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Clinical Neuroscience

DECEMBER 20, 2008

[Pneumococcal meningitis in children - 9 1/2-year-experience at Szent László hospital, Budapest, Hungary ]

IVÁDY Balázs, LIPTAI Zoltán, ÚJHELYI Enikő, BALÁZS György

[Background and objective - No recent publications are available about pneumococcal meningitis in Hungarian children. The aim of this study was to collect data of epidemiological, clinical and prognostic features of pneumococcal meningitis in children treated at Szent László Hospital, Budapest, Hungary. Methods - We conducted a retrospective review of medical charts and follow-up records of patients aged 1 to 18 years admitted to our Pediatric and Pediatric Intensive Care Units due to pneumococcal meningitis between 1st Jan 1998 and 30th Jun 2007. Results - 31 children with 34 cases of pneumococcal meningitis were admitted to our hospital in the study period. Two children developed recurrent illness. The mean age was 6 years, 26% were under 1 year of age. The mean duration of hospital stay was 21 days, 97% required intensive care. Frequent clinical symptoms were fever (100%), nuchal rigidity and vomiting (78%), altered mental status (71%), Kernig's and Brudzinski's signs (58%) and seizures (41%). Otitis media, sinusitis, mastoiditis were present in 44%, 58%, 41%, respectively. Subdural effusion, parenchymal cerebral lesion and sinus thrombosis were documented in 5, 3 and 2 cases, respectively. One third of the patients recieved ceftriaxon, two thirds were administered ceftriaxon and vancomycin. Adjunctive therapy with dexamethason was given to 91% of the children. 70% of patients required mechanical ventillation. 9 patients (25%) required endoscopic sinus surgery. In 13 cases (38%) mastoidectomy, in 5 children (15%) neurosurgery was performed. The case fatality rate was 23.5%. 8 (23.5%) patients had mild or moderate, 1 child (3%) developed severe neurological sequelae. Conclusion - Pneumococcal meningitis in children remains a source of substantial morbidity and mortality in childhood. The long hospital stay, the frequent need for intensive care and severe neurologic sequelae emphasize the importance of early diagnosis, early treatment and prevention with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

OCTOBER 20, 2010

[Concomitant occurrence of multiple myeloma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma]

RADVÁNYI Mónika, ILLÉS Árpád, MÉHES Gábor, KAJTÁR Béla, FAZAKAS Ferenc, GARAI Ildikó, GERGELY Lajos

[We report a case of a 50-year-old male patient, in whom the coexistence of multiple myeloma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma was confirmed. In December 2007, the patient was admitted to the department of internal medicine with fatigue resulting from mild anemia. A tumor of the left testis was discovered, and after semicastration diffuse large B cell lymphoma was diagnosed by histopathological analysis (clinical stage: II/EB). Examination of the bone marrow revealed a plasmocytic infiltrate of 60%, while 36.1 g/l IgG-kappa paraprotein was found in the peripheric blood, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of multiple myeloma (Durie-Salmon stage: I). The patient received six cycles of rituximab- CHOP-21 chemotherapy for diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Following a transient improvement, the multiple myeloma showed progression, therefore we switched to VTD protocol (bortezomib, thalidomid, dexamethason). The patient underwent high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Both hematologic diseases showed complete remission. Both tumour samples were tested for immunoglobulin heavy-chain rearrangement by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequence analysis, according to which the possibility for clonal relationship between multiple myeloma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma could not be confirmed.]