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Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

[The quality of life of the cluster headache patients during the active phase of the headache]

DIÓSSY Mária, BALOGH Eszter, MAGYAR Máté, GYÜRE Tamás, CSÉPÁNY Éva, BOZSIK György, ERTSEY Csaba

[Introduction - Cluster headache (CH), which affects 0.1% of the population, is one of the most painful human conditions: despite adequate treatment, the frequent and severe headaches cause a significant burden to the patients. According to a small number of previous studies, CH has a serious negative effect on the sufferers’ quality of life (QOL). In the current study, we set out to examine the quality of life of the CH patients attending our outpatient service between 2013 and 2016, using generic and headache-specific QOL instruments. Methods - A total of 42 CH patients (16 females and 26 males; mean age: 39.1±13.5 years) completed the SF-36 generic QOL questionnaire and the headache- specific CHQQ questionnaire (Comprehensive Headache- related Quality of life Questionnaire), during the active phase of their headache. Their data were compared to those of patients suffering from chronic tension type headache (CTH) and to data obtained from controls not suffering from significant forms of headache, using Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results - During the active phase of the CH, the patients’ generic QOL was significantly worse than that of normal controls in four of the 8 domains of the SF-36 instrument. Apart from a significantly worse result in the ‘Bodily pain’ SF-36 domain, there were no significant differences between the CH patients’ and the CTH patients’ results. All the dimensions and the total score of the headache-specific CHQQ instrument showed significantly worse QOL in the CH group than in the CTH group or in the control group. Conclusion - Cluster headache has a significant negative effect on the quality of life. The decrease of QOL experienced by the patients was better reflected by the headache-specific CHQQ instrument than by the generic SF-36 instrument. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 20, 2020

[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 10, 2019

[New perspectives in the treatment of lung cancer]

SZONDY Klára, BOGOS Krisztina

[In recent years, huge research is going on in the fi eld of oncology and as a result, we can see a signifi cantly longer survival in this area of medicine. Lung cancer, which has been taken places in the back for decades, it has not become a curable disease, but begins to belong to the chronic diseases. As a result of brilliant surgical technics and stereotactic radiotherapy, or as a result of changes in drug treatment, 5-year survival is not uncommon in metastatic lung cancer patients, next to relatively long progression free survive. After the third-generation cytotoxic combinations the added growth inhibition (VEGF inhibitor) maintenance therapy or continuous pemetrexed cytotoxic chemotherapy were resulted in high survival benefi ts. The fi rst real breakthrough, long progression-free survival was achieved by targeted treatment, which proved to be effective with known driver mutations. The other great result, especially in squamous cell carcinoma, was the immunotherapy, the inhibition of immune checkpoints, which effi cacy was confi rmed in adenocarcinoma also. Several studies are going on with adjuvant or neoadjuvant immunotherapy, and combined use of immunotherapy (either in combination with radiotherapy or cytotoxic chemotherapy).]

Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 10, 2018

[Medical use of marihuana especially in oncology]

VÉGH Éva

[The medical use of marijuana has gained a considerable attention among wide range of cancer patients lately in Hungary. Consequently, oncologist sare facing questions related to cannabinoids more and more in their clinical practice. This article aims to clarify some basic concepts and to give a brief introduction on the current international and national legislation on their accessibility. Numerous publications have dealt with the application of marijuana in various indications. Among the tumour related indications, the concerned studies mainly refer to chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, chronic pain, sleep disorders, anorexia and cachexia. The article also to uches upon on knowledge connected to the causal treatment of malignant tumours, which are currently limited to glioblastoma. Information on the carcinogenic potential of cannabis and information on the popularity and attitudes of American oncologists can be found in this article. This paper gives a literature review in the above mentioned themes.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

JUNE 30, 2019

[Postoperative pain management today in Hungary - Part 2 ]

LOVASI Orsolya, LÁM Judit

[According to the literature, the practice of postoperative pain relief in Hungary is an area to be developed. Postoperative pain is a key issue for patients. Surveys show that more than 59% of patients are worried about postoperative pain. Their concerns are not baseless, as recent studies have consistently shown that pain has not been properly treated after surgery. It has also been shown that postoperative pain can lead to a deterioration in the quality of life of patients. The aim of our study was to assess the degree of postoperative pain in patients and their satisfaction with pain relief. We conducted interviews based on personal inquiries with a total of 168 patients, with the involvement of certain surgical departments of three Hungarian institutions. Based on our results, we found that patients report remarkable pain after surgery, so the practice of postoperative pain relief is in many cases unsatisfactory. Comparing the results and the international literature, postoperative analgesic practice can be considered as an area to be developed. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

DECEMBER 12, 2019

[Predictive factors for ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease among hypertensive patients based on the data of the Hungarian Hypertension Registry 2011-2013-2015. Part I. Hypertensive population aged 35 to 64 years]

