Lege Artis Medicinae

[The memory of Pal Gyulay]

KAPRONCZAY Károly

MAY 20, 2001

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2001;11(05)

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[Molecular morphological methods in laboratory medicine]

BALÁZS Margit, ÁDÁNY Róza

[Today, the increasing technical arsenal of molecular morphology has not only methodological importance, but also a revolutionary role in diagnostic laboratory medicine. Techniques previously used only in basic research have become widespread in routine diagnostics by now. The development of methodology for detection of genetic alterations has enabled laboratory tests not only to define disease associated pathobiochemical alterations, but also to identify the genetic background of diseases as well. Evolution of these methods caused qualitative changes not only in detection of disease specific alterations, but also in revealing increased individual susceptibility (sometimes at population level) indicating genetic predisposition to the disease. Recently, the classical methodology based on genetic microscopic morphology has been gradually supplemented or even replaced by different in situ hybridization techniques in many laboratories. Using these techniques chromosomal alterations in cells and tissues (including tumor cells) can be detected within one day (or maximum 1-2 days) without in vitro manipulation of cells. These improved techniques allow us to monitor chromosomal changes after the treatment of genetic diseases or define these alterations induced by environmental exposures.]

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