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Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2018

Psychoform and somatoform dissociative experiences in migraine: relationship with pain perception and migraine related disability

SENGUL Yildizhan, SENGUL Serdar Hakan, TUNC Abdulkadir

Objective - Migraine is a common and often debilitating disorder. Although the existence of a link between migraine and certain psychological features has long been known, data on dissociative experiences in migraine patients is insufficient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of psychoform and somatoform dissociative experiences among migraine patients without aura and to examine their relationship with pain perception and disability. Methods - A total of 110 outpatients diagnosed with migraine based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders-III (ICHD-III) criteria and 70 healthy subjects were enrolled to this study. Sociodemographic data, Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ), Dissociative Experience Scale (DES), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Scale (BAS) scores were recorded for each patient. The Migraine Impairment Disability Assessment Scale (MIDAS) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores were also determined. Results - The mean SDQ and DES scores were significantly higher in migraine patients (p<0.001, p<0.01). According to SDQ, somatoform dissociation disorder, dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, and dissociative identity disorder were considered in 29.4%, 18.3%, and 10.1% of the migraine patients, respectively. Also, 20.9% of the patients had possible psychoform dissociation according to DES. A significant positive correlation was found between DES, SDQ scores, and VAS, MIDAS scores. Patients were found to have statistically significantly higher levels of depression and anxiety symptoms compared to healthy controls (p < 0.001). Higher DES and SDQ scores were associated with increased disability and pain level (p<0.01). Conclusion - Our findings seem to confirm the increased occurrence of somatoform and psychoform dissociative experiences in migraine patients. This study was intended as a beginning towards understanding dissociative experiences in migraine.

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2018

Evaluation of symptom severity, functional status and anxiety levels in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome with different electrophysiological stages

SEVINC Gürses Eftal, TEKESIN Aysel, TUNC Abdulkadir

Objective - The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between electrophysiological stage, symptom severity, functional status and anxiety levels in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Materials and methods - This study included 130 patients in the 25-79 age group who were classified as clinically and electrophysiologically idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome in our electromyography (EMG) laboratory. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess pain during rest and activity. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Scale (BCTS) was used to evaluate symptom severity and functional status. Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Capacity Scale (FCS) were assessed separately as a part of BCTS. Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) was used for anxiety assessment. Results - A total of 130 patients (25 males and 105 females) were enrolled to this prospective study. The mean age of the patients was 46.95 ± 10.57 years. When the electrophysiological stage was increased, it was found that SSS score and FCS score were increased (p <0.001). No significant correlation was detected between electrophysiological stage and VAS or BAI score. There was a positive correlation between VAS scores and SSS, FCS and BAI scores (p <0.001). Symptom severity and functional status were correlated with anxiety scores (p <0.001). SSS and FCS values of stage III and above patients were significantly higher than Stage I and II CTS patients (p <0.01). Conclusion - In conclusion, our study showed a significant correlation between symptom severity, functional status and anxiety in CTS patients. This can be interpreted as the mental deterioration of individuals with more severe symptoms. On the other hand, additional psychiatric support options should be recommended in cases of moderate findings but anxious symptoms. Electrophysiological findings shouldn’t be sufficient to measure the effect of the disease on the person.

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2018

Caregiver burden and quality of life in early stages of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease

YUKSEL Burcu, AK Dogan Pelin, SEN Aysu, SARIAHMETOGLU Hande, USLU Celiker Sibel, ATAKLI Dilek

Objectives - The aim of this study was to assess the impact of early stage of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD) on caregiver burden with disease severity, duration, disability and psychiatric symptoms. Methods - 30 IPD patient (15 female, 15 male) - caregiver (18 female, 12 male) pairs participated in the study. Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) scale was used to provide the assessment of disease progression and Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was used for assessing disability and impairment. Zarit Caregiver Burden Inventory (ZCBI) was used to ascertain the distress experienced by caregivers. Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) was performed on both patient and caregiver groups to evaluate anxiety and depression. Depressive symptoms of both groups were also measured by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Patients’ psychotic symptoms were assessed using the part 1- mentation, behavior and mood section of UPDRS. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to evaluate dementia symptoms and Short Form-36 (SF-36) was also used to assess quality of life. Results - We found significant correlation between caregiver burden with disease severity and duration. There was a significant difference between high UPDRS scores and the caregiver’s will for placing her/his patient in a long-term institution. Patients who had depression risk according to BDI had also high UPDRS scores. Patients with off period had higher UPDRS scores and lower SF-36 subdomains of general health, physical functioning, emotional role and social functioning. Conclusion - IPD is a chronic, progressive neuro- degenerative disease and comprises substantial burden on patients, families of patients and caregivers. The disease duration and disability have a remarkable impact on caregiver burden. For the good quality of caregiving, protective therapies should be recommended for caregivers if needed.

