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Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2013

[Benign-onset acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: A report on two cases]

DEGIRMENCI Eylem, ERDOGAN Cagdas, OGUZHANOGLU Attila, BIR Sinan Levent

[The signs and symptoms of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis are heterogeneous and dependent on the location and severity of the inflammatory process. The meningoencephalitic presentation may include meningism, impaired consciousness (occasionally leading to coma), seizures and confusion, or behavioral disturbances. Multifocal neurological features include a combination of optic neuritis, visual field defects, cranial neuropathy, sensorimotor impairment, ataxia, aphasia, and involuntary movements. One definition of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is “an initial clinical event with a presumed inflammatory and demyelinating cause, with acute or sub-acute onset affecting multifocal areas of the central nervous system”. Patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis frequently suffer from seizures, disturbances of consciousness, fever, and headaches, and occasionally there are focal signs and symptoms. Here, we report on two cases who presented with different symptoms, but the clinical findings that the patients showed were benign.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 22, 2009

[Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in childhood]

LIPTAI Zoltán, ÚJHELYI Enikő, MIHÁLY Ilona, RUDAS Gábor, BARSI Péter

[Background and purpose - Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a rare inflammatory demyelinating disorder often preceded by infection or vaccination. The purpose of the study was the systematic analysis of clinical, radiological and microbiological profiles of children treated at Szent László Hospital, and the comparison of findings with literature data. Methods - Demographic, infectological, clinical, radiological, laboratory and virological data of patients treated and followed-up between 1-Jan-1998 and 30-June-2008 were reviewed and analysed. Results - 19 children met diagnostic criteria. Their mean age was 6.8 years. A prodromal illness - mostly febrile viral infection, upper respiratory infection or chickenpox - preceded neurological symptoms in 17 patients. All had polysymptomatic encephalopathy, 2 children had spinal symptoms. The cerebrospinal fluid was abnormal in all but one. A viral etiology was definite in 7 and probable in 8 cases. MRI disclosed white matter changes in 18, cortical and deep gray matter in 16, cerebellar in 6, brain stem in 14 and spinal cord changes in 2 cases. Repeat MRI performed mean 4 months later showed complete resolution in 6 and partial resolution in 11 patients. 13 patients received high-dose methylprednisolone, 2 of whom were also treated with plasma exchange and 1 with immunoglobulin. 9 children required mechanical ventilation. 2 patients died, 10 recovered without and 7 with sequelae. 2 patients developed further demyelinating events: multiple sclerosis and multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis, respectively. Conclusion - Clinical, radiological and follow-up results were similar to those published in literature however, triggering viruses were identified in a larger proportion of cases.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 25, 2009

[MR imaging of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis in children. A review (in English language)]

PATAY Zoltán

[Inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) are relatively rare in children, but their relevance to public health is considerable due to frequent and significant long term morbidity and even mortality. As in adults, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and multiple sclerosis (MS) and their variants are the most common entities in this group of pathologies in the pediatric patient population. Recent efforts have focused on establishing standardized diagnostic criteria schemes to facilitate the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of these diseases, however especially with multiple sclerosis those have not been fully validated yet for disease occurring in children. In recent decades the role of MRI has been constantly increasing in the diagnostic work-up of suspected inflammatory diseases of the CNS as well as in the follow-up of patients with confirmed disease. Currently, MRI is the first-line diagnostic imaging modality in ADEM and MS and is fully integrated in the most widely used diagnostic criteria schemes, but it has a key role in clinical therapeutic research trials as well. This paper provides an update on the current concepts and strategies of MRI in inflammatory diseases of the CNS, as well as a review of the imaging semiology of the various disease entities and variants with emphasis on clinical and imaging particularities relevant to the pediatric patient population.]