Lege Artis Medicinae

[Pantaleon the doctor, patron saint of doctors]

BERECZKI Zoltán

JUNE 30, 1992

Lege Artis Medicinae - 1992;2(06)

[The spread of the cult of Pantaleon in the world; Traditions in Hungary; Places bearing the name of Pantaleon; The monastery of Saint Pantaleon; Memories of Pentele]

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