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Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

Long term follow-up of lesional and non-lesional patients with electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep

HEGYI Márta, SIEGLER Zsuzsa, FOGARASI András, BARSI Péter, HALÁSZ Péter

Objectives – A retrospective study has been done at the Bethesda Children’s Hospital Epilepsy Center with those patients whose EEG records fulfilled in one or more records the criteria of electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep (ESES) pattern, occupying at least 75% of NREM sleep with bilateral discharges, and had detailed disease history and long term follow-up data, between 2000 and 2012. Patients and methods – Thirty-three patients (mean 11.1±4.2 years of age) were studied by 171 sleep EEG records. Sleep was recorded after sleep deprivation or during spontaneous sleep at least for one hour length of NREM. From the 492 EEGs, 171 sleep records were performed (average five/patient). Average follow-up time was 7.5 years. Eighty-two ESES records have been analyzed in 15 non-lesional and 18 lesional (11 with dysgenetic and seven with perinatal - asphyxic or vascular origin) patients. Variability of seizure types, seizure frequency and frequency of status epilepticus was higher in the lesional group. Impairment of the cognitive functions was moderate and partial in the non-lesional, while severely damaged in the lesional group. Results – EEG records of 29 patients showed unihemispherial spike fields with a perpendicular axis (in anterior, medial and posterior variants) to the Sylvian fissure, regardless their lesional or non-lesional origin. Only three (1one non-lesional and two lesional) patients had bilateral synchronous spike-wave discharges with bilateral symmetric frontocentral spike fields. The individual discharges of the sleep EEG pattern were very similar to the awake interictal records except their extension in time and field, their increased number, amplitude, and continuity of them and furthermore in the increased trans-hemispheral propagation and their synchronity. Conclusions – Assumed circuits involved in the pathomechanism of discharges during NREM sleep in ESES are discussed based on our findings.

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 20, 2019

[Physical inactivity and activity. Damage and benefit]

KÉKES Ede, APOR Péter

[Authors address the issue of inadequate physical activity worldwide and analyze their relationship with cardiovascular diseases and total mortality. In the inactivity "world map" it can be seen that in economically developed countries it is very common but other ethnic and regional factors also play a role and it is significantly more frequent at women. In our country this phenomenon due to combination of advanced civilization and computerization is also frequent. From 2000 to 2015, the trend of the presence of physical inactivity (FI) in the high income populations is steadily rising. Convincing evidence suggests that FI increases the risk of many common, serious diseases, including ischaemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes, breast cancer and colon carcinoma, and reduces the life expectancy. For these four diaseses, the incidence of FI occurs in about 1/3 of cases and 35% of total mortality. Its health value (PAF) ranges from 10 to 18%. Low (non-regular) exercise increases the risk of hypertension with or without family history. In subjects with moderate and intensive levels of physical activity (FA), there is a significantly lower mortality rate and the rate of occurrence of major cardiovasculars (CV) diseases compared to those with lower grade FA. Behind the positive effect of physical activity there is a multiple and complicated mechanism that manifests itself in the vascular system, in the physiological adaptation of the heart and in other metabolic and cellular effects. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2019

[Epidemiology, cost and economic impact of cerebral palsy in Hungary]

FEJES Melinda, VARGA Beatrix, HOLLÓDY Katalin

[Objective - The purpose of our communication was to determine the total cost of cerebral paretic patients in Hungary between 0 and 18 years and to assess their impact on the national budget. Methods - Based on the data of Borsod county we calculated the CP characteristics. The cost of CP was determined by routine care of individuals. Lost Parental Income and Tax were calculated on the basis of average earnings. The ratio of GDP, Health and Social Budget and Health Budget to CP is based on CP annual average cost and frequency. We have developed a repeatable computational model. Results - Of the risk groups, premature birth (30.97%), low birth weight (29.64%), perinatal asphyxia (19.47%) were the most common. Source is unknown of 37.61% of the cases. CP prevalence was 2.1‰. The two-sided (59.7%) and the one-sided (19.0%) spastic pareses dominated. The most serious form is the two-sided spastic paresis (42.5% GMFCS 3-5 degrees). Epilepsy was 22.0%, incontinence was 27%, mental involvement was 46%. Care for one child up to 18 years of age costs an average of 73 million HUF (€ 251,724). The lost family income was 27.36 million HUF (€ 94,345), and lost tax and health care contributions were 14.46 million HUF (€ 49,862). Additionally, 0.525% of the GDP, 0.88% of the full health and social budget and 1.83% of direct medical costs were spent for CP families. Conclusion - The cost of CP disease is significant. Costs can be reduced by improving primary prevention. From the perspective of the family and government, it is better to care for families so they can take care of their disabled children.]