Search results

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2021

The effects of 30 Hz, 50 Hz AND 100 Hz continuous theta burst stimulation via transcranial magnetic stimulation on the electrophysiological parameters in healthy individuals

OZDEMIR Zeynep, ACAR Erkan, SOYSAL Aysun

Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a non-invasive procedure that uses robust magnetic fields to create an electrical current in the cerebral cortex. Dual stimulation consists of administering subthre­shold conditioning stimulation (CS), then suprathreshold test stimulation (TS). When the interstimulus interval (ISI) is 1-6 msec, the motor evoked potential (MEP) decreases in amplitude; this decrease is termed “short interval intracortical inhibition” (SICI); when the ISI is 7-30 msec, an increase in MEP amplitude occurs, termed “short interval intracortical facilitation” (SICF). Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS), often applied at a frequency of 50 Hz, has been shown to decrease cortical excitability. The primary objective is to determine which duration of cTBS achieves better inhibition or excitation. The secondary objective is to compare 50 Hz cTBS to 30 Hz and 100 Hz cTBS. The resting motor threshold (rMT), MEP, SICI, and SICF were studied in 30 healthy volunteers. CS and TS were administered at 80%-120% and 70%-140% of rMT at 2 and 3-millisecond (msec) intervals for SICI, and 10- and 12-msec intervals for SICF. Ten individuals in each group received 30, 50, or 100 Hz, followed by administration of rMT, MT-MEP, SICI, SICF immediately and at 30 minutes. Greater inhibition was achieved with 3 msec than 2 msec in SICI, whereas better facilitation occurred at 12 msec than 10 msec in SICF. At 30 Hz, cTBS augmented inhibition and suppressed facilitation, while 50 Hz yielded less inhibition and greater inter-individual variability. At 100 Hz, cTBS provided slight facilitation in MEP amplitudes with less interindividual variability. SICI and SICF did not differ significantly between 50 Hz and 100 Hz cTBS. Our results suggest that performing SICI and SICF for 3 and 12 msec, respectively, and CS and TS at 80%-120% of rMT, demonstrate safer inhibition and facilitation. Recently, TBS has been used in the treatment of various neurological diseases, and we recommend preferentially 30 Hz over 50 Hz cTBS for better inhibition with greater safety and less inter-individual variability.

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2020

[Recurrent inhibition during Jendrassik maneuver]

LUKÁCS Miklós

[Objective – Conflicting theoretical models exist regarding the mechanism related to the ability of the Jendrassik maneuver to reinforce reflex parameters. Our objective was to investigate if vigorous handgrip would induce changes in recurrent inhibition of soleus motoneurons. Method – Soleus H reflex was evoked by stimulating the tibial nerve at rest and during bilateral vigorous handgrip, alternating single (H1) and paired stimulation (H2). At paired stimulation we used interstimulus intervals of 10, 15, 20 and 25 ms and supramaximal test stimulus. H1- and H2-wave amplitudes were expressed as percentage of maximal M-wave amplitude. Conditioned H2 wave maximal (H2max) and minimal (H2) amplitudes evoked at rest and expressed as a percentage of the unconditioned H1max amplitude were compared with the corresponding values obtained during handgrip by means of paired Student test and Bonferroni correction. Subjects – At the study participated 28 healthy volunteers. Results – The H1max/Mmax × 100 values obtained during handgrip (37.5±10.1) were significantly higher than those obtained at rest (27.1±7.4). The H2max/H1max × 100-va­lues obtained at paired stimulation were significantly higher during handgrip than at rest, while no significant diffe­rence was found between the H2/H1max × 100-values obtained during handgrip and at rest respectively. Discussion – The H2max/H1max is determined by both the excitability of the motoneurons and the recurrent inhibition elicited by the conditioning stimulus, while H2/H1max indicates only the level of recurrent inhibition. According to our results the Renshaw cells retain their inhibitory effect on the soleus alpha motoneurons during remote muscle contraction. Conclusion – Soleus H reflex enhancement during Jendrassik maneuver is not due to decrease of recurrent inhibition. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 24, 2020

[Systolic and diastolic blood pressure by height, BMI, gender and age between 14 and 18 years of age]

