Lege Artis Medicinae

[Memory of an Angel The Life of Alban Berg]

MALINA János

NOVEMBER 20, 2005

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2005;15(11)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[Effects of tiotropium on lung hyperinflation, dyspnoe and exercise tolerance in COPD]

NAGY László Béla

Lege Artis Medicinae

[MANAGEMENT OF LIFE-THREATENING ENDOSCOPIC THERAPY-RESISTENT OESOPHAGUS VARICEAL BLEEDING]

ERŐSS Bálint Mihály, SZÉKELY György, SIKET Ferenc, LÁZÁR István

[INTRODUCTION - Liver cirrhosis has two serious consequences: hepatic failure and portal hypertension. Portal hypertension has two important clinical appearances: variceal bleeding and therapy resistant ascites. Variceal bleeding can be recurrent and resistant to endoscopic treatment. These complications can be prevented by implantation of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS). CLINICAL CASE - A 59 year old male with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C, was hospitalized in our department in April 2004 with variceal bleeding. We tried to control the bleeding twice by band ligation, once by sclerotherapy and with the use of Sengstaken-Blakemore tube, but bleeding continued for three weeks despite the endoscopic treatment. The patient needed intensive care therapy and was treated with more than forty units of packed red cells and plasma. At that point we decided to implant a TIPS, which was carried out succesfully. After TIPS implantation no rebleeding occured and the shunt had good patency. Moderate hepatic encephalopathy was observed, which is a well known phenomenon, but it could be treated with pharmacologic therapy. CONCLUSIONS - In case of portal hypertension TIPS implantation can prevent from variceal rebleedings and may caus significant improvement in the quality of life.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[SCREENING OF PSYCHIATRIC SIDE EFFECT OF INTERFERON THERAPY WITH QUESTIONNAIRE]

GAZDAG Gábor, SZABÓ Zsuzsa

[INTRODUCTION - Interferon therapy is an effective treatment of several oncological, hematological and viral diseases but it can precipitate serious side effects too. Among others the most frequent are the psychiatric symptoms. These symptoms are also the most frequent reasons of non-compliance and early cessation of treatment which can be avoided with rapid recognition and adequate treatment. Therefore, the early recognition of the psychiatric symptoms is of high importance. METHODS AND RESULTS - Authors report a self-administered questionnaire developed to screen the most frequent psychiatric symptoms precipitated by interferon treatment. They also present the evaluation method for the questionnaire, which makes the evaluation of the data easier for non-psychiatrist doctors as well. Between September 2004 and July 2005 all interferon treated patients who also had psychiatric consultation filled in the questionnaire. The number of patients was 26. Authors set up a decision-making algorhythm for the evaluation, so the non-psychiatrist doctors were able to judge whether a psychiatric consultation was needed as well as its urgency. With the data of 26 interferon treated patients who all went through a psychiatric consultation during a 10 months period, authors discuss their first experience, going into details in the three false positive and the two false negative cases. CONCLUSION - Authors founded the questionnaire helpful in the clinical practice and recommended the use for doctors working in general practice. They also suggest to carry it further research with more patients to strengthen the results.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Peptic ulcer disease - facts and questions]

WERLING Klára

Lege Artis Medicinae

[MEDICAL TREATMENT OF LOWER URINARY TRACT SYMPTOMS DUE TO BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA - RISK FACTORS AND SIDE-EFFECTS]

KARSZA Attila

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Over the second half of the 19th century, numerous theories arose concerning mechanisms involved in understanding of action, imitative learning, language development and theory of mind. These explorations gained new momentum with the discovery of the so called “mirror neurons”. Rizzolatti’s work inspired large groups of scientists seeking explanation in a new and hitherto unexplored area of how we perceive and understand the actions and intentions of others, how we learn through imitation to help our own survival, and what mechanisms have helped us to develop a unique human trait, language. Numerous studies have addressed these questions over the years, gathering information about mirror neurons themselves, their subtypes, the different brain areas involved in the mirror neuron system, their role in the above mentioned mechanisms, and the varying consequences of their dysfunction in human life. In this short review, we summarize the most important theories and discoveries that argue for the existence of the mirror neuron system, and its essential function in normal human life or some pathological conditions.