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Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 10, 2016

[Hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy]

MATOLTSY András

[Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is defined as an increase in the mass of the left ventricle. In addition to the absolute increase in mass, the geometric pattern of LVH also may be important. LVH can be secondary to an increase in wall thickness, an increase in cavity size, or both. LVH as a consequence of hypertension usually presents with an increase in wall thickness. This increase in mass predominantly results from a chronic increase in afterload of LV caused by the hypertension, although there is also a genetic component. A significant increase in the number and/or size of sarcomeres is the main pathologic mechanism, but hypertension may also result in interstitial fibrosis. The estimation of mass is commonly derived from measurements obtained by echocardiography. LVH is associated with increased incidence of systolic and/or diastolic dysfunction, heart failure, myocardial infarction, ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, aortic root dilatation, and a cerebrovascular event. The cardiovascular risk is directly related to the degree of mass. The regression of LVH is associated with a reduction in cardiovascular risk and improved cardiac function. Regression of LVH is associated with weight loss, dietary sodium restriction, and use of ACE inhibitors, ARBs, some calcium channel blockers, and some sympatholytic agents.]

Hypertension and nephrology

MARCH 20, 2015

[Effects of peripheral resistance lowering and elevating beta-blockers on central blood pressure - nebivolol in focus]

BENCZÚR Béla

[Central blood pressure, that is, blood pressure (BP) in the ascending aorta, is considered an important physiologic parameter as it reflects the hemodynamic relationship between the heart and the aorta, both in systole and in diastole. In the systolic phase, central BP represents the pressure against which the left ventricle has to eject blood during systolic contraction. Thus, central arterial pressure reflects both left ventricular stroke volume and afterload, defines cardiac work, and contributes to the development of left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive individuals. In the diastolic phase, central BP is a key determinant of the blood flow delivery to the myocardium. Despite the increasing knowledge regarding the importance of central blood pressure and the availability of non-invasive measurement technics it couldn’t spread in everyday clinical practice and rarely or not mentioned in the therapeutic guidelines. The different antihypertensiv drugs significantly differs based on their effects on central blood pressure particularly β-blockers. The so-called ’classical’ β-blockers have un - favourable effect on central blood pressure due to increasing peripherial vascular resistance. In the opposit the vasodilating β-blockers including nebivolol markedly decrease central blood pressure which could explain their beneficial effects.]