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Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[The pain-trigger role of cytokines in the nervous system – the direct analgesic effect of anti-cytokine therapy ]

HODINKA László, VERECKEI Edit

[Nociceptive, neuropathic and central me­chanisms are involved in the perception, transmission and processing of chronic pain and shaping of cerebral pain image. Alar­mins – molecules alarming defence and signing the presence of pathogens and tissue damage - trigger a series of pathogenic events resulting in inflammatory pain stimuli. Proinflammatory cytokines play a determining role in the pain perception at the level of the nervous system. Continuous inflammatory stimuli while sensitizing the periferic and central neurons activate the pain-related cerebral areas and develop the complex pain image, the pain matrix. Ce­reb­ral functional connections are operating in networks and can be visualized by functional MRI. Cytokines activate the neurons directly or indirectly by other neuromediators. Cytokine receptors are expressed on no­ciceptors and even on higher-level neurons and on various non-neural cells, such as microglia and astrocytes. The most ubiquitous cytokines are the Tumour Necrosis Factor and Interleukin 6 in the nervous sys­tem. The signaling pathways are the Nuclear Factor κB and the Janus-kinase enzyme system. The proinflammatory cytokines and the Janus-kinase are therefore primary therapeutic targets. Anti-cytokine biologicals and small molecular kinase inhibitors decrease the pain and improve functional activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Decrease of pain was more pronounced than expected only from the decrease of the clinical biomarkers of inflammation. The early and ra­pid painkiller effect of targeted biological and chemical-biological response modifiers is attributed to their direct analgesic effect on the brain.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[The diagnostic and management challenges for posterior reversible leucoencephalopathy syndrome]

KILIC COBAN Eda, GEZ Sedat, KARA Batuhan, SOYSAL Aysun

[Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by epileptic seizures, headaches, altered mental status and focal neurological signs. Hypertension is the second most common condition associated with PRES. The 50-year-old-male patient with right-sided hemiparesis and speech disturbances admitted to our clinic. His blood pressure at the emergency service was 220/140 mmHg. A left putaminal hematoma was seen in his CT and MRI. In his brain MRI, FLAIR and T2 –weighted sequences showed bilateral symmetric diffuse hyperintensities in the brain stem, basal ganglia, and occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal lobes. After the intense antihypertensive drug treatment, his blood pressure came to normal limits within a week. During his hospitalisation he had a recurrent speech disturbance lasting an hour. His electroencephalography was normal. In his repeated diffusion weighted MRI, an acute lacunary infarct was seen on right centrum semiovale. Two months later, the control MRI showed only the previous lacuner infarcts and the chronic putaminal hematoma. We presented a case developping either a cerebral hemorrhage or a lacunar infarction due to PRES. The main reason of the following complications of the disease was delayed diagnosis. Uncontrolled hypertension was guilted for the events. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

[Heart failure with mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF) and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF)]

NYOLCZAS Noémi

[reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is well-known. Physicians are well versed in diagnosing and treating the disease. At the same time, our knowledge is scarce about heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and heart failure with mid-ranged ejection fraction (HFmrEF). We are diagnosing these cases in a much lower number than the actual ones, and we have no morbidity and mortality-reducing evidence for treating the disease. The summary is intended to provide an overview of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, morbidity and mortality, treatment options, the importance of the etiological diagnosis and long-term follow- up of HFmrEF and HFpEF based on currently available literature.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

[Correction of the physiological artefacts at pre-surgical clinical functional MR]

KISS Máté, GÁL Andor Viktor, KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf, MARTOS János, NAGY Zoltán

