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Lege Artis Medicinae

APRIL 18, 2020

[The relationship of traumatic experiences and eating disorders – therapeutical options]

KOVÁCS-TÓTH Beáta, TÚRY Ferenc

[In the etiology of eating disorders (espe­cially bulimia nervosa and binge eating) traumatic experiences (sexual, physical, emo­tional abuse, neglect) play an important role. Traumatization can have a serious impact, which is influenced by the parameters of the traumatization, risk and protective factors, and the resiliency of the traumatized patient. The consequences may lead to the development of specific psychiatric and somatic disorders, and may cause lifetime revictimization. The exploration of data related to the traumatization is essential in eating disorders as well. If traumatic expericences can be detected in the back­ground of eating disorders, the targeted therapy of eating disorders while applying its specific elements should also follow the guide­lines of the general trauma-therapy. Providing safety in therapeutical relation­ship is fundamental. The therapeutic options are extensive. Along with psychodynamically oriented therapies, the newer methods based on cognitive-behavioral therapy (e.g., dialectic behavior therapy, integrative cognitive analytic therapy) are also proposed. Hyp­no­therapy can also be useful. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[Attachment as a predictor of risk for eating disorders on a representative hungarian adult sample]

SZALAI Dömötör Tamás, CZEGLÉDI Edit

[Background and purpose – Many studies confirm the relationship between attachment disturbances and (the severity of) eating disorders, however among them only one Hungarian study can be found. The exact predisposing traits of attachment and the strength of relationship is still uncleared. Our aim was to explore these aspects. Methods – Study was based on a cross-sectional nationally representative survey, called „Hungarostudy 2013” (N=2000, 46.9% males, mean age 46.9 years, SD=18.24 years). Measures: Sociodemographic and self-reported anthropometric data (weight and height), short Hungarian version of Relationship Scale Questionnaire, SCOFF questionnaire and short Hungarian version of Beck Depression Inventory. Results – The frequency of risk for eating disorders (anorexia or bulimia nervosa) was 3.9% (N=76) among the respondents (N=1860). Attachment anxiety was significantly higher in the risk for eating disorders group (t(1888)=-3.939, p<0.001), and significantly predicted the risk for eating disorders after adjusting for the potential background variables (OR=1.09, p=0.040). Detachment was not a significant predictor of risk for eating disorders (OR=0.98, p=0.515). Younger age (OR=0.97, p<0.001), higher level of depression (OR=1.09, p<0.001) and higher body mass index (OR=1.08, p<0.001) were also significant cross-sectional predictors of risk for eating disorders. The explained variance of the model was 10.7%. Conclusion – The study supported, that higher attachment anxiety is associated with the increased risk of eating disorders, with a possible therapeutic relevance. Assessment of attachment’s further aspects and creating multivariable models are required for more thorough understanding and optimising of intervention points.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

[Hungarian adaptation of a short eating disorder questionnaire (SCOFF)]

DUKAY-SZABÓ Szilvia, SIMON Dávid, VARGA Márta, SZABÓ Pál, TÚRY Ferenc, RATHNER Günther

[Aim - Eating disorders are becoming an increasingly relevant health issue, therefore the fast and accurate screening of people at risk is of great practical importance. The aim of SCOFF questionnaire is to assess this risk and the extent to which a person is affected, by using five simple yes or no questions. The objective of our study was to assess the validity of the Hungarian version of the test Methods - 777 medical students (210 men, 567 women, mean age 22.3±2.33 years) participated in the survey. The online questionnaire contained anthropometric data, the Eating Behaviour Severity Scale and, beside the SCOFF, the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Results - The SCOFF is excellent at screening clinical eating disorders. Its sensitivity was 100% and specificity 85.1%. It is less efficient at detecting subclinical cases, but it does not show worse results than EDI. According to the data SCOFF is better at identifying more serious cases. Applying on the same sample SCOFF had higher sensitivity and lower specificity than EDI. Discussion - SCOFF is suitable for primary screening of eating disorders with a non-diagnostic purpose, taken two “yes” answers out of five as the critical margin, specified by the authors.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 20, 2019

[Gynecological correlations of eating disorders]

GALIGER-DOBOS Kitty, TÚRY Ferenc

[In recent decades, the incidence of eating disorders (its two major forms are anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa) has increased, their course has been delayed, and their complications are becoming more frequent and severe. Eating disorders cannot only damage physical and mental health but also affect reproductive health, future mothers and their children. Understanding the biological and psychosocial factors that explain the gynecological conditions related to eating disorders is essential regarding fertility and pregnancy. The present review summarizes data published from 2000 about the gynecological effects of eating disorders. In daily practice, the multidisciplinary collaboration is particularly important to pro­vide women with eating disorders with comprehensive care. The appropriate information of women who plan to have children is essential in order to increase the likelihood of conception and reduce the risk of miscarriage. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018

[The liaison between internal medicine and psychiatry can be life-saving in the treatment of severe anorexia nervosa]

