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Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

AUGUST 30, 2016

[The evolution of skull reconstruction surgical techniques and it’s impact on patient’s care and the effect on patients from the nursing perspective]

VARGEK Anikó

[Background: Facts support that decompressive craniectomy allaviates life-threatening acute high intracranial pressure and it is performed worldwide. Less attention has been paid to the late negative consequences of the widely open cranium. Hence there is a need for timely closure of the defect and precise cranioplasty. Objective: The goal of the present study was to compare the clinical results and patient care data gained by a novel cranioplasty method, the so called computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technique, versus conventional operative procedures. Patients and Methods: Seventy patients were operated on by conventional reconstructive methods (n=70) in our department between 2004 and 2006. These patients served as the control group. Sixty patients had got cranioplasty with individually prepared cranial implants using the CAD/CAM technique (n=60) in 2011 to 2013. The total number of the investigated patient population was n=130. Age distribution of the group varied from 17 to 80. Retrospective neurological and patient care data were collected and compared at the two surgical technique. Results: More precise coverage of the cranial defect and acceptable cosmetic result were achieved in every case operated on with the CAD/CAM surgical technique. The ratio of patients with persistent vegetative-state decreased, and the neurological outcome improved following surgery using the CAD/CAM method. The patient care was easier and rehabilitation procedure was more favourable at the CAD/CAM population. Iatrogenic infection and wound- healing complications were less frequent at the department between 2011 and 2013. The quality of patient care have been improving considerably by regular education and continuous development of nursing standard. Patients need for hospital stay decreased, therefore health economic aspects and cost-benefit ratio improved at the Department of Neurosurgery in the Péterfy Hospital. Conclusion: This study demonstrates an improvement in neurological outcome and easier patient care following CAD/CAM reconstructive surgery of cranial defects in status of normalized intracranial pressure. Results support the extended use of the method in the XXI. Century. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2016

Syndrome of trephined-underestimated and poorly understood complication after decompressive craniectomy

LÁNG József, GANAU Mario, PRISCO Lara, BOZSIK Krisztina, BANCZEROWSKI Péter

Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is still a matter of debate, with a numerous complications as expansion of haemorrhagic contusions, external cerebral herniation, subdural hygromas, post-traumatic hydrocephalus (HC). The often overlooked “syndrome of the trephined” (ST) as a delayed complication of DC also known as sinking skin flap sy initially described in 1939.ST is characterised by the neurological changes associated with alteration of the pressure/volume relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP), volume of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood, and brain tissue in patients with large bone defects. This review aims at elucidating the mechanisms responsible for the development of ST, and providing useful tips and red-flag signs for healthcare professionals involved with care of post DC patients. Symptoms identified on time could help to develop appropriate treatment strategies for this suddenly deteriorating, but possible reversible condition. Although the treatment strategy is straightforward, calling for a prompt cranioplasty, the correction of HC through CSF diversion devices might require a lengthy optimisation period. Continuous changes in the setting of the shunting systems or spinal tap might lead to dangerous swinging of the midline structures causing further neurological deterioration. Thus, finding the right balance in terms of clinical management often represents a significant challenge.

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2015

[Treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture with PMMA augmented pedicle screw fixation]

PADÁNYI Csaba, MISIK Ferenc, PAPP Zoltán, VITANOVICS Dusan, BALOGH Attila, VERES Róbert, LIPÓTH László, BANCZEROWSKI Péter

[Background - Over the last few decades many innovative operation technique were developed due to the increase of porotic vertebral fractures. These new techniques aim to reach the required stability of the vertebral column. In case of significant instability, spinal canal stenosis or neural compression, decompressive intervention may be necessary, which results in further weakening of the column of the spine, the minimal invasive percutan vertebroplasty is not an adequate method to reach the required stability, that is why insertion of complementary pedicular screws is needed. Considering the limited screw-fixing ability of the porotic bone structure, with this new technique we are able to reach the appropriate stability of cement-augmented pedicle screws by dosing cement carefully through the screws into the vertebral body. We used this technique in our Institute in case of 12 patients and followed up the required stability and the severity of complications. Methods - Fifteen vertebral compression fractures of 12 patients were treated in our Institute. Using the classification proposed by Genant et al. we found that the severity of the vertebral compression was grade 3 in case of 13, while grade 2 in case of two fractures. The average follow up time of the patients was 22 months (12-39), during this period X-ray, CT and clinical control examinations were taken. During the surgery the involved segments were localised by using X-ray and after the exploration the canulated screws were put through the pedicles of the spine and the vertebral body was filled through the transpedicular screws with bone cement. Depending on the grade of the spinal canal stenosis, we made the decompression, vertebroplasty or corpectomy of the fractured vertebral body, and the replacement of the body. Finally the concerned segments were fixed by titanium rods. Results - In all cases the stenosis of spinal canal was resolved and the bone cement injected into the corpus resulted in adequated stability of the spine. In case of six patients we observed cement extravasation without any clinical signs, and by one patient - as a serious complication - pulmonary embolism. Neurological progression or screw loosening were not detected during the follow up period. Part of the patients had residual disability after the surgery due to their older ages and the problem of their rehabilitation process. Conclusion - After the right consideration of indications, age, general health condition and the chance of successful rehabilitation, the technique appears to be safe for the patients. With the use of this surgical method, the stability of the spine can be improved compared to the preoperative condition, the spinal canal stenosis can be solved and the neural structures can be decompressed. The severity of complications can be reduced by a precise surgical technique and the careful use of the injected cement. The indication of the surgical method needs to be considered in the light of the expected outcome and the rehabilitation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2012

