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Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2019

[The Expanded Disability Status Scale scoring in patients with multiple sclerosis]

FÜVESI Judit

[Gait disturbance is a major symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was first used in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis for the assessment of disability, however it has become more and more widely used in clinical practice as well. Nowadays its use is essential in application of the new diagnostic criteria, the new clinical form classification and in monitoring the efficacy of therapies. EDSS is based on a standardised neurological examination, but focuses on those symptoms that are frequent in multiple sclerosis. Based on the examination it assesses seven functional systems: visual, brainstem, pyramidal, cerebellar, sensory, bowel-bladder and cerebral functions. EDSS scores can be determined based on the scores given in the functional systems and on testing the walking distance. In newer versions the “Ambulation score” has been added. This chapter clarifies the scores based on the maximal walking distance and the need for a walking aid to walk this distance. The Neurostatus/EDSS training method improves the reproducibility of the standardised neurological examination that forms the basis of the EDSS scoring. Of the tests assessing walking, the Timed-25 Foot Walk Test and the self-administered 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale are suitable for routine evaluation of walking performance. An increase of more than 20% in the Timed-25 Foot Walk may be considered a significant change in gait. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2019

Evaluation of body image perception in multiple sclerosis patients without neurological deficit

SENGUL S Hakan, SENGUL Yildizhan, TAK Zeynel Abidin Ali, KOCAK Müge, TUNC Abdulkadir

Objective - There is a lack of research on the association between body image perception (BIP) and multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to evaluate BIP in MS patients and its correlation with depression, anxiety, duration of the disease, and sociodemographic characteristics of the patients. Methods - Fifty patients with MS who applied to our outpatient clinic were examined. Forty-five healthy control were recruited for the study. All patients were diagnosed with MS according to 2010 revisions of McDonald criteria. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was performed by the same neurologist for all patients. The participants were asked to complete a sociodemographic form, Body Cathexis Scale (BCS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Results - The mean BCS score was 86.54 ± 32.24 in MS patients and 155.00 ± 20.90 in the healthy subjects (p<0.001). While MS patients had significantly higher anxiety levels, depression scores were similar in both groups. The mean BAI score was 18.50 ± 14.03 for MS patients and 10.06 ± 7.96 in the control group (p=0.001). The BDI score of the patients was 13.77 ± 11.61 and 11.91 ± 8.65 for the controls (p=0.34). Early age of the disease onset, increased number of attacks, increased depressive symptoms, and higher anxiety levels were significantly correlated with higher BCS scores. Age and being single/ divorced/ widowed were also correlated with BCS scores. Conclusions - It is important to preserve the mental well-being of patients. Even in apparently healthy patients, the body perception may be severely impaired.

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2017

[Is second-line immunomodulatory treatment effective in multiple sclerosis?]

RÁCZ Lilla, BERÉNYI Ervin, BARSI Péter, BERNÁTH Dávid, CSÉPÁNY Tünde

[Purpose - Natalizumab is the first evidence based monoclonal antibody, which was launched for treatment in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis in Hungary in 2010. Standardized follow-up is required to use it. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and to monitor the safety of natalizumab treatment by using an electronic database established for MS registry. Clinical activity was measured by annual relapse rates, functional status of patients measured by EDSS and MFSC. Radiological activity was evaluated by standard MRI protocol. Data, results of MS patients and side effects of natalizumab treatment were recorded in iMed software. Results - 31 patients started the natalizumab treatment after 6.5±5.8 years from the onset of MS. The efficacy of treatment was evaluated after a mean of 67 (min: 14 max: 128) infusions in December 2016. The drop-out rate was low, due to the presence of neutralising antibodies in one case, pregnancy in two cases and development of malignant disease in one case which was not related to the natalizumab treatment. The treatment was well tolerated with excellent compliance without serious side effects. The annual relapse rate reduced from a mean of 1.7 to 0.03 (p<0.000001) in the first 12 months of treatment compared to the pretreatment 12 month activity, and it stayed at low level during the whole follow up. EDSS was stable or improved with an exception of two cases. In 23 subjects (77%) lack of new/enlarging T2 lesions and lack of gadolineum-enhancing lesions on MRI were observed. 18 patients (60%) had no evidence of disease activity (NEDA-3). PASAT test improved in most of the cases. Conclusion - The natalizumab therapy was very effective in all cases including those patients who had active disease under the previous immunomodulatory treatment.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2015

[Alemtuzumab: benefits and challenges of new therapy in multiple sclerosis]

ILLÉS Zsolt, TOBIAS Sejbaek, CSÉPÁNY Tünde

[The widening spectrum of MS treatment is partially due to increasing knowledge about the pathogenesis of MS. The humanized monoclonal antibody against CD52, alemtuzumab has been approved in Europe for the treatment of MS, which results in long-term depletion of B and T cells due to complement- and antibody-mediated cytotoxicity. Based on phase 2 and 3 clinical trials, alemtuzumab decreases the risk of sustained neurological deficit and progression compared to high-dose subcutaneous interferon- β1a in patients with active relapsing-remitting MS, either treatment-naïve or with breakthrough disease. We review advantages and benefits of the treatment, discuss safety concerns, and present a case to describe practical issues.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2013

[Can somatosensory evoked potentials predict disease course in early multiple sclerosis patients?]

