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Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 10, 2018

[Medical use of marihuana especially in oncology]

VÉGH Éva

[The medical use of marijuana has gained a considerable attention among wide range of cancer patients lately in Hungary. Consequently, oncologist sare facing questions related to cannabinoids more and more in their clinical practice. This article aims to clarify some basic concepts and to give a brief introduction on the current international and national legislation on their accessibility. Numerous publications have dealt with the application of marijuana in various indications. Among the tumour related indications, the concerned studies mainly refer to chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, chronic pain, sleep disorders, anorexia and cachexia. The article also to uches upon on knowledge connected to the causal treatment of malignant tumours, which are currently limited to glioblastoma. Information on the carcinogenic potential of cannabis and information on the popularity and attitudes of American oncologists can be found in this article. This paper gives a literature review in the above mentioned themes.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2010

[Frontotemporal dementia, Pick’s disease]

ANDREW Kertesz

[A significant expansion of knowledge in the last few years, especially in the molecular biology of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is summarized. This condition, formerly known as Pick’s disease and considered rare, is estimated to be 12-15% of all dementias and 30-50% early onset ones. The clinical picture is protean, mainly a behavioural and language impairment, but the extrapyramidal syndromes of CBD and PSP also belong. These seemingly different presentations converge, as one or other areas in the brain are affected. Less than half of the cases are tauopathies, the majority has been discovered to have a TDP-43 and most recently a FUS proteinopathy, shared with ALS, opening potential opportunities for pharmacological approaches to treatment. Tau and progranulin mutations on Ch-17 and some others, point to molecular mechanisms. A glossary is provided to navigate the complex terminology.]

Clinical Neuroscience

FEBRUARY 10, 2004

[A novel analgesic made from cannabis]

SZENDREI Kálmán

[Bayer AG has recently announced that it acquired exclusive rights for the marketing of GW Pharmaceuticals´ new medicine Sativex® in Europe and in other regions. Sativex is a sublingual spray on Cannabis extract basis, and is equipped with an electronic tool to facilitate accurate dosing and to prevent misuses. It is standardized for the THC and CBD. The new analgesic is proposed for the treatment of muscle spasticity and pains accompanying multiple sclerosis and as an efficient analgetic for neurogenic pain not responding well to opioids and to other therapies available. The entirely new mechanism of action through the recently discovered cannabinoid receptor system may offer a real therapeutic potential to the drug. Although the Government of Netherlands has authorized the sale of pharmaceutical grade Cannabis herb by pharmacies in the Netherlands, the availability on the pharmaceutical market of the registered preparation may render requests for the authorization of the smoking of Cannabis herb (marihuana) by individuals suffering of multiple sclerosis, neurogenic pain, AIDS wasting syndrome unnecessary. Nevertheless, the ”old chameleon” plant Cannabis appears to gradually regain its previous status in mainstream therapy and pharmacy. As long as the plant Cannabis and its products continue to be classified as narcotic drugs, medical use of the new preparation will need close supervision.]

Clinical Neuroscience

AUGUST 20, 2002

[Parkinson's syndrome and cognitive disorders]

SZIRMAI Imre, KOVÁCS Tibor

[The cognitive (executive) ability of patients with Parkinson’s-disease (PD) deteriorates gradually during the progression of the disease. Fluency of speech, word finding, working memory, ability to plan the future and flexibility decline. Cognitive disturbance was found to be proportional with the speech, posture, gait and balance problems and can not be influenced by L-dopa substitution. Apart the dorsal and ventral mesolimbic dopaminergic systems the coerulo-cortical noradrenergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems are also impaired in PD. Subcortical dementia in PD can also be explained by the functional dysability of dorsolateral and anterior cingular circuits. Attention deficit can be explained by the dopamine depletion of cingular cortex. Cortical Lewy bodies, neurofibrillary tangles, neurit plaques and additional vascular pathology should also play a role in cognitive impairment of PD. In several systemic degenerative diseases associating with Parkinson’s syndrome (PS) ie. progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), multiple system atrophy (MSA) dementia can be detected with various severity, therefore the question arises concerning the correlation between cognitive disability and PS. Parkinson syndrome can also develop in frontotemporal dementias (FTD), Alzheimer’s disease and cortical Lewy body disease (CLBD) but no correlation exists between motor disability and severity of dementia. In CLBD dementia can be the initial symptom in 18% of cases but PS can also preceedes the dementia. In PSP profound depletion of other monoaminergic neurotransmitter system was also reported. In FTDs associated with PS degeneration of substantia nigra, locus coeruleus and basal nucleus of Meynert has been reported with increased number of neurofibrillary tangles. In patients with vascular PS (VP) there is generally no tremor and rigidity, but pseudobulbar palsy, dementia, gate disturbance, incontinency appeares; L-dopa treatment is generally ineffective. In VP no cellular loss can be found within the substantia nigra, but leukoaraiosis, lacunae in the white matter and basal ganglia are commonly demonstrated.]