Search results

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 28, 2020

[Neoadjuvant and palliative drug therapy for bladder cancer]

MARÁZ Anikó

[The survival of patients with muscle-invasive localized bladder cancer is more favorable if they receive neoadjuvant or adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy before or after cystectomy. Based on the meta-analyses, in case of neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, the 5-year survival benefi t is 5-16%. The outcome is even more favorable in case of patients who respond well to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (pathological complete remission rate 12–50%). More than 3 months delay of cystectomy does not signifi cantly reduce the survival if chemotherapy is performed before the operation. Results of adjuvant phase III studies and meta-analyses are not so unambiguous as neoadjuvant data, but chemotherapy seems to infl uence favorably PD-L1 expression the survival, especially in case of pT3/4 and/or N+ (and high grade or margin positivity) cases. According to the recent publications, outcome data of patients have been effective in case of progression after platinum therapy, in or after second-line and in fi rst-line therapies for cisplatin ineligible, PD-L1 positive patients, respectively. Survival and tumor response data are very promising; in particular stages, they seem to be more effective than the previously administered chemotherapies. Current and ongoing trials are investigating the combinations of new remedies with other immunotherapeutic agents or chemotherapies as well as trying to identify biomarkers in order to further increase effectiveness.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 10, 2020

[Diagnosis and treatment of the overactive bladder]

MAJOROS Attila, ROMICS Miklós

[The Overactive Bladder Syndrome (OAB) is a symptomatic diagnosis featured mainly by urgency of urine discharging. This condition can be triggered by a number of etiological factors, most of which are idiopathic in origin. Regardless of gender and age, the prevalence is ca. 16% and has a serious impact on the quality of life of the patients. In­ves­tigations are mostly performed through usual baseline examinations; second-line invasive examinations are rarely required. The broad spectrum of treatment options ran­ges from lifestyle changes and elimina­tion of triggering factors, through be­ha­vio­ural therapy and medication to the mi­ni­mally invasive (botulinum toxin, neuro­mo­dulation, percutaneous stimulation of the tibial nerve) - and rarely - invasive thera­pies. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

AUGUST 30, 2019

[The effect of whole body electrostimulation for the pelvic floor muscles ]

ARANYNÉ Molnár Tímea, NAGY Edit, DOMJÁN Andrea, FEKETE Zoltán, SURÁNYI Andrea, BÓDIS József

[The aim of the study: Few studies research the effects of trunk stabilizer muscle strengthening on pelvic floor dysfunctions. We assessed a new core strengthening method on the pelvic floor muscles. Material and method: Female patient (70 years) with stressincontinence and low back pain received the Whole Body Electric Muscle Stimulation for 10 weeks (2x25 minutes/week). The EMG (for the conditioning ability of pelvic floor muscle such as maximal isometric contraction, dynamic endurance and relaxation values), urodynamic assessment, introitus and the transabdominal ultrasound were used before and after training. Results: The patient’s the stressincontinence, low back pain and the conditioning ability of pelvic floor muscles improved. The urodynamic and ultrasounds values showed improvement in functions of the bladder neck and deep abdominal muscle. Conclusion: This method would increase the trunk stabilization and pelvic floor muscle strength of the eldery age group, which might decrease the prevalence of urinary incontinence.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2019

[The Expanded Disability Status Scale scoring in patients with multiple sclerosis]

FÜVESI Judit

[Gait disturbance is a major symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was first used in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis for the assessment of disability, however it has become more and more widely used in clinical practice as well. Nowadays its use is essential in application of the new diagnostic criteria, the new clinical form classification and in monitoring the efficacy of therapies. EDSS is based on a standardised neurological examination, but focuses on those symptoms that are frequent in multiple sclerosis. Based on the examination it assesses seven functional systems: visual, brainstem, pyramidal, cerebellar, sensory, bowel-bladder and cerebral functions. EDSS scores can be determined based on the scores given in the functional systems and on testing the walking distance. In newer versions the “Ambulation score” has been added. This chapter clarifies the scores based on the maximal walking distance and the need for a walking aid to walk this distance. The Neurostatus/EDSS training method improves the reproducibility of the standardised neurological examination that forms the basis of the EDSS scoring. Of the tests assessing walking, the Timed-25 Foot Walk Test and the self-administered 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale are suitable for routine evaluation of walking performance. An increase of more than 20% in the Timed-25 Foot Walk may be considered a significant change in gait. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2018

[Minimally invasive, extrapleural-anterolateral approach to the spine]

SZABÓ Viktor, BÜKI András, DÓCZI Tamás, SCHWARCZ Attila

[In spine surgery, minimally invasive approaches (MIS) are getting accepted and more popular worldwide during the last decades. It is due to the reduced intraoperative blood loss, decreased infection rate, less postoperative pain and earlier discharge from hospital compared to traditional approaches. The present paper puts forward a minimally invasive extrapleural approach to the thoracic spine that is not applied in Hungary. This new approach, in contrast to the standard costotransversectomy, provides direct visual control over the ventral surface of the dural sac. Furthermore, contrary to the transthoracic way, following minimally invasive extrapleural surgery thoracic drainage and intensive care are not necessary. The approach can be applied safely in treatment of ventral or ventrolateral pathologies of the thoracic spine. ]

Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 05, 2017

[Complex therapy of bladder cancer]

LANDHERR László

[Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy involving the urinary system. Urothelial (formerly called transitional cell) carcinoma is the predominant histologic type in the developed countries, where it accounts for approximately 90 percent of all bladder cancers. The optimal management of nonmuscle invasive urothelial cancer is highly important. For patients with muscle invasive cancer the gold standard treatment is the cystectomy. If the patient unable or unwilling to undergo radical cystectomy with urinary diversion, complete TURBT combined with radiation therapy plus chemotherapy may offer an alternative bladder-sparing approach. Patients with muscle invasive disease and regional lymph node metastasis limited to the pelvis (N1-N3), but without more distant lymph node or visceral metastasis may be treated with six cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by cystectomy or a combined-modality approach. In metastatic cases the combination chemotherapy may prolong survival and often provides palliation of symptomatic disease. Checkpoint inhibition immunotherapy has substantial clinical activity in post-chemotherapy patients and is the preferred therapy for patients who have progressed after platinumbased therapy or is not suitable for them.]