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

APRIL 30, 2018

[Quality of Life of Cancer Patients’]

PATÓ Edit

[Aim of the study: This research is the part of an extended examination. It’s aim is to assess the cancer patients’ quality of life, how the diseas effects in the way of life, and also the psychologycal burden of the patients. Furthermore to assess the patient’s knowledge of their desease. Material and Methods: The research is descriptive, empirical, supplemenary, which in nurses and patients in oncology departments of Hondvéd Hospital in Budapest and Bács-Kiskun County Hospital in Kecskemét were attend. The method of the survey was an individual questionnaire. The evaulation of the results made with MS Excel and SPSS. The complete evaluable questionnaire’s rate is 74,9% (N=131). Results: the patients judge their own health and quality of life to low in a rate of 56,6%, and 75% of them stated that their way of life and their daily routin has changed in a significant extent. 50% of the responders described their actual emotional condition with a negative indicative, and also occur different psychic disfunctions amuong them. For example the depression in a rate of 17,5%, anxiety is in 18,5%, and reduced self-evaluation in 14,1%. A significant majority (76,3%) of respondents don’t possess the appropriate knowledge. Conclusions: The disease effect on cancer patients’ way of life and quality of life in a significant way. Patients are exposed to a significant psycholigycal burden. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

AUGUST 30, 2018

[Depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior. Recognition and care]

RIHMER Zoltán, BLAZSEK Péter, HARGITTAY Csenge, KALABAY László, TORZSA Péter

[Depression and anxiety disorders are major problems both in psychiatric and in general practice because of their frequency and recurring character. Owing to their common complications (suicide, suicide attempts, secondary alcoholism / drug disease, increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality, loss of work, social isolation, etc.) they are the cause of significant individual, family and social burdens. In our paper we review the clinically revealable suicide risk and protective factors that can be observed in depression and anxiety disorders as well as the main aspects of the recognition and care of suicidal patients. With available medicines and non-pharmacological therapies, the vast majority of depressive and anxiety patients can be successfully treated and in most cases we can prevent suicidal behavior associated with these diseases. Besides psychiatrists general practitioners as well play a significant role in preventing suicidal behavior and in the recognition of suicide risk. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JUNE 20, 2018

[Why is it important and ethical to treat anxiety patients?]

RADICS Judit

[The identification of anxious patiens is not always an easy task. The diagnose is clear in that case, when the symptoms (psychic or somatic) are evident or/and patients complain about anxiety. Anxiety itself is not a pathological symptom if it is adequate in strength and duration. Anxiety reactions have large individual variety -, they are pathological if inadequate and irrelevante and don’t match with the actual situation. According to epidemilogical data one third of patients of family doctors suffer from anxiety but somatic symptoms come to the front, so the patients participate in a great number of medical examinations. It is important to emphasise that medical examinations are necessary to preclude the possibility of any somatic disease. The di­ag­nostic criteria of DSM-5. are an excellent assistance for a good diagnosis. Anxiety is a risk factor for cardiological diseases and diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of anxiety disorders are 12.6-17.2%. Anxiety di­sorders are well-manageable, they need complex therapy: benzodiazepines, antidepressants, hypnotics and psychotherapy. They frequently co-exist with depression and insomnia so they have to be treated together. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2018

[Assessment of health related quality of life among epileptic patients in the context of coping strategies and subjective disease perception]

KOVÁTS Daniella, CSÁSZÁR-NAGY Noémi, JUHOS Vera, SALLAY Viola, BÉKÉS Judit, FABÓ Dániel, KELEMEN Anna, KURIMAY Tamás