SZABÓ László, SCHEURING Noémi, GÁCSI Erika, KORMOS-TASI Judit

[The aim of the screening program was to investigate blood pressure levels in different ages according to obesity. Blood pressure, heart rate, body composition, bodyweight, height and BMI were assessed. 2202 adolescent (1326 girls, 876 boys) participated in the screening program. The mean systolic blood pressure of all screened adolescents was 126.34 ± 12.55 mmHg. Boy/girl values were 131.87 ± 13.59/117.49 ± 5.69 mmHg, p < 0.001. The mean diastolic blood pressure of all screened adolescents was 71.86 ± 8.74 mmHg. Boy/girl values were 72.61 ± 9.17/66.69 ± 5.04 mmHg, p < 0.001. The 50%, 90%, 95%, and 99% thresholds and cases for systolic, diastolic blood pressure, and the BMI and BodyFluid thresholds, detailed for 14–18 year olds, girls and boys, are tabulated. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was over 99% in 12 girls (14- year-olds), 39 (15), 42 (16), 33 (17), 5 (18) to height. SBP was over 99% in 17 boys (14-year-olds), 73 (15), 100 (16), 33 (17), 5 (18) to height. It is emphasized that systolic blood pressure (SBP) is > 99% in 12 girls (14 years), 39 (15), 42 (16), 33 (17), 5 (18) to body height. SBP > 99% for 17 boys (14 years), 73 (15), 100 (16), 33 (17), 5 (18) to body height. Elevated diastolic values were associated with elevated systolic values, but less occurred. The percentage of high blood pressure was more frequent among boys and girls who were in the overweight group (58.6% and 18.6%). Normal blood pressure is higher in overweight and obese adolescents and is a significant risk factor for developing high blood pressure in young adulthood.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2019

Additional value of tau protein measurement in the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

CSEH Katalin Edina, VERES Gábor, DANICS Krisztina, SZALÁRDY Levente, NÁNÁSI Nikolett, KLIVÉNYI Péter, VÉCSEI László, ZÁDORI Dénes

Since the definite diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) can currently only be provided by autopsy, there is a special need for fine diagnostic tools in live patients to achieve accurate diagnosis as early as possible. The aim of this study was to perform a preliminary retrospective analysis on the utility of the measurement of total Tau (tTau) and some other biomarkers from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with rapidly progressive dementia in the diagnostic work up of CJD. Beside the assessment of relevant clinical data and the findings of electroencephalography and brain magnetic resonance imaging, the presence of 14-3-3 protein and the levels of tTau were determined by Western blot technique and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay from the CSF of 19 patients diagnosed with rapidly progressive dementia between the period of 2004-2017 at the Department of Neurology, University of Szeged. This preliminary study provided 100% sensitivity for 14-3-3, and interestingly, only 40% specificity to support the clinical diagnosis of CJD. Regarding tTau, the sensitivity values were calculated to be 100% or 83%, whereas the specificity values were 71% or 86%, depending on the applied cut-off levels. The poor specificity of 14-3-3 is not in line with literature data and may be the result of the small number of patients in the cohort with non-prion disease, predominantly consisting of disorders with considerable tissue damage, whereas tTau presented good sensitivity and specificity values. The combined application of these and novel chemical biomarkers may increase both sensitivity and specificity to a desired level.

Lege Artis Medicinae

OCTOBER 20, 2018

[Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 75 or 100 mg? ]

KIS János Tibor, ZSIGMOND Kálmán

[The acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is one of the oldest and most widely used drugs in the world. Currently, it is the most commonly used for the treatment and prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Today, there has been consensus that the risk of ASA’s side effects in primary prevention is greater than the expected benefits. However, it maintains its leading role in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. There is also a consensus that small doses are recommended for preventive purposes, but there is no agreement whether it should be 75 or 81 or 100 mg. The authors summa­rize the publications published in this topic. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 21, 2020

[The metamizole]

DUMELE Andreea

[Metamizole in use for almost 100 years, is reviving in our days since it has proved its efficiency and gained popularity during the past years. By its special triple effect (analgesic, antipyretic and spasmolytic) it has a wide range of indications. Among the non-opioid analgesics it is one of the most powerful painkillers. Metamizole is a prodrug, since it transforms into active metabolites within the human body. Its action mechanism is complex, not completely understood so far. Contrasted to classic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, metamizole has low anti-inflammatory effect. Its severe, but very rare side effect – i.e. the agranulocytosis - hindered its administration for years and even today it is under intense discussions. Based on international studies, it proved to be a well tolerable, safe medication. Its side effect profile differs from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, thus in NSAID contraindications it provides an excellent alternative. Its good water solubility makes metamizole suitable for both oral and parenteral administration. For its efficiency and good safety profile, metamizole has been correctly reintroduced to the supply of over-the-counter painkillers in our country.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 21, 2020

