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Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 21, 2020

[30 year history of surgery and the surgeon’s future ]

KUPCSULIK Péter

[During the past 3 decades, laparoscopic surgery has launched a revolution in operative medicine. The German gynaecologist Kurt Semm transformed the diagnostic laparoscopy for therapeutic procedure, as he performed the first laparoscopic ap­pen­dectomy. The surgeon Erich Mühe contributed with laparoscopic cholecystectomy to the set of surgical instruments. All over the world, a wide spectrum of laparoscopic procedures has been app­lied. Several laparoscopic procedures are now preferred over open approaches. Morbid obesity is associated with significant comorbidity and mortality. In­suffi­ciency of dietary measures lead to development of surgical interventions that resulted in unexpected excellent outcomes. “Metabolic surgery” was born. New methods and rising market of socio-medical requirements inspired progress in plastic surgery. Thanks to innovations in technology, reconstructive breast surgery has opened new ways. In the 1990s the prototype of “mas­ter–slave” robot controlled by a surgeon was constructed. Future of robotic surgery depends on cost reduc­tion, development of new technologies and creating the best applications. Coo­pe­ra­tion with partner medical specialities is essential for further development in surgery. Despite of obvious impact of new technologies the surgeon's way of thinking, personal qualities decision-making and professional knowledge remain cru­cial for further evolution. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

NOVEMBER 04, 2020

[The ACE2-Ang(1-7)-Mas axis as a new option for lowering blood pressure]

KÉKES Ede

[The ACE2-Ang(1-7)-Mas axis counterbalances the ACE/Ang II-AT1R axis in our body in order to maintain normal homeostasis. During the Covid-19 pandemic, this protective system came to the fore again and its beneficial effects on the cardiovascular-metabolic system, including the significant antihypertensive effect, are being clarified. In our brief summary, we analyze the essential aspects of this research.]

Hypertension and nephrology

NOVEMBER 04, 2020

[Hypertension and Covid-19 - part II.]

SZÉKÁCS Béla, KÉKES Ede, NAGY Judit, KOVÁCS Tibor

[The authors review those components and mechanisms in the two major regulatory systems of circulation and inflammation-coagulation whose internal balance and interactions are pathologically altered during SARS-CoV-2 infection, thereby enhancing lung and systemic inflammation threatening to enter into severe clinical condition. They examine the question of how – in addition to potentially promoting the coronavirus cellular entry and penetration – the RAS inhibitor therapy affects these changes and whether can be supposed difference between the anti-/pro-inflammatory influence of ACEi and ARB treatment of old hypertensive patients representing a remarkably high proportion of victims in COVID-19 epidemic. The paper is focussing to the pathomechanical background of inflammation beyond the direct immunological response to the infection: to the significance of immunological alterations characterizing old hypertensive patients also in basic condition, and to the key components as angiotensin II, ACE2, angiotensin1-7, bradykinin, ARB and ACEi. In conclusion a consideration on optimal point of action is offered in RASi treated and SARS-CoV-2 infected (old) hypertensive patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 24, 2020

[Covid-19 and the kidney]

PATÓ Éva, DEÁK György

[Covid-19 pandemy has emerged from Wuhan, China in December 2019. The infection affects not only the lung but other organs such as the kidney, as well. The relation between Covid-19 infection and the kidney is bidirectional. On one hand, Covid-19 infection may cause kidney damage in 50-75% of the cases resulting in proteinuria, haematuria and acute kidney injury (AKI). The etiology of AKI is multifactorial. Main pathogenic mechanisms are direct proximal tubular cell damage, sepsis-related haemodinamic derangement, citokine storm and hypercoagulability. The virus enters proximal tubular cells and podocytes via the ACE2 receptor followed by multiplication in the lysomes and consequential cell lesion. Histopathology shows acute tubular necrosis and acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. AKI is a strong predictor of mortality in critically ill patients. On the other hand, the risk of Covid-19 infection and mortality is substantially increased in patients with chronic kidney disease – especially in those with a kidney transplant or on dialysis – due to their immunocompromised status. Among haemodialysis patients, infection may spread very easily due to the possibility of getting contacted in the ambulance car or at the dialysis unit. The mortality rate of patients on renal replacement therapy with Covid-19 infection is 20-35%. In order to avoid mass infection it is obligatory to employ preventive measures and implement restricions along with (cohors) isolation of infected patients. In Hungary, every dialysis or kidney transplant patient with Covid-19 infection should be admitted to dedicated Covid-19 wards.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

