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Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2014

[HANS SELYE 70 YEARS LATER: STEROIDS, STRESS ULCERS & H. PYLORI]

SZABÓ Sándor

[Although Hans Selye is mostly known for his discovery & development of the stress concept, he also introduced the first physiologically sound, structure-activity classification of steroids that was also based on the chemical structure of steroids in 1943. He not only introduced the names of glucocorticoids & mineralocorticoids but discovered the anti- & pro-inflammatory properties, respectively, of these steroids in animal models. Furthermore, he not only described the first stress-induced gastric ulcers in rats (1936) & characterized the first human ‘stress ulcers’ during the air-raids in London during World War II (1943). Thus, Selye was a much more productive & creative scientist than it is generally considered.]

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

[Hypertensive and cardiovascular risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs]

FARSANG Csaba, BEDROS J. Róbert, ALFÖLDI Sándor

[Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most frequently used medicines. During the last ten years several original publications, reviews and meta-analyses were published on the cardiovascular safety of NSAIDs and the results underlined their potentially harmful cardiovascular side effects. It can also be emphasized that there are substantial differences between different compounds, and the CV risk does not depend on the ratio of COX-1/COX-2 selectivity. Cardiovascular risk can be increased by all NSAIDs and paracetamol with the possible exception of naproxen and probably aceclofenac.]

LAM KID

SEPTEMBER 20, 2012

[The effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on articular cartilage]

GÁTI Tamás, JUHÁSZ István, ROJKOVICH Bernadette

[In developed countries, the treatment of osteoarthritis costs up to 1-2% of the GNP. The poor hygroscopy of hyaline cartilage and of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) molecules that are components of proteoglycans plays a key role in the development of the disease. Age-related osteoarthritis mostly affects the weight-bearing joints of the lower extremities, the hips and knees, and - more frequently than the former ones - the small joints of the hands, causing chronic pain and disability. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used for the treatment of osteoarthritis-related pain influence not only pain but also cartilage metabolism, and - among others - GAG molecules. NSAIDs diminish the biosynthesis of prostaglandins (PG) that have a role in inflammatory processes, and influence oxygen free radicals, the levels of interleukins (ILs) and the function of metalloproteinases. The ideal NSAID for the joints stimulates cartilage formation, reduces cartilage resorption, and the level of katabolic cytokines. Aceclofenac was found to have the most beneficial effect on multiple aspects of cartilage metabolism.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 10, 2005

[THE SELECTIVE COX-2 INHIBITOR MELOXICAM AND SALICYLATE THERAPY]

TÓTH Károly

[Although during treatment of arthrosis with meloxicam the level of thromboxan A2 decreases, thrombocyte functions are not affected. Meloxicam in therapeutic doses doesn’t increase the risk of haemorrhage. Previously it was suspected that coadministration of salicylates with certain other non-steroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) will suppress the effect of salicylate. Van Ryn et al have proved that this is not the case with salicylate plus meloxicam therapy. It is hypothesized that meloxicam loosely binds to the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) enzyme and salicylate can easily replace it.]

AUGUST 15, 2011

USE OF DRUGS FOR GASTRIC ACID REDUCTION IN GENERAL PRACTICE

HAJNAL Ferenc

In order to facilitate (general) practitioner’s therapeutic decisions, this overview reviews advantages and disadvantages of three drug classes used for acid reduction, as to antacids, histamine 2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs), and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The possibilities and mechanisms of gastric acid reduction are detailed. This can be achieved either by neutralization of gastric acid by systemic or non-systemic antacids, or by inhibiting acid secretion by H2RAs and PPIs. PPIs are the strongest acid reducing agents indispensable in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori ulcers and Zollinger- Ellison syndrome, and they are first choice in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy, epigastric pain syndrome, and functional upper GI dyspepsia. Nonetheless, antacids and H2RAs are faster in relieving pain in the latter pain syndrome and in acute heartburn. Contraindications and adverse effects of these three drug classes are also detailed. The author has concluded that physicians’ up-to-date awareness of these compounds’ pharmacological properties contributes to their ability to tailor acid reduction therapy to patients’ individual needs. Refreshing and expanding this knowledge will finally benefit patients seen in everyday practice.