[Purpose – Psychosocial condition and life quality of epileptic patients are greatly determined by the existence of the disease-related comorbid disorders, like depression, anxiety, and the subjective disease perception, as well as the neuropsychological consequences of the seizures. (Whitehead et al. 2015; Goldstein et al. 2005). It has been examined in patients living with epilepsy how subjective disease perception and coping strategies influence life quality, comorbid depression and the condition of anxiety. Methods – Study patients were asked to fill in a self-completion questionnaire, which examined their psychosocial condition (HADS, Beck Depression Scale), life quality (Qolie-31), coping strategies (FKV-LIS), and subjective disease perception (IPQ-R), as well as sociodemographic and disease variables. The subjects of the study: the data of epileptic patients between the age of 18 to 70 was recorded. Patients were selected from the adult outpatients of a national centre, a regional hospital and two private health care centres located in Budapest. Results – Based on the multiple regression analysis. Beck’s depression (b coefficient=-0.351, t=-4.703, p<0.001**). Depressive coping strategy (FKV Dep) (b coefficient = -0.235, t=-3.123, p=0.002**). Subjective health perception (b coefficient =0.232. t=3.643, p<0.001**). Sex (women; b coefficient =-0.162, t=-3.008, p=0.003**). IPQ consequences (b coefficient =-0.161, t=-2.572, p=0.012*). Active coping strategy (FKV Act; b coefficient =0.146, t=2.572, p=0.012*). Type of seizure (b coefficient =-0.138, t=-2.527, p=0.013*), and Sleep quality (b coefficient =-0.125, t=-1.995, p=0.049) explain some 75.6% of the variance of life quality’s total score (model3: F=33.333, p<0.001**. adjusted R2=0.733). Conclusions – Among the factors of the subjective disease perception (IPQ-R), the physical, mental and social consequences play the most important role. Similarly, the impact of negative emotional representation, as well as the erratic nature of the seizures are decisive. Emotional representation, cyclicity and disease coherence have an important role in coping with disease-related negative emotions. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2018

What is the real effect of pregabalin in patients with diabetic neuropathic pain? (Do patients suffer from less pain or do they less care about it?)

CAGDAS Erdogan, NEDIM Ongun, SELIM Tümkaya, HAKAN Alkan, NEŞE Öztürk

Objectives - Depression and anxiety are frequent in patients with chronic diseases such as diabetic neuropathic pain. The pain seems to be more severe in patients in whom depressive findings accompanied pain symptoms. Pregabalin was reported to have positive effects on anxiety and depression. This brings out the question, whether the pain relief effect of pregabalin is due to its analgesic effect or to its effects on mood? The aim of this study is to find out whether the positive effect of pregabalin in patients with diabetic neuropathic pain is limited to its effect on pain. Thus the question - do patients suffer from less pain or do they less care about pain? - should be answered. Methods - With this aim the NRS scores of 46 patients with diabetic neuropathic pain, whose HADS scores did not change with pregabalin treatment were compared with their baseline levels, retrospectively. Results - The NRS scores of the group were reduced with pregabalin treatment. Conclusion - This results suggests that the reduced pain in pregabalin treatment should be independent from its effects on depression and anxiety.

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 02, 2018

[Therapy and examination of generalized anxiety disorder in general practitioner practice]

BECZE Ádám, HARGITTAY Csenge, KALABAY László, TORZSA Péter

[Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric conditions in primary care, but still the ratio of treated patients is low. Clinically significant anxiousness decreases work efficacy and quality of life, it can cause and often goes with somatic and other psychiatric comorbidities. Patients with anxiety disorders usually undergo many diagnostic tests and interventions turning out negative on all levels of the health system. The general practitioner has a significant role in diagnosing and assessing anxiety disorders, based on a focused history, tests for differential diagnosis and questionnaire screening tools. The generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) is highly prevalent in primary care, appr. 8- 10%, 2-4 times frequent in women. Treat - ment is complex, evidence-based methods are available as certain lifestyle modifications, psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. A regular consultation with a psychiatrist colleague can improve the chronic care of patients with anxiety disorders.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Validation of the Hungarian version of Carlson’s Work-Family Conflict Scale

ÁDÁM Szilvia, KONKOLY THEGE Barna

Background and purpose - Work-family conflict has been associated with adverse individual (e.g., cardiovascular diseases, anxiety disorders), organizational (e.g., absenteeism, lower productivity), and societal outcomes (e.g., increased use of healthcare services). However, lack of standardized measurement has hindered the comparison of data across various cultures. The purpose of this study was to develop the Hungarian version of Carlson et al.’s multidimensional Work-Family Conflict Scale and establish its reliability and validity. Methods - In a sample of 557 employees (145 men and 412 women), we conducted confirmatory factor analysis to investigate the factor structure and factorial invariance of the instrument across sex and data collection points and evaluated the tool's validity by assessing relationships between its dimensions and scales measuring general, marital, and job-related stress, depressive symptomatology, vital exhaustion, functional somatic symptoms, and social support. Results - Our results showed that a six-factor model, similarly to that of the original instrument, fit the data best. Internal consistency of the six dimensions and the whole instrument was adequate. Convergent and divergent validity of the instrument and discriminant validity of the dimensions were also supported by our data. Conclusions - This study provides empirical support for the validity and reliability of the Hungarian version of the multidimensional Work-Family Conflict Scale. Deployment of this measure may allow for the generation of data that can be compared to those obtained in different cultural settings with the same instrument and hence advance our understanding of cross-cultural aspects of work-family conflict.