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Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[Attachment as a predictor of risk for eating disorders on a representative hungarian adult sample]

SZALAI Dömötör Tamás, CZEGLÉDI Edit

[Background and purpose – Many studies confirm the relationship between attachment disturbances and (the severity of) eating disorders, however among them only one Hungarian study can be found. The exact predisposing traits of attachment and the strength of relationship is still uncleared. Our aim was to explore these aspects. Methods – Study was based on a cross-sectional nationally representative survey, called „Hungarostudy 2013” (N=2000, 46.9% males, mean age 46.9 years, SD=18.24 years). Measures: Sociodemographic and self-reported anthropometric data (weight and height), short Hungarian version of Relationship Scale Questionnaire, SCOFF questionnaire and short Hungarian version of Beck Depression Inventory. Results – The frequency of risk for eating disorders (anorexia or bulimia nervosa) was 3.9% (N=76) among the respondents (N=1860). Attachment anxiety was significantly higher in the risk for eating disorders group (t(1888)=-3.939, p<0.001), and significantly predicted the risk for eating disorders after adjusting for the potential background variables (OR=1.09, p=0.040). Detachment was not a significant predictor of risk for eating disorders (OR=0.98, p=0.515). Younger age (OR=0.97, p<0.001), higher level of depression (OR=1.09, p<0.001) and higher body mass index (OR=1.08, p<0.001) were also significant cross-sectional predictors of risk for eating disorders. The explained variance of the model was 10.7%. Conclusion – The study supported, that higher attachment anxiety is associated with the increased risk of eating disorders, with a possible therapeutic relevance. Assessment of attachment’s further aspects and creating multivariable models are required for more thorough understanding and optimising of intervention points.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

[Hungarian adaptation of a short eating disorder questionnaire (SCOFF)]

DUKAY-SZABÓ Szilvia, SIMON Dávid, VARGA Márta, SZABÓ Pál, TÚRY Ferenc, RATHNER Günther

[Aim - Eating disorders are becoming an increasingly relevant health issue, therefore the fast and accurate screening of people at risk is of great practical importance. The aim of SCOFF questionnaire is to assess this risk and the extent to which a person is affected, by using five simple yes or no questions. The objective of our study was to assess the validity of the Hungarian version of the test Methods - 777 medical students (210 men, 567 women, mean age 22.3±2.33 years) participated in the survey. The online questionnaire contained anthropometric data, the Eating Behaviour Severity Scale and, beside the SCOFF, the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Results - The SCOFF is excellent at screening clinical eating disorders. Its sensitivity was 100% and specificity 85.1%. It is less efficient at detecting subclinical cases, but it does not show worse results than EDI. According to the data SCOFF is better at identifying more serious cases. Applying on the same sample SCOFF had higher sensitivity and lower specificity than EDI. Discussion - SCOFF is suitable for primary screening of eating disorders with a non-diagnostic purpose, taken two “yes” answers out of five as the critical margin, specified by the authors.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 20, 2016

[The value of the SCOFF questionnaire in the screening of eating disorders]

DUKAY-SZABÓ Szilvia, VARGA Márta, TÚRY Ferenc

[Having become an increasingly relevant health issue from the second half of the 20th century, eating disorders have presented the need for screening, carried out in the simplest possible way, by a short questionnaire. Morgan and his colleagues identified this necessity and in 1999 created the SCOFF test to screen eating disorders with five yes or no questions. The questionnaire promptly became popular due to its briefness and easy adaptability. It was translated into several languages, its validity was measured on numerous populations. According to the results SCOFF is suitable for primary screening of eating disorders with a non-diagnostic purpose, taken two “yes” answers out of five as the critical margin, specified by the authors. Our objective was to give a review of the history of the SCOFF questionnaire.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

Hungarian experiences with the Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale

CZEGLÉDI Edit, SZABÓ Kornélia

Background and purpose - Sociocultural influences regarding bodily appearance and their psychological consequences play a considerable role in the development and maintenance of body image disturbance and eating disorders. The purpose of the study was to explore the psychometric properties of the Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale-Revised and its correlates among young adults in Hungary. Methods - In our cross-sectional online study, participants were 18-35 years old (N=820, 40% male). Measures: self-reported anthropometric data, Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale-Revised, Eating Disorder Inventory, SCOFF questionnaire, Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3, and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Results - The exploratory factor analysis showed that the fit indices of the three-factor solution are acceptable (c2(171)=5124.8, p<0.001, CFI=0.944, TLI=0.918, RMSEA=0.054, SRMR=0.030). Along the original ‘Importance of being thin’ and the ‘Importance of being fit’ factors, a third factor emerged, namely the ’Life fulfilment aspect of attractiveness’ factor. Internal consistency and construct validity of the scales were confirmed. Among those who were at risk of developing an eating disorder, all of the measured beliefs were significantly greater than among those who were not at risk (thin: Z=6.501, p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.63, fit: t(818)=-4.749, p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.41, and life fulfilment: t(239)=-5.702, p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.53). Conclusion - The Hungarian version of the Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale-Revised is a reliable, valid measure and we suggest its introduction into Hungarian research. Relationships between beliefs about attractiveness and self-esteem, body image and eating disorders suggest intervention opportunities in with regards to prevention and treatment of eating disorders.