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Hungarian Immunology

MARCH 20, 2007

[Adalimumab in the treatment of Crohn’s disease]

LAKATOS Péter László

[Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder which may involve any part of gastrointestinal tract. The pathogenesis is only partially understood; various environmental and host (e.g. genetic-, epithelial-, immune and non-immune) factors are involved resulting in chronic uncontrolled inflammation, and among pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) seems to play a central role in CD. The last few years have witnessed a significant change in the management of Crohn’s disease. The role of and indications for conventional therapy (aminosalicylates, steroids and immunomodulators) have been reassessed. Over the past decade the increasing knowledge on the pathogenesis of CD led to the development of a number of biological agents targeting specific molecules involved in gut inflammation, first of all TNF-α and its receptors. The aim of this paper is to review the rationale for the use one of the new anti TNF-inhibitors, adalimumab in the treatment of CD.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 19, 2008

[PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS AND ITS PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENT MODALITIES]

KOÓ Éva

[Psoriatic arthritis is a destructive form of inflammatory arthritis that occurs in 10-30% of patients with psoriasis. Its prevalence is about 10.000 to 20.000 in Hungary. The pathogenesis includes both genetic and immunological factors. Average disease progression based on functional status is, on average, 0.05 HAQ score/year. The traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are not always successful in controlling the disease and preventing joint damage. Based on the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis, several new drugs (anti-tumour necrosis factor alfa, or anti-TNF-α) have been introduced in the therapy, which have been found to be effective both in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. The development of the Biological Response Modifying Drugs (BRMDs) makes treatment possible for patients with the most serious, high activity disease, who are refractory to other therapy. There is no significant difference in efficacy among the different biological agents (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab). The review presents the traditional DMARDs, as well as the indications, effectiveness, side effects and the national prescription regulations of the anti- TNF-alfa agents. Both DMARDs and TNF-α inhibitors can be safely used in psoriatic arthritis under strict specialist control.]

Hungarian Immunology

JANUARY 10, 2004

[TNF-α blocking therapy in rheumatoid arthritis]

TAMÁSI László

[The research of pathomechanism of rheumatoid arthritis resulted in remarkable pragmatic results beyond the important theoretical knowledge. These observations led to the development of new effective agents, which were named as biological therapy and introduced in clinical praxis. The key factor of pathomechanism of rheumatoid arthritis is the proinflammatoric citokin TNF-α. It can be found on the top of the inflammation cascade where regulates many other inflammatory mediators and also plays an important role in the defence against infections and tumours. The author describes the TNF-α blocking agents used in clinical practice, their chemical and pharmacological feature, as well as their mode of action and the consequence of inhibition of TNF-α. He reviews the main results of the major clinical tests with infliximab, etanercet, and adalimumab. The results of these clinical studies demonstrate that the TNF-α blocking therapy gives clinical improvement in case of therapy resistant patients, decreases the number of swollen and tender joints, the pain, ESR and CRP, decreases the radiological progression, furthermore improves the quality of life. There are also some data about the favourable impacts observed during the early arthritis treatment. The TNF-α blocking therapy can be used effectively and safely in rheumatoid arthritis. In most cases the infusion reaction and the injection site reaction are not reasons for withdrawal from the study. The sideeffects, however, developed in increasing numbers during widespread applications. Among these the most important ones are the opportunist infection and the tuberculosis. In addition the sporadic occurrence of lupus-like symptoms, demyelinating disease, and aplastic anemia were reported. The fundamental requirements of the safety of the biological therapy are the professional indication and the careful monitoring during the treatment, the principle of which has been already prepared by the Professional College of the Rheumatology and Physiotherapy based on the international experience.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 19, 2007

[ANTI-TNF-α ANTIBODY THERAPY IN CROHN’S DISEASE]

LAKATOS Péter László

[Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder which may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Its pathogenesis is only partially understood; various environmental and host (e.g., genetic, epithelial, immune and nonimmune) factors are involved, together initiating a chronic uncontrolled inflammation, which is partly due to an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and a defective apoptosis of lamina propria T cells. Among proinflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor- α (TNF-α) seems to play a central role in Crohn’s disease. Over the past years, the increasing knowledge on the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease has led to the development of a number of biological agents targeting specific molecules involved in gut inflammation, including TNF-α and its receptors. This paper reviews the rationale for the use of TNF-α inhibitors in the treatment of Crohn’s disease.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 20, 2011

[Effective adalimumab treatment of a steroid-dependent Crohns’ disease patient suffering from general, abdominal and joint symptoms of multiple etiology]

JUHÁSZ Márk, TÓTH Zsuzsanna, MIHELLER Pál, SZŰTS Ildikó, GAÁL Ramóna, PÁPAY Judit, PREGUN István, TULASSAY Zsolt, RÁCZ Károly, MŰZES Györgyi

[The 69-year-old male patient had been suffering from periodically relapsing rheumatological symptoms involving variable localisations (knee, ankle, MTP, sternoclavicular and hip joint) since 1964. On the basis of his joint symptoms, load-independent lower back pain, sacroileitis, recurrent iridocyclitis, urethroprostatitis and oral aphtous lesions, Reiter disease was diagnosed in 2000. The patient had Lyme-disease (confirmed Borrelia burgdorferi seropositivity) with peripheral facial paresis in 2003. The patients joint problems relapsed in 2006, accompanied by diarrhoea and fever, independent of any infecions. The possibility of IBD could not be confirmed either by macroscopic examination using colonoscopy or hystology. The patient was admitted to our department in March 2008 for the first time, presenting again with joint pain and disability of gait, 7-8 bowel movements a day, and fever. Taken together the clinical symptoms, the typical radiological findings and HLA-B27 positivity, Bechterew disease was diagnosed. Colonoscopy performed because of diarrhea revealed multiple segmental aphtoid lesions and irregular ulcers, suggesting Crohn disease that was confirmed by histology (cryptal abscess formation and microgranulomas). Sulfasalazin, 5-ASA, and other NSAIDs applied to treat rheumatological symptoms could not eliminate either the gastrointestinal or the rheumatological symptoms of the patient, which necessitated regular steroid therapy. Because of the patient’s steroid dependency, and considering his rheumatological symptoms, in June 2008 he was treated with adalimumab (ADA) induction therapy (80-40-40 mg s.c.). In two weeks, his gastrointestinal as well as extraintestinal symptoms substantially improved, and completely diminished through the course of maintenance ADA therapy (40mg weekly). The patient is still asymptomatic and is excercising (jogging) regularly.]

Hungarian Immunology

MARCH 20, 2007

[Adalimumab treatment in inflammatory joint diseases]

SZÁNTÓ Sándor

[The development of anti-TNF-α agents represents a great advance in the treatment of inflammatory joint diseases. Adalimumab is the first fully human, recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibody that blocks the interaction of TNF with the p55 and p75 cell surface TNF receptors, thereby neutralising the activity of this cytokine. In well designed, placebocontrolled trials adalimumab significantly reduced symptoms, improved quality of life, and reduced radiologically evident joint damage in patients with rheumatoid athritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arhritis. The drug was generally well tolerated, and the follow up studies confirmed, that the incidence of serious adverse events was similar to that generally seen in patients not receiving anti-TNF agents. This review summarises the recent available data related to the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in inflammatory joint diseases.]