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Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Effect of maternal migraine on children’s quality of sleep

GÜNGEN Dogan Belma, YILDIRIM Ahmet, ARAS Guzey Yesim, ARAS Atılgan Bilgehan, TEKESIN Aysel, AYAZ Burcu Ayse

Backround and aim - Sleep disorders are common problems associated with migraine. These sleep disorders are known to have a debilitating impact on daily lives of migraine patients. The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of sleep disorders experienced by individuals suffering from migraine on their children as well as the presence of sleep disorders in their children. Materials and methods - This study included 96 mothers diagnosed with migraine and their 96 healthy children, and a control group formed of 74 healthy mothers and their children. Exclusion criteria were chronic systemic disease or central nervous system disease or a history of smoking/alcohol use for mothers, and chronic disease or regularly occurring headaches or recurrent abdominal pain for children. For maternal evaluation, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Migraine Disability Assessment Scale (MIDAS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Beck Depression Index (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Index (BAI) were used and for the assessment of the children’s quality of sleep, the Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) was used. The SPSS 21.0 program was employed for statistical analysis, with statistical significance set at p<0.05. Findings - The mean age of the group with migraine was 36.6±7.1 years, while that of the control group was 38.01±4.7. Mood and sleep disorders were more frequently observed in the participants with migraine (p<0.05). Sleep disorders were significantly low in children with migraineur mothers (p=0.02); and child sleep anxiety is significantly high in control group (p=0.048). Maternal BAI scores had a significant influence on their children’s quality of sleep. Discussion and conclusion - In our study, the presence of migraine-type headache in mothers was observed to have a positive effect on reducing sleep disorders in the children. Recurrent headaches of the migraineur mothers with or without sleep disorders and psychiatric comorbidities did not influence the quality of sleep in their children directly, but the sleep anxiety of the children may have had an impact on it.

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2017

[Current diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension]

SALOMVÁRY Bernadett, PÁNCZÉL Gyula, MARKIA Balázs, NAGY Gábor

[Background - Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is cha-racterized by raised intracranial pressure of unknown origin, leading to persisting visual loss if left untreated. Purpose - We assessed timing of surgery, and the efficacy and safety of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Methods - Retrospective analysis of 65 patients treated at our Neuro-ophthalmology Clinic between 2009 and 2017. Patients - We treated 15 children and 50 adults, 42 patients conservatively, and 23 surgically. The median age at presentation was 27 years for adults, 88% were obese, and 86% female. The age of children was 5-17 years, 40% were obese, and 53% girl. The commonest presentation symptom was headache in both groups (64%), followed by obscuration (33%), and double vision (22-31%). Subjective visual loss was only experienced in the surgical group (50%). The time until diagnosis was 2 weeks in both groups. However, the conservative group presented to our institute significantly earlier (3 weeks), than the surgical group (8 weeks). The follow-up time was 25 months. Results - In the conservative group papilla edema was 2D, visual acuity ≥0.7, and visual field loss was only mild. Time to cure was 3 months. In the surgical group both preoperative papilla edema (3D), and visual function were significantly worse. Indications for surgery were papilla edema, deteriorating visual function or relapse resistant to conservative treatment. Papilla edema disappeared 3 months after surgery, and visual field deficit improved significantly. We detected significant improvement in all aspects of visual function even at first neuro-ophthalmic control 4 days after surgery. However, visual acuity only improved in cases of preoperative acuity ≥0.3. Shunt revision occurred in 17%, and shunt infection in 8.5%. One patient suffered from persistent visual deterioration after surgery, and asymptomatic complication (epidural hematoma) was found in another patient. There was no surgical mortality. Conclusions - This is a curable condition with early diagnosis and adequate treatment, and persistent visual loss can be prevented. Surgery is effective and safe, close neuro-ophthalmic monitoring is mandatory for its optimal timing. Visual function of all patients can be preserved when operated on in time, whereas severe visual loss appears to be irreversible despite surgery.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

FEBRUARY 28, 2017

[Investigation of nurses eating habits]