[Introduction/aim of the study - Pre-surgical functional MRI (fMRI) is an important modality of examinations before brain surgery. There are several artefacts (e.g. motion, susceptibility) which may hinder the evaluation of fMRI data. Physiological artefacts (breathing, pulsation) also affect the sensitivity and specificity of anatomical localization. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the efficiency of physiological artefact identification and removal methods for presurgical evaluation. Materials and methods - Siemens Magnetom Verio 3T MRI scanner was used to collect data. The physiological parameters (breathing, pulse) were recorded with the MRI system’s built-in devices. Data from fourteen patients - with primary brain tumour - were evaluated with SPM12 utilizing the RETROICOR/RVHR tool to detect and decrease the effect of physiological artefacts. We compared the statistical maps obtained with and without the physiological correction using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, and ROI analyses. Results - Significant differences were found in the mean ROI values (p<0.0016) and the extensions of eloquent activations (p<0.0013), when using the physiological correction (RETORICOR/RVHR) based on convolution method. On the other hand, no significant differences were found between the ROIs’ standard deviations (F=0.28). The RETROICOR/ RVHR method helps to define the precise localisation of eloquent areas (p<0.009). The number of irrelevant (non-significant) voxels were increased (p<0.001). Conclusions - Minimising of physiological artefacts in fMRI data calculations, the (RETROICOR/RVHR) method based on convolution has been successfully adapted. This algorithm could be helpful before neurosurgical intervention. The activity pattern became more reliable. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2019

Cerebral cavernous malformation type 1 with retinal blood vessel tortuosity and KRIT1 gene mutation

KALMÁR Tibor, MARÓTI Zoltán, VADVÁRI Árpád, HALMOSI Ágnes, KÁLOVITS Ferenc, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) represent a relatively rare and heterogeneous clinical entity with mutations identified in three genes. Both sporadic and familial forms have been reported. We present a young female patient with episodic paresthesia and headaches, but without acute neurological deficits. Her mother had a hemorrhaged cavernoma surgically removed 21 years ago. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple cavernous malformations in the size of a few millimeters and the ophthalmologic exam detected retinal blood vessel tortuosity in the proband. Targeted exome sequencing analysis identified a nonsense mutation in exon 16 of the KRIT1 gene, which resulted in a premature stop codon and a truncated protein underlying the abnormal development of cerebral and retinal blood vessels. This mutation with pathogenic significance has been reported before. Our case points to the importance of a thorough clinical and molecular work up despite the uncertain neurological complaints, since life style recommendations, imaging monitoring and genetic counseling may have major significance in the long term health of the patient.

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2019

[F-DOPA PET/MR based target definiton in the 3D based radiotherapy treatment of glioblastoma multiforme patients. First Hungarian experiences ]

SIPOS Dávid, TÓTH Zoltán, LUKÁCS Gábor, BAJZIK Gábor, HADJIEV Janaki, CSELIK Zsolt, REPA Imre, KOVÁCS Árpád

[Introduction - Radiotherapy plays important role in the complex oncological treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The modern 3D radiotherapy treatments are based on cross-sectional CT and MR information, however more attention is being paid to functional hybrid imaging describing the biological and functional morphology of tumor lesions. 18F-DOPA is an amino acid tracer with high specificity and sensitivity, which may play an important role in the precise definition of target volume in the irradiation process of GBM patients. Our study presents the first experiences with 18F-DOPA based PET/CT/MR 3D irradiation planning process. Methods - In Hungary the 18F-DOPA radiotracer has been available for clinical use since September 2017. Between September 2017 and January 2018, at the Somogy County Kaposi Mór Teaching Hospital Dr. József Baka Diagnostic, Radiation Oncology, Research and Teaching Center 3 histologically verified glioblastoma multiforme patients received 18F-DOPA based 3D irradiation treatment. In the contouring process the native planning CT scanes were fused with the PET/MR series (T1 contrast enhanced, T2 and 18F-DOPA sequences). We defined 18F-DOPA uptake volume (BTV-F-DOPA), the T1 contrast enhanced MRI volume (GTV-T1CE), and the volume of the area covered by oedema on the T2 weighted MRI scan (CTV-oedema) in all patients. We also registered the BTV-F-DOPA volumes not covered by the conventional MR based target volumes. Results - Examining the 3 cases, the average volume of 18F-DOPA tumor was 22.7 cm3 (range 15.3-30.9; SD = 7.82). The average GTV T1 CE was found to be 8.7 cm3 (range 3.8-13.2; SD = 4.70). The mean CTV oedema volume was 40.3 cm3 (range 27.7-57.7; SD = 15.36). A non-overlapping target volume difference (BTV-F-DOPA not covered by CTV oedema area) was 4.5 cm3 (range 1-10.3; SD = 5.05) for PTV definition. Conclusion - Based on our results the tumor area defined by the amino acid tracer is not fully identical with the MRI defined T2 oedema CTV. 18F-DOPA defined BTV can modify the definiton of the PTV, and the radiotherapy treatment. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2018

