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Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[Post-career development of cardiometabolic changes and hypertension in competitive athletes]

LELBACH Ádám, KÁNTOR Márk, KOLLER Ákos

[Regular physical activity is essential in delaying the aging processes (e.g. arterial remodelling – stiffening, metabolism, bodyweight), the beneficial effects of competitive sports – especially strength sports – according to the recent data of the literature are questionable. The beneficial effects of physical activity on the cardiovascular (CV) system are well known, however less is known regarding the delayed impacts of high intensity competitive sports on the CV system, especially after the sport career is over. This review summarizes the effects of active competitive sport and the post-career period on the cardiometabolic system with special attention to the systemic blood pressure and the development of metabolic syndrome. After sport career, the welldeveloped high performance cardiovascular- and metabolic system suddenly is much less used, but still supported by sport-level diet. It is well known that hypertension is a significant pathogenic factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases, characterized – among others – by reduced elasticity of large- and medium- sized vessels thereby importantly contributing to the development of systolic hypertension. Inflammation and thrombus formation both play an important role in the development of vascular injury and atherosclerosis. The increased tone of microvessels can impair the blood supply of certain organs, including the coronary circulation. It has been ample shown, that regular non-competitive, aerobic exercise activities are important factors in preventing hypertension. Such pathological changes become more evident after the development of post-career obesity, as well as the development of hypertension due to the activation of the renin-angiotensin system through sodium retention and other metabolic changes (increased glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus). It has been ample shown, that regular non-competitive, dynamic aerobic exercise activities are important factors in preventing hypertension. The frequency, intensity, type, and time (FITT) principle of exercise prescription is the first and common therapeutic approach, which represents the translation of cardiovascular basic science research results into hypertension treatment, thus can provide a personalized physical activity program/therapy according to medical needs not just for the post-career sportspersons, but the wide range of patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 24, 2020

[Arterial hypertension and atrial fibrillation - the most important risk factors for stroke in clinical practice ]

LUDOVIT Gaspar, VESTENICKA Veronika, CAPRNDA Martin

[Vascular stroke is a very frequent cause of morbidity and mortality, and in patients who suffered stroke subsequent long-term neurological deficit of greater or lesser extent is an important factor. Numerous clinical and epidemiological studies confirmed that elevated systemic blood pressure is among the main risk factors of both ischemic and hemorrhagic vascular stroke, the effects of arterial hypertension being very complex including morphological and functional changes in vessels and vascular circulation. In our retrospective analysis of 218 patients hospitalized for stroke we found arterial hypertension in 91.2% of subjects and atrial fibrillation in 32.1% of subjects. 182 patients (83.5%) have been diagnosed with ischemic stroke and 36 patients (16.5%) with hemorrhagic stroke. In the group of patients with atrial fibrillation, only 33 patients (47.1%) were treated by anticoagulants, what points out an inadequate indication of anticoagulant treatment when considering the stroke risk calculation for atrial fibrillation (CHA2DS2- VASc Score) and bleeding risk (HAS-BLED Calculator for Atrial Fibrillation). It is also noteworthy that in the group of patients with anticoagulant therapy who have developed ischemic stroke in spite of this treatment, we found that in 48.5% the treatment was underdosed and therefore ineffective. Our work points to the need to improve the effective management of arterial hypertension and atrial fibrillation, the most common modifiable factors of vascular strokes.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 24, 2020

[Cardiovascular risk assessment in chronic kidney disease, significance of left ventricular myocardial mass index]