NÉMETH Anikó

[The aim of the study: was to assess the characteristics of diet among nurses in relation to socio-demographic and workplace related factors. Methods: The survey was conducted in 2015 through a self-constructed online questionnaire. Data were analyzed with SPSS 22.0 using chi square, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Sixty percent of the 548 involved nurses are overweight. Monthly overtime correlates negatively with the number of daily meals (p=0.003) with having hot meals (p=0.022) and with the opinion about dietary habits (p=0.001). Calm meals are typical for 30%, eating vegetables, fruits and whole grain bakery products for 20% and only 24.3% drinks two litres per day. Having children has beneficial effects on dietary habits. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the majority of the nurses included are overweight and they have dissatisfactory diet. The reasons for these might be rooted in the characteristics of the job and the Hungarian eating habits.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2017

[Valproate in the treatment of epilepsy and status epilepticus]

JANSZKY József, TÉNYI Dalma, BÓNÉ Beáta

[According to Hungarian guidelines, valproate - with the exception of infants and small children as well as fertile women - is the first drug of choice in generalized and unclassified epilepsies because it is effective in most seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. It is highly effective in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Even though it is not the first-line drug in focal epilepsies, if the first-line therapy is ineffective, it is a plausible alternative as second choice therapy, owing to its different mechanism of action. If the type of epilepsy can’t be surely established, valproate is the drug of choice, as it possesses the broadest-spectrum among antiepileptic drugs. After administration of benzodiazepines, intravenously applied valproate can be a first choice therapy in all types of status epilepticus, owing to its broad-spectrum and efficacy. Valproate is the first-choice therapy in patients with glioblastoma - independently of the seizure type -, as it is likely to improve the survival rate with 2-10 months and the effectivity of chemo- and radiotherapy. Valproate is generally not suggested for fertile women, but - as it is the most effective therapy in some epilepsy syndromes -, the patient has the right to choose valproate therapy, thus undertaking the elevated risk of developmental abnormalities, for higher safety regarding seizures. If only valproate therapy owns the ability to obtain seizure freedom, then stopping its administration is not suggested, but a low dosage has to be aimed (500-600 mg/day, but not more than 1000 mg/day): according to some studies, most idiopathic generalized epilepsies can be controlled by low valproate dosage. Stopping valproate therapy in case of an ongoing pregnancy is not suggested. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

MAY 20, 2017

[Isolated systolic hypertension in children and young adults I.]

FARSANG Csaba

[Prevalence of the isolated increase in systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg with normal or low diastolic blood pressure ≤80 mmHg, is defined as isolated systolic hypertension. Its prevalence increases with age up to >90% in patients aged >90 years. Isolated systolic hypertension is also found in the young and the clinical significance of it is still debated. For the therapy, those drugs should be used which have a license for use in children: angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT-1 receptor antagonists, calcium channel blockers beta-blockers and diuretics and their combinations. The young adults with isolated systolic hypertension had a much higher risk of dying from coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease, then the normotensive individuals, and should be treated to normalise their blood pressure. In the elderly and very elderly (>80 yrs), a wealth of data from large clinical trials are available, showing the necessity of treatment mostly with drug combinations - fix-combinations are preferred for increasing the adherence / persistence to therapy. Using diuretics, ACE-inhibitors / ARBs with calcium antagonists, and when needed diuretics and beta-blockers are suggested by recent European guidelines. The target is <140 mmHg, but in octogenarians <150 mmHg. Some studies are pressing for even lower SBP (to around 120 mm Hg), but it seems to be wise to balance advantages / disadvantages, so the optimal SBP may be around 130 mmHg.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2017

Procedural learning and its consolidation in autism spectrum disorder

VIRÁG Márta, JANACSEK Karolina, BALOGH-SZABÓ Virág, CHEZAN Júlia, NÉMETH Dezsõ

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show altered learning and memory. A number of recent studies have debated whether procedural learning in ASD is intact or not. Our aim was to further assess the question of whether the implicit, non-conscious form of procedural learning in ASD children is intact or not, furthermore, how shifts towards a more explicit, attention-demanding task setting can alter this performance. We administered a modified version of the Alternating Serial Reaction Time (ASRT) Task to children with ASD and IQ- and age-matched typically developing (TD) children. The task consisted of alternating blocks of cued (explicit) and uncued (implicit probe) blocks, and was repeated after a 16-hour delay. We found that ASD and TD children showed similar sequence-specific learning in cued explicit blocks, however, on the uncued probe blocks ASD children performed better compared to TD children. After the 16-hour delay both groups showed retention of the previously acquired knowledge. Finally, when we investigated the performance in different parts of the blocks, we found that ASD children did not show an effect of fatigue by the second part of the blocks. Our results suggest that children with ASD have increased implicit procedural learning skills compared to TD children. Differences in cued (explicit) and uncued (implicit) settings indicate that children with ASD are not affected by the lack of explicit instructions in probe blocks, suggesting a resistance for changes in task settings. These findings can help in a more thorough planning of cognitive therapeutic setups for ASD children.