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 20, 2007

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

APRIL 21, 2009

[USE OF DRUGS FOR GASTRIC ACID REDUCTION IN GENERAL PRACTICE]

HAJNAL Ferenc

[In order to facilitate (general) practitioner’s therapeutic decisions, this overview reviews advantages and disadvantages of three drug classes used for acid reduction, as to antacids, histamine 2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs), and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The possibilities and mechanisms of gastric acid reduction are detailed. This can be achieved either by neutralization of gastric acid by systemic or non-systemic antacids, or by inhibiting acid secretion by H2RAs and PPIs. PPIs are the strongest acid reducing agents indispensable in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori ulcers and Zollinger- Ellison syndrome, and they are first choice in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy, epigastric pain syndrome, and functional upper GI dyspepsia. Nonetheless, antacids and H2RAs are faster in relieving pain in the latter pain syndrome and in acute heartburn. Contraindications and adverse effects of these three drug classes are also detailed. The author has concluded that physicians’ up-to-date awareness of these compounds’ pharmacological properties contributes to their ability to tailor acid reduction therapy to patients’ individual needs. Refreshing and expanding this knowledge will finally benefit patients seen in everyday practice.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 16, 2007

[NSAID-ASSOCIATED GASTROPATHY: RECENT ASPECTS OF PREVENTION]

HERSZÉNYI László

[Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used drugs worldwide. Gastroduodenal ulcers are found at endoscopy in 15 to 30% of patients who use NSAIDs regularly. The annual incidence of severe upper gastrointestinal complications such as bleeding or perforation is 1.0 to 1.5%. From a cost-benefit perspective, prevention strategies should consider both gastrointestinal, and recently, cardiovascular risk factors. No prophylaxis is necessary with low gastrointestinal risk. There are currently four possible strategies to reduce the risk of adverse gastrointestinal effects: 1. the use of selective COX-2 inhibitors or coxibs rather than traditional NSAIDs; 2. cotherapy, primarily with proton pump inhibitors, to ensure protection to gastric mucous membrane; 3. co-therapy with a coxib and a proton pump inhibitor in patients with very high risk (eg., history of bleeding); 4. eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with a history of ulcer. The use of coxibs decrease the risk of gastrointestinal damage by roughly 50%. In the presence of gastrointestinal risk factors or for patients on aspirin also treated with an NSAID or a coxib, protection with a proton pump inhibitor is recommended. Proton pump inhibitor therapy is also useful for the prevention and treatment of NSAID-induced dyspepsia. The beneficial effects of proton pump inhibitors cannot solely be explained by their profound antisecretory action. Therefore, several acid secretion- independent mechanisms of action have been proposed.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 30, 2004

[PHARMACEUTICAL PREVENTION OF THE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL SIDE-EFFECTS OF NSAID THERAPY]

HERSZÉNYI László, TULASSAY Zsolt

[Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce pain and inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. However, they are also associated with a significant risk of gastrointestinal events with clinical and economic consequences. It is mandatory to rationalise the use of different NSAID treatment strategies in patients with varying degrees of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risk. In patients for those aged <65 years with no previous gastrointestinal event and not concurrently on aspirin (low risk patients), the use of an NSAID should be considered as appropriate. For patients with a previous gastrointestinal event (high risk patients) or who concurrently received aspirin, an NSAID alone should be rated as inappropriate and either a coxib or selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, or an NSAID + proton pump inhibitor combination is considered as appropriate. Finally, for patients aged >65 years with a previous gastrointestinal event and on aspirin (patients with very high risk) a coxib in conjunction with a proton pump inhibitor is considered to be the best therapeutic strategy.]