Lege Artis Medicinae

[Psychiatry or an Alternative?]

ZÖRGŐ Szilvia

JANUARY 20, 2018

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2018;28(01-02)

[Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasing in the plural healthcare market of our globalized world. Aside from a healthcare market, we may also speak of a “worldview market” in which various concepts of health and illness compete with each other and in which patients strive to orient themselves. In a milieu of prolific information production, “facts” are increasingly under subjective judgement. Thus topics such as mechanisms underlying the appraisal of information sources regarding healthcare, as well as processes behind decision-making and building or losing trust have risen in significance. Orientation in the sea of information is largely determined by global trends, societal-level phenomena, as well as cultural dispositions or preferences that take root in the individual; these factors also influence therapy choice. Such preferences include that of “holism” and the “natural”, as well as a desire for initiation; these dispositions play a vital role in information processing and decision-making, for example when the patient is weighing whether to turn to a psychiatrist or a CAM specialist. ]

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