SÁGI Balázs, KÉSŐI István, VAS Tibor, CSIKY Botond, NAGY Judit, KOVÁCS Tibor

[Introduction: Earlier studies have shown that cardiovascular (CV) mortality and morbidity in chronic kidney disease (CKD) often exceed their average population, and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for CV disease. However, in CKD, the relationship between LVH, arterial stiffness (AS) and renal function has not yet been fully elucidated. Little data is available on their prognostic role. Aims of our study a) cross-sectional examination of the relationship between left ventricular mass index (LVMI), arterial vascular stiffness, and renal function, b) in our follow-up study, clarification of the LVMI, the prognostic role of AS in patients with CKD, IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Methods: In our cross-sectional study, 79 IgAN patients were examined in our clinic. The myocardial mass index (LVMI) was determined using an estimation formula after echocardiographic measurements. Arterial stiffness was measured using a photoplethizmography technique (PulseTrace) and characterized by the stiffness index (SI). The MDRD formula was used to estimate renal function (GFR) (eGFR, ml/min/1.73 m2). In the prognostic study the primary combined endpoint was total mortality, the most important CV events (stroke, myocardial infarction or cardiovascular interventions such as revascularization) and end stage renal disease. Secondary endpoints were CV and renal endpoints separately. Results: Of the 79 patients included in our cross-sectional study, 50 were men, with an average age of 46 ± 11 years. The mean value of LVMI was 106.66 ± 22.98 g/m2. Patients were divided into groups of 115 g/m2 for males considered to be abnormal and 95 g/m2 for women. LVMI is closely correlated with SI and inversely with eGFR (corr. coeff: 0.358; p <0.05 or -0.526; p <0.001). In case of LVH, SI was significantly higher in both sexes (p = 0.005 in males, p = 0.04 in females). In case of higher LVMI, renal function was significantly lower (p = 0.002 in males, p = 0.01 in females). Metabolic syndrome occurred in several cases in both sexes with LVH, but the difference was only significant in male patients (males 6 vs. 10, p = 0.008; females 2 vs. 4, p = 0.29). In our follow-up study, the presence of LVH in men significantly reduced survival in both primary and secondary endpoints, whereas in women there was no significant difference. Conclusion: In IgAN decreasing of renal function is closely related to left ventricular hypertrophy and vascular stiffness, as well as a close relationship was found between LVMI and AS. Reduced renal function is associated with an increase in LVMI and an increase in AS, which may result in a worse prognosis for both CV and renal outcomes. The underlying role of all these can be assumed to be a common vascular and myocardial pathological remodeling.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 10, 2020

[Summary data of Hungary's comprehensive health screening program (MAESZ) 2010-2019]

BARNA István, KÉKES Ede, HALMY Eszter, BALOGH Zoltán, KUBÁNYI Jolán, SZŐTS Gábor, NÉMETH János, PÉCSVÁRADY Zsolt, MAJOROS Attila, DAIKI Tenno, ERDEI Ottilia, DANKOVICS Gergely

[The comprehensive screening program of Hun­gary (MAESZ) 2010-2020-2030 is a unique initiative in Hungary and worldwide too. This largest humanitarian program provides by the latest technology free scree­ning tests for all residents in Hungary. The program developed by 76 pro­fessional organizations offers 38 scree­ning tests to every participants free of charge, in a special designed screening truck. Screening program performed by MAESZ includes cardiovascular, ophthalmologic, dermatologic, gynecologic, and neurologic investigations, lab tests, audiometry, blood pressure and arterial stiffness measurements, and venous Doppler ultrasound examinations. More­over, screening tests for lactose intolerance, colon malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease, reflux disease, urine incontinency, prostatic cancer and physical activity level were evaluated. Starting 2020, a dental screening station will be added to the mobile unit for early detection of oral cancers. Beyond screening tests, special attention is paid to assess health threatening risk factors, such as smoking, alcohol con­sumption, physical inactivity, un­healthy nutrition, and obesity. The program demonstrates the key elements of first aid from reanimation to bandage of burns in cooperation with professional and civil organisations. Furthermore, during the waiting time, participants get lifestyle recommendations and a health booklet with a bar code enabling the immediate computer analysis of test outcomes. Since the 2018/2019 school year the official prevention program for children entitled “Travel around the Empire of Health” was started. During its 10 years, the MAESZ performed 7 million free of charge screening tests on 1,886 scenes, enrolled 560,000 participants, invested 16,000 hours for prevention, handed out 1,200,000 health booklets and 391,000 prevention info packages to thousands of fami­lies. More than 20,000 health professionals (GPs, nurses, dietetics, health development agents, public health government officials, Accident Prevention Committee of National Police Headquarters, General Directorate of Social Affairs and Child Protection and non-governmental organizations) have been participated. The program designed to improve social health aims to help more and more Hun­garian citizens to be informed about their health status and to reminds them of the importance of prevention. ]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 10, 2019

[The role of stromal components in the behavior of malignant tumors]

KOVALSZKY Ilona, BAGHY Kornélia

[Stroma was considered for a long time as an innocent bystander without infl uence on the behavior of the cancer tissue. However, this opinion considerably changed in the last twenty years. Increasing evidences have been gathered proving that all components of the stroma is active participant in the development and progression of cancer. Although stroma can exert protective role against the early development of tumors, this changes soon as cancer cells are forcing the stromal components to support their growth. This can be accomplished by the induction of stromal stiffness, production of fuels, citokines, growth factors, new blood vessels for the progression of cancer cells. This recognition lead to the introduction of a new approach, targeting stroma in anticancer therapy. Among those attempt excellent results have been achieved by the immune and antiangiogenesis therapy, but countless other attempts are going on.]

