Lege Artis Medicinae

[What does the „whole”-ness of patients with diabetes mellitus mean?]

VÁLYI Péter

APRIL 20, 2016

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2016;26(04)

[Diabetes mellitus is a chronic, progressive disease, characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose, can lead to many complications and can increase the overall risk of early disability and dying prematurely. The newest guidelines on management of patients with diabetes mellitus give a full description of diagnostic criteria, prevention, lifestyle and pharmacological treatment, complications, age-related characteristics. However, in everyday care of patients with diabetes mellitus little attention is paid to severity of anatomical and functional impairment related to disease, how and in what extent those limit everyday activities, restricts filling the social role, the importance of interrelationship of a human being and environment, to personal factors. The aims of this publication is: to present how diabetes mellitus influences the entirety, the “whole”-ness of a human; to show tools of objective estimation of impairments and changes of functionality; to call attention to importance of development of residual abilities, of shaping supportive environment, of assessment of needs, of positive influences of personal characteristics; to demonstrate how all these measures improve quality of life and compliance of patient with diabetes mellitus. The holistic approach of “human’s whole-ness” can contribute to success of preventive, curative and rehabilitative measures in patients with diabetes mellitus.]

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