KÉKES Ede, PAKSY András, SZEGEDI János, JÁRAI Zoltán

[The association of hypertension with ischemic heart disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease is the greatest therapeutic challenge because these associations significantly increase mortality and deteriorate life expectancy. It is important for the clinician to clarify the predictive factors of each association for successful prevention or slowing the progression of diseases. According to the database of the Hungarian Hypertension Registry 2011-2013-2015, 11,137 men and 11,112 women with hypertension and comorbidities (CHD, diabetes, CKD) aged between 35 and 64 were analyzed for the purpose of assessing the predictive value of the traditional risk factors in co-morbidity. We analyzed the predictive weight of each variable with single- and multi-variable stepwise logistic regression, and reported Odds ratio (OR, odds ratio). In patients with hypertension aged 35-64 (male / female), the prevalence of CHD was 41.6% / 35.8%, diabetes 27.1% / 23% and KVB 16.2% / 33.8%, respectively. The chance of developing CHD is highest in hypertensive individuals (male/female) who have diabetes (OR 1.30/1.48), who are obese (OR 1.22/1.21), who smoke (OR 1.50/1.51), and whose blood pressure >140/90 mmHg (OR 1.23/1.29). The dominant predictive factors of type 2 diabetes are obesity (visceral obesity) (OR 1.46/1.49), low HDL cholesterol (OR 1.32/1.35), and high triglyceride levels (OR 1.20/1.42); in women the uric acid level also showed high odds ratio (OR 1.39). There is a significant chance of developing chronic kidney disease in hypertension in both sexes, if abnormal uric acid levels (OR 1.73/1.46) and inadequate treatment of high blood pressure (>140Hgmm SBP) (OR 1.43/1.19) are present. In women, the abnormal triglyceride level) also showed a high odd (OR 1.81).]

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 10, 2019

[Introducing a new, personalized multistep cognitive behavioral therapy for obesity]

CZEGLÉDI Edit

[Two thirds of Hungary’s adult population live with excess weight. Obesity itself is a chronic disease that is a risk factor for many other chronic diseases, and therefore adequate treatment is of public health impor­tance. Although behavioral therapy is one of the evidence-based approaches to treating obesity, its long-term effectiveness is not well-established. That is why intensive work has been done over the past decades to furth­er develop behavioral therapy. A recent example of this is a multi-step treatment program that can be implemented in a number of settings of the health care system regardless of the excess weight and the presence of comorbid conditions of obesity. This treatment program is based on classical behavioral treatments and new cognitive-behavioral treatments of obesity and, in addition to the acquisition of long-term lifestyle-changing skills, contributes to the treatment of obesity through the development of a mind-set for long-term weight control. The purpose of this study is to present the program.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 15, 2019

[The hypertensive, non-diabetic nephropathy]

LÉGRÁDY Péter

[According to the increase of the number of the hypertensive patients the prevalence of hypertensive nephropathy will increase also. According to the data in the Registry of Hungarian Society of Hypertension, in 2015 the proportion of hypertension patients with chronic kidney disease was 12.3% of the males, 39.1% of the females and generally 26.1% of all the hypertensives. In Hungary the hypertensive nephropathy was the 2nd most common condition led to chronic dialysis in 2010 and 2015 (21% and 22%). According to the Hungarian Society of Hypertension 2018 Guideline the classic inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system can decrease significantly the progression of renal function decline and the proteinuria. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 15, 2019

[Neuropathic pain: spotligth on amitriptyline]

FEHÉR Gergely, POHL Marietta, KAPUS Krisztián, GOMBOS Katalin, PUSCH Gabriella, MÁK Kornél, KOLTAI Katalin, BANK Gyula, KÓSA Gábor, VARJASI Gábor, TIBOLD Antal

[The management of neuropathic pain is a challenge both for patients and medical professioners. A novel approach is recommended for its management based on the novel neurobiological results of pain research. Multidisciplinary teams and medical consensus are required due to the variety of symptoms and concomittant psychopathology. This approach allows us to avoid extensive diagnostic and trerapeutic workups and appropiate treatment for our patients. Most extensive evidence is available for pharmacological treatment, and currently recommended first-line treatments include antidepressants (tricyclic agents and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin). The aim of our review was to collect articles focusing on the efficacy of the most widely available and cheapest tricyclic agent, amitriptyline in different neuropathic pain conditions. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2019

[Tracing trace elements in mental functions]

JANKA Zoltán

[Trace elements are found in the living organism in small (trace) amounts and are mainly essential for living functions. Essential trace elements are in humans the chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), fluorine (F), iodine (I), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), and questionably the boron (B) and vanadium (V). According to the biopsychosocial concept, mental functions have biological underpinnings, therefore the impairment of certain neurochemical processes due to shortage of trace elements may have mental consequences. Scientific investigations indicate the putative role of trace element deficiency in psychiatric disorders such in depression (Zn, Cr, Se, Fe, Co, I), premenstrual dysphoria (Cr), schizophrenia (Zn, Se), cognitive deterioration/de­mentia (B, Zn, Fe, Mn, Co, V), mental retardation (I, Mo, Cu), binge-eating (Cr), autism (Zn, Mn, Cu, Co) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (Fe). At the same time, the excess quantity (chronic exposure, genetic error) of certain trace elements (Cu, Mn, Co, Cr, Fe, V) can also lead to mental disturbances (depression, anxiety, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction, insomnia). Lithium (Li), being efficacious in the treatment of bipolar mood disorder, is not declared officially as a trace element. Due to nutrition (drinking water, food) the serum Li level is about a thousand times less than that used in therapy. However, Li level in the red cells is lower as the membrane sodium-Li countertransport results in a Li efflux. Nevertheless, the possibility that Li is a trace element has emerged as studies indicate its potential efficacy in such a low concentration, since certain geographic regions show an inverse correlation between the Li level of drinking water and the suicide rate in that area. ]