[Family therapy encounters with the philosophy of dialogue – Ivan Boszormenyi-Nagy was born 100 years ago]

KELEMEN Gábor

[This paper deals with the significant therapeutic innovations of Ivan Boszormenyi-Nagy in the light of their philosophical foundations. The greatest Hungarian family therapist, Boszormenyi-Nagy’s work evolved in America. The author, referring to Bo­szormenyi-Nagy’s career, presents the phi­losophical roots of his theory. Par­ti­cu­larly Martin Buber’s philosophy of dialogue including the concept of existential guilt, violanting the justice of human order. Bo­szormenyi-Nagy, who elaborated contextual therapy and its main dimension, the ethics of fairness, assumes that family life, ethical questions of truthworthiness and res­ponsibity for the consequences of our actions are inseparable. Contextual therapy was groundbreaking in its time with the therapeutic attitude and method of multidirected partiality, and is relevant even today. This guideline, requiring to include all people with their humanity, solidarity and accountability who are potentially affected remains sound clinical unifying principle of comprehensive psychotherapeutic practice. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

[Economic features of rewarding physicians – changing for fair incomes in Hungary ]

BALÁZS Péter

[Since ages, rewarding physicians was a crucial problem. Among true professionals (priests, legal experts, physicians and teachers) only medical doctors are necessarily working in physical terms, which generates permanent uncertainty about their remuneration. Old Age manual services (surgery, obstetrics) were paid by artisans’ standards while patients of faith-healing (by priest-doctors) presented religious offers according to their capacities. Hippocrates’ business ethics transformed this pattern as price elasticity for profane providers. During the Medieval Ages, governments issued also for physicians fee schedules or in some countries like Hungary they agreed free on remuneration with their patients. Thus, Hungary’s physicians experienced 1891 the implementation of the Bismarck type social health insurance as a real shock-wave generated by the depressed fee proposals. After the first hit, during the following 100 years Hungary committed all possible financial failures down to the fall of Communism in 1989. After the age (1949–1989) of socialism in the health care, general practitioners returned to the self-employed business however under heavy custody of a single payer public fi­nan­cing. Specialist in out and in-patient care (if they used this opportunity) were “li­cenced” for earning money on the quasi pri­vate market of the under-the-table informal business. Actually, only the private dentistry preserved its legal free market share and by the cross-border “dental-tourism” Hungary joined also the competitive international dental market. All other specialists demonstrate income discontent by requiring higher wages, working abroad or fuelling debates on accepting informal payments of “thankful” patients. Contrasted to dentistry, there are actually no economic standards to ponder physicians’ income expectations and compare them with purchasing power of public and private financing. This study shows first the historic evidence of the relevant golden standard and its continuity un-der the present circumstances however supressed for political reasons. It would be able to settle debates about the public employees’ wages of doctors caught out of the thin air. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 01, 2020

[Suicide endangering elderly people: risk factors, prevention and care]

BARACZKA Krisztina

[According to the data of the Hungarian Central Statistical Office (HCSO), the Hungarian citizens aged over 65 represented in 2001 11.8%, 2011 13.2% and 2019 19.3% of the total population. Providing services for aging (>60 years), aged (>75 years), very old (>90 years) and Matusalem (>100 years) individuals burdens heavily the health system and the socio-economic sector. Maintaining these people’s physical and mental health and self-perceived well-being is a pre-eminently important task. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) statistics based on data providing countries, the number of suicides committed in the population aged 60-79 has risen approximately by 21% between 1987 and 2006. The suicide rate in Hungary has decreased steadily and significantly since 1980 (4809 in 1980, 1656 in 2018, i.e. a decrease of 66%). Thus since 2018, Hungary is not among the top three countries in Europe and the top 15 in the world. However, the number of completed suicides and suicide attempts remains high and shows rising tendency in the elderly. Preventing suicide, exploring the risk factors and caring patients after attempted suicide we need to analyse thoroughly and disseminate widely the results of the recent researches. In this study, we re­viewed international and domestic literature data to find answers primarily to prevention issues. ]