[Rare angioproliferative tumors mimicking aggressive spinal hemangioma with epidural expansion]

KULCSÁR Zsolt, VERES Róbert, HANZÉLY Zoltán, BERENTEI Zsolt, MAROSFŐI Miklós, NYÁRY István, SZIKORA István

[Background and purpose - We present two cases of angio-proliferative tumors that were misdiagnosed and treated as typical hemangiomas with epidural expansion. Materials and methods - Two middle-aged women presented with symptoms and radiological signs characteristic for aggressive hemangioma with epidural expansion. In the first case preoperative embolization and decompressive surgery with open transpedicular vertebroplasty was performed. Within less than a year, epidural recurrence of the tumor prompted for radical excision and corpectomy. The diagnosis after the histological studies and the further clinical evolution was metastasizing leiomyomatosis. No further recurrence occured during the next 6 years. In the second case percutaneous vertebroplasty was performed and complicated by epidural polymethyl-methacrylcate (PMMA) leakage, requiring urgent decompressive surgery. Histological study of the lesion raised the possibility of myopericytoma. This was confirmed 16 months later when complete vertebrectomy was performed due to severe epidural propagation of the recurring tumor. No further recurrence occurred in next the two years. Conclusions - Rare angio-proliferative tumors, like benign metastasizing leiomyoma and myopericytoma radiologically may resemble aggressive vertebral hemangiomas of the spine. Unlike hemangiomas, such tumors require radical removal due to their likely recurrence. As imaging studies may not be able to completely exclude such pathologies, bone biopsy and thorough histopathological studies are warranted prior to the therapeutic decision.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 20, 2005

[A NEW SURGICAL TECHNIQUE FOR THE TREATMENT OF SEVERE BRAIN EDEMA OF TRAUMATIC ORIGIN - RESULTS OF THE APPLICATION OF VASCULAR TUNNELS]

CSÓKAY András

[INTRODUCTION - Decompressive craniectomy with durotomy is a well known, although strongly disputed method of treatment in cases of brain trauma, brain swelling and during persisting danger of fatal incuneation. It is not without significance that literature mentions this method only as an option. Although the method successfully diminishes the ICP this can still result in a partial or total lesion occuring in the herniating part of the brain. The actual cause of these symptoms is found in the blockage of the veins and arteries, caused by the shear and the pressure forces between the dural edge and brain tissue. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The new surgical technique consists of the creation of a vascular tunnel around the main cortical veins and the arteries of herniated brain. 36 patients have been operated on with this method. We used historical control (28 patients treated conservatively, 20 patients treated with decompressive craniotomy). RESULTS - A retrospective comparison was performed and the results in connection with the mortality and morbidity rate was promising. CONCLUSION - With the help of our new technique we managed not only to reduce the ICP greatly but we could also avoid further vascular laesion. This is due to the fact that we can assure the circulation and veinous drainage of the herniated part of the brain. This method can be used in any severe edematous state generated by other causes.]

Clinical Neuroscience

APRIL 20, 2002

[New methods in stroke intensive therapy: hemicraniectomy in patients with complete middle cerebral artery infarction and treatment of intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage with urokinase]

KAKUK Ilona, MAJOR Ottó, GUBUCZ István, NYÁRY István, NAGY Zoltán

[Life-threatening, complete middle cerebral artery infarction occurs in up to 10% of all stroke patients. The “malignant media occlusion” is an infarction occupying more than 50% of middle cerebral artery territory. The malignant, space-occupying supratentorial ischemic stroke is characterised by a mortality rate of up to 80%. Several reports indicate, that hemicraniectomy in this situation can be life-saving. Hemicraniectomy increases cerebral perfusion pressure and optimises retrograde perfusion via the leptomeningeal collateral vessels. A case of a patient is presented, having progressive neurological deterioration due to massive cerebral infarctions. The patient rehabilitation was successful. Decompressive surgery is life saving and can also give acceptable functional recovery. Hemorrhagic stroke is due to stroke in 15% of cases and in 10%, it is “spontaneous” intracerebral hematoma. The intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage represents one of the most devastating types of stroke associated with high morbidity and mortality. The 30-day mortality rate is 35% to 50% and most survivors are left with a neurological disability. The value of surgical therapy is debatable. The aspiration and urokinase therapy of the hematoma of intracerebral hemorrhage could improve final neurological outcome. Spontaneous, nontraumatic intraventricular hemorrhage frequently carries a grave prognosis. A large part of morbidity after intraventricular hemorrhage is related to intracranial hypertension from hydrocephalus. One patient presented had intracerebral hemorrhage and another had intraventricular hemorrhage treated with urokinase. Rapid and extensive reduction in the amount of intracerebral and intraventricular blood occurred. Urokinase lysis is safe and can be a potentially beneficial intervention in intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. By performing decompressive craniectomy, the neurologists of stroke departments and intensive care units with the neurosurgeons will have to play major role in the management of stroke patients.]