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 10, 2017

[Radiochemotherapy - questions/answers]

PIKÓ Béla, LACZÓ Ibolya

[During chemoradiotherapy the two main non-surgical anticancer methods are combined to improve the treatment outcomes. The theoretical possibilities of interactions and the most frequently used drugs will be presented here, emphasizing that although both the radiation therapy and the drugs need to be administered in full dose in practice considering the summarization of side effects we often have to make compromises. The treatments of the most frequent indications (brain, head and neck, oesophagus, lung, stomach, pancreas, rectum, bladder, cervix, soft tissue sarcoma) will be demonstrated. Since there are several drugs and drug combinations that are not included in the Hungarian registered anticancer therapies, for their off-label use the permission of the National Institute of Pharmacy and Nutrition is required. To choose the optimal treatment (during planning the optimal place of chemoradiotherapy, agents and doses) the opinion of a multidisciplinary team is necessary]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

APRIL 30, 2017

[Handling hazardous drugs during bladder instillation: epirubicin contamination with and without a closed system]

BOGNÁR Krisztina, ZRÍNYI Miklós, JUHÁSZ Ákos, BATKA Gábor

[The aim of the study: Assess epirubicin contamination during bladder instillation with or without the use of a closed system drug transfer device (CSTD). Material and Methods: Four hospital sites participated in an experimental wipe study (3 used, 1 did not use a CSTD [control]). Samples were frozen and transported to Germany for liquid chromatography analysis. Samples were taken from seven surfaces following drug reconstitution and patient administration. Group differences were analyzed by one way ANOVA. Results: There was a major difference in contamination between CSTD and non-CSTD use (F = 7,63; p < 0,001); the workflow without the use of a CSTD showed much greater amounts of epirubicin left behind. There wasn’t any difference in contamination across sites using a CSTD. Conclusions: Without a CSTD epirubicin contamination was high. The CSTD was shown to be effective to minimize the health risk of nurses. We recommend that CSTD be implemented in routine nursing practice.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 20, 2017

[County level mortality data of urogenital system in Hungary between 2010-2014]

KISS István, PAKSY András

[According to The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (10th Revision, ICD 10; XIV), urogenital diseases resulted in an average 910 yearly deaths in Hungary from 2010 through 2014, less than 1% of the cumulative mortality rate. Out of all urogenital conditions, kidney and bladder diseases were the leading cause of death, accounting for nearly 85 percent of all deaths in the examined period. It should be noted that mortality due to urogenital cancers, renovascular hypertonia, diabetic nephropathy, congenital malformations and pathologies related to childbirth and pregnancy are excluded from consideration in the present review. As the Hungarian Central Statistical Office does not disclose the causes of death by age and gender at its county-level data, this paper reports gender-specific mortality rates. Due to the fact that the county-level mortality rate of urogenital diseases is low and the yearly standard deviation is high, the five-year overall mortality rate of 2010-2014 is presented. Hungarian counties differ greatly in terms of mortality from urogenital diseases. The number of deaths per 100 000 population ranges between 6.74 in Békés county and 16.38 in Fejér county. Counties within the same region may exhibit substantially different mortality rates. An overall 7.01 deaths per 100 000 population was reported in Győr-Moson-Sopron county, whereas among residents of the neighbouring Vas county the rate was reported as 14.73 per 100 000 population. The observed variations prevail even when standardised mortality rates are compared and thus the differences in the counties’ age distributions are accounted for. Regional differences become more apparent when only the deaths caused by kidney diseases are analysed out of all urogenital pathologies. In this case, two- or threefold differences are observed between the respective Hungarian counties. Major disparities are still present between counties within the same region. For example, the number of deaths per 100.000 population is 3.74 in Hajdú-Bihar county, and 8.04 in Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok county, respectively. The diagnosis frequency of kidney diseases has a strong positive correlation with case fatality, but it may not fully account for all regional variations in mortality rates. Regional characteristics of dialytic care and the accessibility of dialytic facilities is not related to patient mortality. ]

Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 10, 2015

[Non surgical treatment of urinary bladder cancer]

PIKÓ Béla, LACZÓ Ibolya

[According to our present knowledge the surgical intervention in the treatment of bladder cancer is essential, but some non-surgical treatment methods play an indispensable role as well. Super- fi cial (non-muscle-invasive) form of bladder cancer can be treated by intravesical chemotherapy or BCG instillation, radiotherapy; the muscle-invasive forms of this tumour (≥pT2a) need neoadjuvant, adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy. In case of metastatic disease (or locally advanced, recurrent disease) the treatment regimen consist of chemotherapy (given as fi rst line or second line), palliative radiotherapy, interventional methods, radio-isotope therapy and symptoms relief drugs. We present each of the therapeutic modalities and their indications category based on the ESMO and NCCN guidelines.]