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

JUNE 30, 2016

Physical activity as primary prevention of metabolic syndrome

MARTINEK Lukas, TOTHOVA Valérie, KOVAROVA Maria, DUSICKOVA Tereza, KIMMER David

Metabolic syndrome is constantly discussed, together with cancer diseases, as one of the biggest threats to the 21st century. Despite the differing indicators of specific diseases behind the metabolic syndrome, it is to be understood as a very risky aspect of health. Primary prevention through life style modifications, specifically reduction of the sedentary way of life and integration of regular physical activity into daily life of children, adults and seniors is an appropriate tool of prevention of metabolic syndrome. A number of valid studies show that increasing physical motion contributes to improvement of diseases that stand behind the metabolic syndrome. However, healthy adult population of the Czech Republic shows distinctive dislike of physical activity and primary prevention is insufficiently supported both by experts dealing with this issue and at political level while secondary prevention prevails. Therefore we consider it imperative to involve more funding into programs supporting physical activity. It is also necessary to explore forms of education within the physically active life style.

Lege Artis Medicinae

AUGUST 20, 2016

[Young men’s knowledge about the human papillomavirus]

BALLA Bettina Claudia, TEREBESSY András, TÓTH Emese, BALÁZS Péter

[Introduction - Nearly the fifth of more than 100 HPV serotypes affect the anogenital region causing genital warts, penile and anal cancer. The incidence of male pathologies is lower than that of females (genital warts, vaginal, vulvar, cervical and anal cancer), however they are equally important in epidemiological terms. Methods - The aim of our questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was to assess the HPV-related knowledge of young men in 19 randomly selected high schools in Budapest. The anonymous questionnaires contained 54 items about socio-demographic and lifestyle factors, HPV-related knowledge and the attitude toward HPV vaccination. Results - We collected 530 completed questionnaires (86.74% response rate). 35.3% of the students knew that HPV was an STD and 3.2% was aware of transmission via skin contact. The majority (52.5%) linked cervical cancer to the viral infection, 7.7% linked HPV to the genital warts of females and 8.3% to the genital warts of males, 9.8% to penile cancer and 4.2% to anal cancer. 44.7% of the young men would have their future children vaccinated, while 24.5% remained uncertain. Conclusions - The young men’s knowledge about HPV was poor and they underestimated the risk of infection. This emphasizes the importance of targeted health education in this population. However, the students were mostly in favour of the HPV vaccination.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2016

[The role of zonisamide in the management of pediatric partial epilepsy]

ROSDY Beáta, KOLLÁR Katalin, MÓSER Judit, MELLÁR Mónika

[In our review we discuss the group of approved antiepileptic drugs for children in Hungary. We cite the results of the review conducted by the International League Against Epilepsy on antiepileptic drug efficacy and effectiveness as initial monotherapy for newly diagnosed epileptic seizures and syndromes in pediatric age group. 25% of pediatric epilepsy is therapy resistant, so we further need new drugs, which must be investigated according to the rules of the European Medicine Agency. The ethical dilemmas of childhood drug studies lead to the situation that the new antiepileptic drugs, approved as monotherapy in adult epilepsies, are in the majority just in add-on regimen tested in pediatric patients. As clinicians we appreciate open label extension safety studies. An old-new antiepileptic drug in Europe is zonisamide. Though it was approved for first line monotherapy in pediatric and adult patients with partial and generalised epilepsy in 1989 in Japan, the European Medicine Agency licensed its use as adjunctive therapy in children aged 6 years or older with partial seizures (with or without secondary generalisation) just in 2013. The results of the openlabel extension study appeared in 2014. The mean dose received was 7.5 mg/kg/day. During the open label phase 11% of the patients achieved seizure freedom and it was maintained throughout the study. The drug was generally well tolerated. The most frequently reported treatment-related adverse events were decreased weight (6%), decreased appetite (4%), and headache (2%). No new or unexpected side effects emerged. In conclusion oral zonisamide as adjunctive therapy in pediatric patients aged 6-17 years with partial seizures demonstrated an acceptable safety and tolerability profile and efficacy over a period at least 1 year. So it is a good treatment option in this population.]