Lege Artis Medicinae

[RARE ASSOCIATION OF HODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA, GRAVES’ DISEASE AND MYASTHENIA GRAVIS]

RESS Zsuzsa, MEKKEL Gabriella, ILLÉS Árpád

APRIL 20, 2005

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2005;15(04)

[INTRODUCTION - In some cases other diseases associate with Hodgkin’s lymphoma, when it is diagnosed or relapses. Association of Hodgkin’s lymphoma with Graves’ disease and myasthenia gravis in one patient has not yet been reported in the literature. CASE REPORT - We report on a young female patient who had suffered from Hodgkin’s lymphoma since 1996. He had received polychemotherapy and mantle field irradiation previously. After treatment, complete remission was stated in 2000. Then she was treated because of Graves’ disease. In 2001 she complained of dysarthria, dysphagia, ptosis and diplopia. Thorough examinations proved myasthenia gravis. Considering the progression plasmapheresis was administered several times with cyclophosphamide and intravenous immunglobulin, besides conservative therapy. Recently she is euthyroid state, Hodgkin’s disease is in remission and her only complaint is dysarthria. CONCLUSION - The importance of this case on one hand is the rare association of these diseases, on the other is that Graves’ disease and myasthenia gravis occurred during in the remission of Hodgkin’s disease. Causal relation is not unambiguous but the role of disturbed immunregulation caused by Hodgkin’s lymphoma or the irradiation of the neck region can also contribute to it. The pure coincidental occurrence of Hodgkin lymphoma, Graves’ disease and myasthenia gravis is highly unlikely.]

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