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Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

The effects of the level of spinal cord injury on life satisfaction and disability

GULSAH Karatas, NESLIHAN Metli, ELIF Yalcin, RAMAZAN Gündüz, FATIH Karatas, MÜFIT Akyuz

Introduction - Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) may often lead to significant disability in affected individuals and reduce life satisfaction. Herein we aimed to investigate the effects of the level of injury on disability and life satisfaction as well as the relation between life satisfaction and disability. Methods - Patients with at least one-year history of SCI were included. Demographic-clinical data of patients were recorded. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique-Short Form (CHART-SF) was used for quantifying the degree of patients’ disability. Life satisfaction was assessed by the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). Results - Of the 76 patients, 21 (27.6%) were tetraplegic and 55 (72.4%) were paraplegic. SWLS was found to be similar in tetraplegic vs. paraplegic patients (P=0.59), whereas CHART parameters such as physical independence, mobility, occupation, and total CHART value were significantly higher in paraplegic patients (P=0.04, P=0.04, P=0.001 and P=0.01, respectively). Social integration was found similarly high in both groups. There was a positive correlation between elapsed time after the injury and CHART physical independence, occupation and the level of economic sufficiency (P<0.01, P<0.01, P=0.01). Excluding the economic sufficiency (P=0.02), there was not any other association between the rest of CHART parameters and SWLS. Conclusions - According to our findings, although the level of injury seems to be influential on disability, it seems to have no significant effect on life satisfaction. Since the only thing that positively affects life satisfaction is economic sufficiency, more emphasis should be placed on regulations that increase the return to work in patients.

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 20, 2014

[Serum uric acid in primary hypertension: cause or consequence? - Data from SEPHAR II Survey]

DOROBANTU Maria, TAUTU Oana-Florentina, BUZAS Roxana, LIGHEZAN Daniel

[Objectives: To evaluate a possible link between serum uric acid (SUA) levels, arterial stiffness and atherogenic index of plasma on one hand and renal function on the other and to test the role of SUA in the assessment of total cardiovascular risk. Materials and methods: We studied serum uric acid levels (SUA) in 1975 subjects included in SEPHAR II survey. We measured arterial stiffness parameters, calculated atherogenic index of plasma and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) by MDRD and CKD-EPI formulae and assessed total cardiovascular risk according to current ESH-ESC risk stratification chart. Results: The highest SUA values were recorded in subjects with grade III HT and were correlated with increased arterial stiffness and with increased atherogenic index of plasma. The lowest eGRF values, assessed by both MDRD and CKD-EPI, were observed among subjects with hyperuricemia and a significant indirect correlation between SUA and eGFR was evidenced. A proportional correlation between SUA values and total CV risk was also obtained. Conclusions: The study supports SUA implication in the pathogenesis of elevated blood pressure and the role of uric acid as a cardiovascular risk factor, particularly for the development of hypertension and renal disease.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 21, 2006

[LOWER LIMB PAIN OF VASCULAR ORIGIN]

MESKÓ Éva

[The paper describes the characteristics of limb pain associated with acute and chronic arterial occlusions, venous and lymphatic diseases, and underlines the importance of early diagnosis and treatment that may determine the fate of the limb. The type of leg ulcer developing as a complication of an arterial or venous disease can usually be diagnosed by the inspection of the leg. Symptoms that accompany venous thrombosis of the leg often pose serious differential diagnostic problems. The venous sinuses of the leg are of great clinical importance. Thromboses occurring in these are usually recognized late, thus adequate therapy is also started belatedly. Correct diagnosis determines the therapy to be chosen. The diseases of lymphatic vessels often produce tense leg pain by concomitant venous oedema. Peripheral arterial disease has been shown to be an independent risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In view of this, early recognition and adequate therapy of vascular changes in the lower limb may prevent its progression to a life-threatening vascular disease affecting the whole body. In humans, individual vascular diseases develop in various times and locations, but with a similar pathomechanism. Based on this rule, cerebral, cardiac and peripheral localisation of the vascular disease must be searched for in each patient. High professional standards and a uniform diagnostic thinking are key elements of success. This is promoted in the paper by a flow-chart indicating the steps to be taken by the GP in the management and care of patients with vascular disease.]