[Online supplementay figure to the article titled Novel structured MRI reporting system in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy - issues of development and first use experiences]

LAKATOS Andrea, KOLOSSVÁRY Márton, SZABÓ Miklós, JERMENDY Ágnes, BAGYURA Zsolt, BARSI Péter, RUDAS Gábor, KOZÁK R. Lajos

[Online supplementay figure to the article titled Novel structured MRI reporting system in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy - issues of development and first use experiences]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2018

Novel structured MRI reporting system in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy - issues of development and first use experiences

LAKATOS Andrea, KOLOSSVÁRY Márton, SZABÓ Miklós, JERMENDY Ágnes, BAGYURA Zsolt, BARSI Péter, RUDAS Gábor, KOZÁK R. Lajos

Purpose - To develop an evidence-based, standardized structured reporting (SR) method for brain MRI examinations in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) suitable both for clinical and research use. Materials and methods - SR template development was based on comprehensive review of the pertinent literature with the basic sections and subdivisions of the template defined according to MRI sequences (both conventional and diffusion-weighted, MR-spectroscopy (MRS), and T2*-weighted imaging), and the items targeted on age-related imaging patterns of HIE. In order to evaluate the usability of the proposed SR template we compared data obtained from the brain MR image analysis of 87 term and 19 preterm neonates with the literature. The enrolled 106 infants were born between 2013 and 2015, went through therapeutic hypothermia according to the TOBY criteria due to moderate to severe asphyxia and had at least one brain MRI examination within the first two weeks of life. Ethical approval was obtained for this retrospective study. Descriptive statistical analysis was also performed on data exported from the structured reporting system as feasibility test. Results - The mean gestational age of the study population was 38.3±2.2 weeks; brain MRI was performed on 5.8±2.9 day of life, hence in 78% of our patients after the conclusion of therapeutic hypothermia. Our main imaging findings were concordant to the pertinent literature. Moreover, we identified a characteristic temporal evolution of diffusion changes. Interestingly 18% (n=19/106) of the clinically asphyxiated infants had isolated axial-extraaxial haemorrhage without any imaging sign of HIE. Conclusion - In this article our approach of reporting HIE cases with our novel SR template is described. The SR template was found suitable for reporting HIE cases, moreover it uncovered time and location dependent evolution of diffusion abnormalities (and pseudonormalization, as well), suggesting its usefulness in clinical research applications. The high number of isolated intracranial haemorrhages, and the changing diffusion pattern emphasizes the importance of early imaging in HIE.

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2018

Atypical type of Hirayama disease: Onset of proximal upper extremity

AYAS Özözen Zeynep, ASIL Kıyasettin

Hirayama disease is a rare, benign motor neuron disease. It has been proposed that the dura mater’s posterior wall lacks sufficient elasticity in the lower cervical region and this causes the tense dura part to displace anteriorly upon flexion. The disease is described as involving unilateral upper extremity with a distal-onset. We reported weakness and atrophy of the proximal part of an extremity in a 45-year-old man who is diagnosed with Hirayama disease. Proximal onset is a rare type of Hirayama Disease. Clinicians must be alert of proximal involvement and the diagnosis should be confirmed with electrophysiological and flexion MRI studies.

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2018

[The role of MRI in measuring the effectivity of disease modifying treatments I]

TÓTH Eszter, BENCSIK Krisztina, VÖRÖS Erika, FRICSKA-NAGY Zsanett, FÜVESI Judit, RAJDA Cecília, CSOMOR Angéla, PALKÓ András, VÉCSEI László, KINCSES Zsigmond Tamás

[MRI has a significant role in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. The newer and newer treatment options of the disease make it necessary to monitor the effectiveness of the therapy. Besides the clinical signs (clinical relapses and progression), the different MRI parameters can also reflect the disease activity. In our current article we summarize those MRI markers, which best predict the long-term disability, based on the international standards.]