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Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

OCTOBER 30, 2019

[Biomonitoring of lead exposure among workers: the role of the occupational health nurse ]

SZOBOTA Lívia

[Biological monitoring (biomonitoring) in occupational safety and health is the detection of substances (biomarkers) in biological samples of workers, compared to reference values. This article is limited to Lead (Pb) exposures, as it is one of the most important models for biomonitoring of exposure, with the blood Pb concentration as a predominant choice in occupational health. This article examines the nature of and risk factors for lead exposure among workers, the scope of the problem, the legislative and regulatory framework relevant to biomonitoring, and the role of occupational health nurses in promoting a culture of safety to prevent exposures. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

[Financing of medicines for treatment of rare diseases of the nervous system. orphan drugs in rare neurological diseases]

SZEGEDI Márta, KOSZTOLÁNYI György, BONCZ Imre, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Objectives – Nervous system involvement is expected up to 60-70% in case of rare diseases. This article aims to present the financial methods and expenditures of rare neurological diseases’ orphan medicinal products being financed in the frame of Hungarian social insurance system in 2012. Methods – The subsidized orphan medicines were selected on the Orphanet portal 2012 while orphans financed by compessionate use were provided by the Hungarian National Insurance Fund Administration (OEP) database. Three products exist without orphan designation, however those are intended for the treatment of rare neurological ailments. The medicines were categorized by financial methods and determined by costs. Results – Numerically, out of 36 pieces of subsidized orphan or orphan criteria fulfilled medicines 17 were authorized for the treatments of rare neurological diseases in the year of 2012. Most of the drugs (14 pieces) were to be financed in the frame of compassionate use by the reimbursement system. The cost amount of social insurance for 387 rare neurological disease patients reached more than 4.5 billion HUF (1.4% of the total pharmaceutical budget in outpatient care). Conclusions – In Hungary half of the subsidized orphans are intended for the treatments of rare neurological ailments. 30% of the total amount of social insurance for rare diseases’ medicinal treatments were used to subsidizing rare neurological disease patients in 2012. Most of the orphan medicines were to be financed in the frame of compassionate use by the reimbursement system for outpatient care. Consequently, a great deal of crucial problems occurred in relation with the unconventional subsidizing method. At the end of 2012 new financial methods have been elaborated and introduced in a pilot phase from 1 January 2013. In spite of the high cost commitment, nearly the entire diagnosed rare disease subpopulation have been provided with subsidized treatments in Hungary. In order to facilitate the acces to orphan medicines, collaboration shall be achieved by financing authority and professionals for identificating the descently sustainable, affordable and viable financial method. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 20, 2019

[Biological rhythms and ageing ]

PUREBL György

[Biological rhythms plays key role in maintaining health and preventing diseases. The changes of rhythms are normally associated to aging. Biological rhythms become more fragile along with the age and therefore they are connected to various age-related health problems. The interest about the strategies aiming to maintain or restore biological rhythms is increasing. There are evidences about the beneficial effect of rhythm restoration therapies in dementia and depression, but future studies are needed to clarify the general health promoting and also geroprotecting effect of these interventions. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2021

[Consensus statement of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenic Society about the therapy of adult SMA patients]

BOCZÁN Judit, KLIVÉNYI Péter, KÁLMÁN Bernadette, SZÉLL Márta, KARCAGI Veronika, ZÁDORI Dénes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Background – Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive, progressive neuromuscular disorder resulting in a loss of lower motoneurons. Recently, new disease-modifying treatments (two drugs for splicing modification of SMN2 and one for SMN1 gene replacement) have become available. Purpose – The new drugs change the progression of SMA with neonatal and childhood onset. Increasing amount of data are available about the effects of these drugs in adult patients with SMA. In this article, we summarize the available data of new SMA therapies in adult patients. Methods – Members of the Executive Committee of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenetic Society surveyed the literature for palliative treatments, randomized controlled trials, and retrospective and prospective studies using disease modifying therapies in adult patients with SMA. Patients – We evaluated the outcomes of studies focused on treatments of adult patients mainly with SMA II and III. In this paper, we present our consensus statement in nine points covering palliative care, technical, medical and safety considerations, patient selection, and long-term monitoring of adult patients with SMA. This consensus statement aims to support the most efficient management of adult patients with SMA, and provides information about treatment efficacy and safety to be considered during personalized therapy. It also highlights open questions needed to be answered in future. Using this recommendation in clinical practice can result in optimization of therapy.]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 30, 2020