Hypertension and nephrology

DECEMBER 12, 2019

[Hypertension and brain function. Correlation of high blood pressure and demencia in aging. Hypertension in young-middle adults - demencia in elderly]

SZÉKÁCS Béla, KÉKES Ede

[The cerebral vascular damage caused by hypertension is manifested primarily in cognitive dysfunction, which is caused by hypoperfusion of brain tissue, ischemic, or bleeding stroke, or white matte injury. Hypertension may not only result in cerebral damage to the vascular background - dementia -, but may also contribute to the development and progression of classical gene-related Alzheimer’s disease. Blood pressure gradually increases in the elderly and in the very elderly, and the frequency of hypertension-mostly as isolated systolic hypertension - is 50% to 70%. High blood pressure predominately, or in full, means not only an increase in the circulatory resistance of the small children, but also, as part of the aging of the body, the rigidity (stiffness) of the arteries. At the same time, the incidence of dementia, along with age, rises sharply - up to 20% in those over 65 years of age, and over 40% in 80-90 years of age. The relationship between high blood pressure and dementia from the young age to the very old age may change as a function of current age. In the very old age of life, the varying influence of other pathological factors other than hypertension is becoming more and more important in the deterioration of both the vascular structure and the brain function. In this late stage of life, the very advanced rate of aging and nutritive blood flow often require higher perfusion pressure, and the not enough thought-out blood pressure reduction can be more damaging than a protective effect on brain condition or function. SPRINT MIND - the Intense Blood Pressure Reduction - hasn’t resolved the question, and we can legally assume that the 130-140 Hgmm SBP. Is the most favorable for dementia. The value of DBP 70 Hgmm is definitely unfavorable.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 15, 2019

[The association between advanced age and peripheral arterial disease]

KOLOSSVÁRY Endre, FARKAS Katalin

[The high-income countries are characterized by the aging of the residents (epidemiological transition) and the change of the disease patterns that are recognized in the population (epidemiological transition). In that sense, considering the cardiovascular diseases in the last few decades, a decline of mortality of acute, fatal conditions (stroke, myocardial infarction) is notable. All these factors contributed to the recognition of the importance of peripheral arterial disease and related problems in the aging popula­tion of the affected people. The high prevalence, the decline of quality of life associated with compromised lower limb circula­tion, the risk of the limb loss, the challenge of rehabilitation and the high mortality represent a significant and increasing burden to the healthcare. The review aims to analyse the relation of the aging population and peripheral arterial disease, addressing the aspects of epidemiology, diagnostics, and therapy. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

OCTOBER 23, 2019

[The importance of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in psychopathology and cardiovascular conditions: psychosomatic connections]

LÁSZLÓ Andrea, LÉNÁRT Lilla, ILLÉSY Lilla, FEKETE Andrea, NEMCSIK János

[Cardiovascular diseases and mood disorders are common public health problems worldwide. Their connections are widely studied, and the role of neurotrophins, especially brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is already supposed in both conditions. However, no reviews are available describing possible associations between cardiovascular risk and mood disorders based on BDNF. Decreased level of BDNF is observed in depression and its connection to hypertension has also been demonstrated with affecting the arterial baroreceptors, reninangiotensin system and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. BDNF was also found to be the predictor of cardiovascular outcome in different patient populations. Our aim was to overview the present knowledge in this area demonstrating a new aspect of the associations between mood disorders and cardiovascular diseases through the mediation of BDNF. These findings might enlighten a new psychosomatic connection and suggest a new therapeutic target that is beneficial both in respect of mood disorders and cardiovascular pathology.]

Hypertension and nephrology

OCTOBER 23, 2019

[Non-invasive evaluation of cardiovascular risk in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients]

BÁRCZI Adrienn, DÉGI Arianna Amália, KIS Éva, REUSZ György

[Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar to adults, children with CKD experience a high burden of traditional and uremia-associated risk factors. Recent years, several studies were published in connection with cardiovascular risk factors, patomechanism, and early markers of cardiovascular diseases. Early signs of cardiomyopathy, such as left ventricular hypertrophy or dysfunction, and markers of atherosclerosis, such as increased intima-media thickness of the carotid artery or increased wall stiffness of the aorta are frequently present in early stages of CKD in children. As prevention is important in pediatrics, the evaluation of subtle changes of the cardiovascular system provide opportunity for early treatment and that enables children to develop normally and have a better long-term quality of life. Recently, newer non-invasive cardiovascular imaging modalities have been emerged to diagnose subclinical alterations of the heart and vessels in this specific population with kidney disease. In this review, we provide an overwiev of the emerging imaging techniques used to detect early subclinical organ damage in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.]