SZÉNYEI Gábor, BENE László, TÚRY Ferenc

[INTRODUCTION - In the severe forms of anorexia nervosa hospitalization may be required, and the somatic treatment is provided in a department of internal medicine. In such cases, collaboration between internist and psychiatrist is essential. Psycho­logical support is necessary even in the period of nutritional rehabilitation. This can be applied in the framework of consultation-liaison psychiatry. After the initial weight gain providing psychotherapy in an outpatient setting is fundamental. In the case of anorexic patients who maintain a close relationship with the family, family therapy is the most effective treatment. CASE REPORT - A 26-year old female patient with anorexia was hospitalized in a department of internal medicine after an extreme emaciation, her body mass index was 11.6. During this period there was a psychiatric consultation involving the fa-ther of the patient as well. Her body weight increased, and outpatient family therapy was initiated. Fifteen family sessions were conducted in nine months, with special focus on the separation-individuation process. At the end of the therapy a full remission could be observed, with a normal body weight, and her periods returned. After a four-month follow-up her state was stable, and she got married. CONCLUSION - Interdisciplinary collaboration can be cardinal when somatic and psychological disorders are interwoven. The role of family therapy is crucial in those cases where emotional separation from the family of origin is difficult, even if the patient does not live with the parents any longer. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 02, 2018

[The role of fathers in the family therapy of eating disorders, with special regard to mosaic families]

TÚRY Ferenc, SZENTES Annamária

[Eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa) are the typical forms of modern disorders of civilization. In the therapy of young (below age of twenty years) patients the family therapy can play a decisive role. During family therapy, in the case of mosaic families (newly organized families after divorce and second marriage) it is a frequent question, which family members should be involved into the therapeutical sessions: the biological parents, or the members of the actual families. In this paper two cases are reported where mosaic families were consulted. In the family therapy the new distribution of parental roles, the strengthening of the paternal responsibility of the foster-father were crucial in the families. In both cases a full remission occurred. As a conclusion we can state that during family therapy of eating disordered patients - and supposedly in other psychosomatic disorders - in the case of mosaic families the involvement of the actual family members, and the strengthening of the parental role can be an important factor in the therapeutical efficacy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2016

[Eating disorders and pregnancy - a review of literature]

DUKAY-SZABÓ Szilvia, VARGA Márta, TÚRY Ferenc

[Eating disorders are psychosomatic disorders affecting primarily women, and influence reproductive functions as well. They have an impact on ovarial cyclem fertility, course of pregnancy, process of delivery, post partum period. Moreover, some data show that they can influence the adult health status. Extensive research from the last three decades call the attention to the fact that besides the classical eating disorders (anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa) the newer types (e.g., orthorexia nervosa), and subclinical disorders also occur in a subgroup of pregnant women. For this reason it is of key importance that the personnel working in the territory of obstetrics and gynecology have a solid knowledge about the symptoms, screening and therapeutical opportunities, and outcome of these disorders. The review summarizes the recent research data about the relationship of eating disorders and pregnancy.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 20, 2016

[The value of the SCOFF questionnaire in the screening of eating disorders]

DUKAY-SZABÓ Szilvia, VARGA Márta, TÚRY Ferenc

[Having become an increasingly relevant health issue from the second half of the 20th century, eating disorders have presented the need for screening, carried out in the simplest possible way, by a short questionnaire. Morgan and his colleagues identified this necessity and in 1999 created the SCOFF test to screen eating disorders with five yes or no questions. The questionnaire promptly became popular due to its briefness and easy adaptability. It was translated into several languages, its validity was measured on numerous populations. According to the results SCOFF is suitable for primary screening of eating disorders with a non-diagnostic purpose, taken two “yes” answers out of five as the critical margin, specified by the authors. Our objective was to give a review of the history of the SCOFF questionnaire.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2013

[Orthorexia nervosa and it’s background factors]

VARGA Márta, DUKAY-SZABÓ Szilvia, TÚRY Ferenc

[The place of orthorexia nervosa (ON) - described by Bratman in 1997 - is not clearly defined in the diagnostic systems. However, the increasing number of clinical experiences and research data gives us more and more information about the epidemiology, and the social and individual characteristics of ON. The general population shows a 6.9% prevalence of ON; healthcare professionals are at high risk of ON with the prevalence rate of 35-57.6%. Education, the choice of profession, socioeconomic status and the internalization of the ideals of society are significant factors in the development of ON, while sex, age and body mass index do not seem to be determining variables in this respect. The lack of common criteria and proper research results on ON makes it impossible to generalize data on the general population. Further studies with larger representative samples and assessment instruments with good psychometric properties are necessary to make research data on ON comparable.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 20, 2012

[Some psychological and system-oriented perspectives of modern eating disorders]

VARGA Márta, BABUSA Bernadett

[The newer types of eating disorders are less common in the therapeutic practice or they may appear as a secondary disorder. Therefore only a little we know about the psychological background of these disorders. There is only a few data in the literature about the relational of family characteristics of muscle dysmorphia, eating disorder bodybuilder type, Adonis complex or orthorexia nervosa. As the classical eating disorders, like anorexia and bulimia nervosa are in a strong relationship with the newer types of eating disorders, we can assume several family factors on the basis of the underlying common features. The problems of self-esteem, the self-developmental disorder, the perfectionism, the need for control, and the relationship to the obsessionality and compulsivity are common characteristics of these disorders.]