[Biological clock and cancer]

VELLAINÉ Takács Krisztina, SZTANKOVICS Dániel, HOFFMANN Gyula, KOPPER László, GÁLOSI Rita

[In the present paper, we are giving a review about the circadian rhythm of the biological rhythm, its regulation and relation to tumorigenesis. The circadian rhythm is an approximately 24-hour cycle in biochemical, physiological processes in organisms from unicellular to vertebrates. This biological rhythm is generated by the synchronization of our endogenous clocks and the light as the main “Zeitgeber”. The nucleus suprachiasmaticus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the region, which is considered to be the circadian “main clock” of the organism and is responsible for coordinating peripheral clocks in different organ systems. At the cellular level, the regulation of the circadian rhythm is basically provided by the so-called “circadian locomotor output cycles kaput” the CLOCK genes. The discovery of those cellular mechanisms was awarded with Nobel Prize in 2017. The CLOCK genes, acting on other effector genes, regulate diurnal rhythm of protein synthesis. More and more data are available, which suggest that there is an association between circadian genes and tumor development. Furthermore, many studies show a link between the shift work and the development of breast and prostate cancer and between mutations in some circadian genes and development of carcinomas. More data suggest a relationship between tumor metabolism and CLOCK genes and their regulations. Based on all these data, the circadian rhythm, so the time of day, may need to be taken into account during cancer therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2020

[Family planning in multiple sclerosis: conception, pregnancy, breastfeeding]

RÓZSA Csilla

[Family planning is an exceptionally important question in multiple sclerosis, as women of childbearing age are the ones most often affected. Although it is proven that pregnancy does not worsen the long-term prognosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, many patients are still doubtful about having children. This question is further complicated by the fact that patients – and often even doctors – are not sufficiently informed about how the ever-increasing number of available disease-modifying treatments affect pregnancies. Breastfeeding is an even less clear topic. Patients usually look to their neurologists first for answers concerning these matters. It falls to the neurologist to rationally evaluate the risks and benefits of contraception, pregnancy, assisted reproduction, childbirth, breastfeeding and disease modifying treatments, to inform patients about these, and then together come to a decision about the best possible therapeutic approach, taking the patients’ individual family plans into consideration. Here we present a review of relevant literature adhering to international guidelines on the topics of conception, pregnancy and breastfeeding, with a special focus on the applicability of approved disease modifying treatments during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The goal of this article is to provide clinicians involved in the care of MS patients with up-to-date information that they can utilize in their day-to-day clinical practice. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JUNE 20, 2018

[Diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases]

MÜLLER Veronika

[Recognition and diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILD) is one of the most challenging tasks of respiratory medicine. In the wide range of different ILD-s idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is one of the most common. Improvements in the diagnosis made the recognition of IPF easier. Typical clinical features and usual interstitial pneumonia pattern on high resolution CT are now enough for the confident diagnosis of IPF in the multidisciplinary ILD-team discussions. Bronchoscopic cryobiopsy is a great achievement of histological sampling as this can give appropriate size tissue for histological analysis making surgical intervention rare. As IPF cannot be cured early diagnosis is crucial. Today available treatments can only slow down progression of the disease, so early stages and better clinical condition of the patients are essential for therapeutic success. Follow-up of IPF patients includes complex lung functional measurements in dedicated centers in Hungary. Former studies confirmed forced vital capacity (FVC) decline as an important measure of disease progression and mortality. Available IPF treatments decrease FVC decline and can prevent the mostly deadly acute exacerbations of the disease. Additionally palliative treatments including supplementary oxygen and in selected patients lung transplantation can be offered. This is the first of a series of three articles about IPF. ]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 30, 2020

[Development and 10-year history of a biosimilar: the example of Binocrit®]

