleurisy.]