Long term follow-up of lesional and non-lesional patients with electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep

HEGYI Márta, SIEGLER Zsuzsa, FOGARASI András, BARSI Péter, HALÁSZ Péter

Objectives – A retrospective study has been done at the Bethesda Children’s Hospital Epilepsy Center with those patients whose EEG records fulfilled in one or more records the criteria of electrical status epilepticus in slow wave sleep (ESES) pattern, occupying at least 75% of NREM sleep with bilateral discharges, and had detailed disease history and long term follow-up data, between 2000 and 2012. Patients and methods – Thirty-three patients (mean 11.1±4.2 years of age) were studied by 171 sleep EEG records. Sleep was recorded after sleep deprivation or during spontaneous sleep at least for one hour length of NREM. From the 492 EEGs, 171 sleep records were performed (average five/patient). Average follow-up time was 7.5 years. Eighty-two ESES records have been analyzed in 15 non-lesional and 18 lesional (11 with dysgenetic and seven with perinatal - asphyxic or vascular origin) patients. Variability of seizure types, seizure frequency and frequency of status epilepticus was higher in the lesional group. Impairment of the cognitive functions was moderate and partial in the non-lesional, while severely damaged in the lesional group. Results – EEG records of 29 patients showed unihemispherial spike fields with a perpendicular axis (in anterior, medial and posterior variants) to the Sylvian fissure, regardless their lesional or non-lesional origin. Only three (1one non-lesional and two lesional) patients had bilateral synchronous spike-wave discharges with bilateral symmetric frontocentral spike fields. The individual discharges of the sleep EEG pattern were very similar to the awake interictal records except their extension in time and field, their increased number, amplitude, and continuity of them and furthermore in the increased trans-hemispheral propagation and their synchronity. Conclusions – Assumed circuits involved in the pathomechanism of discharges during NREM sleep in ESES are discussed based on our findings.

Lege Artis Medicinae

APRIL 18, 2020

[What is worth to know about COVID-19 for (not only) a cardiologist]

HEPP Tamás, CSÉKE Balázs, BENCZÚR Béla

[SARS-CoV-2 virus infection sprang from Wuhan the capital of the Chinese Hubei province, at the end of 2019 and caused a worldwide pandemic with 1.5 million confirmed cases and claimed almost 100 000 victims until the beginning of April, 2020. First analyses of Chinese COVID-patients confirmed that diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases were highly prevalent among SARS-CoV2 infected patients, and might be associated with poor outcome. As previously shown for SARS-CoV-1, SARS-CoV-2 similarly utilizes ACE2 as receptor for viral alveolar cell entry. A suspicion has arisen that the widely used ACE-inhibitor/ARB therapy could be potentially harmful for patients suffering from COVID-19 infection as these agents upregulate the ACE2-expressions. From the other point RAAS-blockade might be beneficial due to fact that ACE2 counters the deleterious effects of Angiotensin II. Authors provide a comprehensive over­view of the most recent literature and summarize the link between COVID-19 and car­diovascular disease. It is important to em­phasize that there are no available hu­man evidences confirming if the RAAS-in­hi­bitor therapy were harmful or helpful in pa­tients suffering from COVID-19.]

Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 10, 2018

[Advancing therapies in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer]

GIULIA Baciarello, MARCO Gicci, KARIM Fizazi

[Introduction: Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer world wide and is the most frequently detected cancer in the European Union in men over 50 years of age. Androgen deprivation therapy remains the corner stone of treatment for recurrent or metastatic disease. Unfortunately, nearly all patients will develop resistance to androgen blockade leading to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Over the last 10 years, new treatment shaved ramatically improved overall survival of men with mCRPC. Current therapies are basedon AR-axis inhibitors and taxane-based chemotherapies, aswell as radiopharmaceuticals and Sipuleucel T. Areas covered: The authors provide a review of the current fi eld of systemic therapy in metastatic CRPC. This is followed by an in-depth analysis of recent developments in treatment, and the biological rationale behind these therapies. Expert opinion: Since several trials with docetaxel or novel hormonal agents showed improvement in overall survival in metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer, aswell as in non-metastatic castrationresistant patients, it is expected that a growing subgroup of patients will be expose dearlierto chemotherapy and to AR targeted agents. It becomes then fundamental to fi nd novel strategies to over come drug resistance and further improve survival.]

Clinical Oncology

MAY 10, 2018

[Immunotherapy of lungcancer – an update]

OSTOROS Gyula

[Ten years ago the median survival of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was less than one year. In the case of SCLC the situation did not change. There are revolutionary new possibilities in the treatment of NSCLC (histology based cytotoxic chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapy etc.). Unfortunately there is no signifi cant development in treatment strategy of SCLC in the last 30 years. Nowadays in NSCLC immune check point inhibitor therapy is a novel treatment method in the clinical praxis as well. The integration of the PD axis and the CTLA4 inhibitors in the complex therapy of the management of NSCLC is a new challenge. The pembrolizumab monotherapy in fi rst line setting is a new standard of care with high PDL1 expression. In second line setting the pembrolizumab, nivolumab and atezolizumab widely used in clinical praxis as well. In locally advanced disease of NSCLC after radiochemotherapy the durvalumab maintenance monotherapy showed a signifi cant progression free survival benefi t, comparing to placebo. We have got new treatment possibilities in the treatment of SCLC as well. The results of clinical trials with antibody conjugate therapy are promising. The nivolumab monotherapy and the combination treatment of nivolumab + ipilimumab gave promising results as well. In the treatment of SCLC and NSCLC there is a need for biomarker selected therapy (tumor mutational burden [TMB], DLL3, cMyc etc.). Based on the new positive results of the clinical trials there is a possibility to transform lung cancer from a subacute disease to a chronic illness.]

Clinical Oncology

SEPTEMBER 05, 2015

[Up-to-date treatment of head and neck cancers]

PACZONA Róbert, CSENKI Melinda, HIDEGHÉTY Katalin

[The head and neck squamous cell cancer is often detected at an advanced stage, resulting in dismal prognosis despite the relevant developments of the oncotherapy in the last decades. The introduction of new techniques, new drugs and combinations though improves the survival for certain subgroups of patients, meanwhile the organ-function preservation and side effects reduction approaches lead to improved quality of life. The preventive-supportive care prior and during the therapy (dental care, nutrition, toxicity management) and the complex rehabilitation has paramount importance. MRI and 18FDG PET-CT and the advanced methods of molecular pathology became part of the diagnostic work up. The selection of the therapy based on the tumor characteristics, HPV detection, on the patient’s condition and wishes, as well as on multi-disciplinary team decision based on the available technical options. Early stage tumors can be successfully treated either by surgery alone or by radiation therapy. For locally advanced cases concomittant chemo-radiotherapy stays in the axis of the complex management using advanced radiation technique (IGRT-adaptive- IMRT) with cisplatin (or if contraindicated with cetuximab), which could be complemented by induction chemotherapy and/or surgery. Several new approaches are currently being tested in clinical studies after establishment of cisplatine-cetuximab treatment for recurrent/metastatic tumors. In the future, detection of molecular processes and driver mutations could result in development of more effective targeted anti-tumor agents, and individual molecular tumor profi le guided therapy, including the various forms and combinations with emerging immunotherapy.]