NAGY Helga, RAJDA Cecília, OROSZ Péter, BENCSIK Krisztina, BENEDEK Krisztina, KÉRI Szabolcs, VÉCSEI László, BENICZKY Sándor

[Background - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune degenerating disease, where myelin degradation as well as axonal loss is present. Purpose - To asses whether recording the middle-latency components of the median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) increases the diagnostic sensitivity in patients with MS, and to investigate whether any of the abnormalities correlates with the severity of the clinical signs and predicts future outcome. Methods - Twenty consecutive MS patients at early onset were included. Median and tibial nerve SEPs were recorded at the time of the referral. Extended Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) were assessed at the time of the referral and after 5-year followup. Results - Recording the middle-latency components increased the sensitivity of the median nerve SEPs from 50% to 75%. The overall sensitivity of the SEPs (i.e. including also tibial nerve SEPs) modestly increased (from 80% to 90%). The amplitude of the cortical N20 potential of the median nerve was inversely correlated to the clinical severity. None of the parameters could predict the future outcome. Conclusions - Our results provide neurophysiological evidence for the role of axonal lesions in the clinical disability of the patients with MS.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2006

[LONG-TERM APPLICATION OF THE MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS FUNCTIONAL COMPOSITE IN DEBRECEN]

MEZEI Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, CSIBA László, CSÉPÁNY Tünde

[Introducion - The multiple sclerosis functional composite (MSFC) has been recommended by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society as a new clinical outcome measure. It is based on measurements in three clinical dimensions: leg function/ambulation (timed 25-foot walk), arm function (9 hole peg test) and cognitive function (paced auditory serial addition test). Scores on component measures are converted to standard scores (Z-scores), that reflect patient performance. This method has not yet been introduced into routine clinical practice. Patients and methods - Since March 2000 over the five years period the MSFC calculation was applied to 17 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (age mean: 37.4±10.8 years, duration of the disease: 5.5±4.9 years, EDSS: 2.7±1.4) seen at the neuroimmunological outpatient clinic to evaluate its usefulness and its correlation with the traditionally applied expanded disability status scale (EDSS). Thirteen patients received immunomodulatory treatment (interferon beta and glatiramer acetate), one patient received immunosuppressant therapy (azathioprine), and there was a patient, to whom developed secondary - progressive phase and we changed the interferon treatment to mitoxantrone. MSFC and EDSS were measured at 3., 6., 9, 12., 18 and 60 months of follow-up. Results - The prospective study confirmed a strong correlation between EDSS and MSFC in multiple sclerosis. The MSFC was more sensitive to clinical changes than EDSS. Our results after 18 months of follow up are already published. After five years arm/hand function and leg function/ambulation were the most sensitive mesures for disease progression. In contrast with the literature we did not experience correlation with cognitive changes. Consequences - We demonstrated strong correlation between MSFC and EDSS after a longer period. MSFC is a simple method, suitable for follow-up of multiple sclerosis patients in everyday clinical practice.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 10, 2005

[Application of the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite in Debrecen]

MEZEI Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, CSIBA László, CSÉPÁNY Tünde

[Introduction - The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) has been recommended by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society as a new clinical outcome measure. It is based on measurements in three clinical dimensions: leg function/ambulation (timed 25-foot walk), arm function (9-hole peg test), and cognitive function (paced auditory serial addition test). Scores on component measures are converted to standard scores (Z-scores) that reflect patient performance. This method has not yet been introduced into routine clinical practice. Patients and method - MSFC calculation was applied to 17 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (age mean: 37.4±10.8 years; duration of the disease: 5.5±4.9 years, EDSS: 2.7±1.4) seen at the neuroimmunological outpatient clinic to evaluate its usefulness and its correlation with the traditionally applied Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and with patient-reported quality of life. Fifteen patients received immunomodulatory treatment (interferon beta and glatiramer acetate). MSFC and EDSS were measured at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 months, and questionnaires on quality of life were filled in by the patients at 0, 6, 12, 18 months of follow- up. Results - The prospective study confirmed a strong correlation between EDSS and MSFC (Spearman correlation test, p=0.03, 0.004, 0.002, 0.004, 0.0008, 0.002; R=-0.54, -0.66, -0.68, -0.65, -0.73, -0.69) in multiple sclerosis. The MSFC was more sensitive to clinical changes than EDSS. The extent of changes on the two scales correlated only after 18 months (p<0.005, R=-0.65). The arm/hand function was the most sensitive measure for disease progression. There was no correlation between the quality of life and either of the two other clinical parameters. Conclusion - MSFC is a simple method, suitable for followup of multiple sclerosis patients in everyday clinical practice.]