AAPRO Matti, KRENDYUKOV Andriy, HÖBEL Nadja, SEIDL Andreas, GASCÓN Pere

[Patent expirations for several biological products have prompted the development of alternative versions, termed ‘biosimilars’, which have comparable quality, safety and effi cacy to a licensed biological medicine (also referred to as the ‘reference’ medicine). The fi rst biosimilars developed in oncology were the supportive-care agents fi lgrastim and epoetin. Binocrit® (HX575) is a biosimilar version of epoetin alfa, indicated in the oncology setting for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA). The process for development and approval of Binocrit® as a biosimilar included extensive analytical characterization and comparison with the reference epoetin alfa. This was followed by a clinical development program comprising phase I pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies to show bioequivalence to the reference medicine and a confi rmatory phase III study to confi rm therapeutic effectiveness in CIA. Since its approval, Binocrit® has been extensively used and studied in real-world clinical practice. The accumulated data confi rm that Binocrit® is an effective and well-tolerated option for the treatment of CIA in patients with cancer.]

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 28, 2020

[Treatment sequencing in metastatic colorectal cancer]

MODEST D. P., PANT S., SARTORE-BIANCHI A.

[Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) remains incurable in most cases, but survival has improved with advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted agents. However, the optimal use and sequencing of these agents across multiple lines of treatment is unclear. Here, we review current treatment approaches and optimal treatment sequencing across the fi rst-, second- and third-line settings in mCRC, including biological aspects affecting sequencing and rechallenge. Effective fi rst-line therapy is a key determinant of treatment outcomes and should be selected after considering both clinical factors and biological markers, notably RAS and BRAF. The second-line regimen choice depends on the systemic therapies given in fi rst-line. Anti-angiogenic agents (e.g. bevacizumab, ramucirumab and afl ibercept) are indicated for most patients, whereas epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors do not improve survival in the second-line setting. Molecular profi ling is important in thirdline treatment, with options in RAS wild-type patients including EGFR inhibitors (cetuximab or panitumumab), regorafenib and trifl uridine/tipiracil. Immunotherapy with pembrolizumab or nivolumab ± ipilimumab may be considered for patients with high microsatellite instability disease. Targeting HER2/neu amplifi cation shows promise for the subset of CRC tumours displaying this abnormality. Sequencing decisions are complicated by the potential for any treatment break or de-escalation to evoke a distinct clinical progression type. Ongoing trials are investigating the optimal sequencing and timing of therapies for mCRC. Molecular profi ling has established new targets, and increasing knowledge of tumour evolution under drug pressure will possibly impact on sequencing.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[The pain-trigger role of cytokines in the nervous system – the direct analgesic effect of anti-cytokine therapy ]

HODINKA László, VERECKEI Edit

[Nociceptive, neuropathic and central me­chanisms are involved in the perception, transmission and processing of chronic pain and shaping of cerebral pain image. Alar­mins – molecules alarming defence and signing the presence of pathogens and tissue damage - trigger a series of pathogenic events resulting in inflammatory pain stimuli. Proinflammatory cytokines play a determining role in the pain perception at the level of the nervous system. Continuous inflammatory stimuli while sensitizing the periferic and central neurons activate the pain-related cerebral areas and develop the complex pain image, the pain matrix. Ce­reb­ral functional connections are operating in networks and can be visualized by functional MRI. Cytokines activate the neurons directly or indirectly by other neuromediators. Cytokine receptors are expressed on no­ciceptors and even on higher-level neurons and on various non-neural cells, such as microglia and astrocytes. The most ubiquitous cytokines are the Tumour Necrosis Factor and Interleukin 6 in the nervous sys­tem. The signaling pathways are the Nuclear Factor κB and the Janus-kinase enzyme system. The proinflammatory cytokines and the Janus-kinase are therefore primary therapeutic targets. Anti-cytokine biologicals and small molecular kinase inhibitors decrease the pain and improve functional activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Decrease of pain was more pronounced than expected only from the decrease of the clinical biomarkers of inflammation. The early and ra­pid painkiller effect of targeted biological and chemical-biological response modifiers is attributed to their direct analgesic effect on the brain.]