Lege Artis Medicinae

[LARGE VESSEL MANIFESTATION OF GIANTCELL ARTERITIS]

KOLOSSVÁRY Endre, PINTÉR Hajnalka, ERÉNYI Éva, KOLLÁR Attila, FARKAS Katalin, KISS István, HARCOS Péter, SIMON Károly

FEBRUARY 21, 2004

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2004;14(02)

[The diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis is a real challenge for clinicians. There are several reasons for the difficulties in establishing the diagnosis. This disease is associated to rare conditions, therefore most physicians lack clinical experience. This condition shows very heterogeneous manifestation, the intensity of the symptoms vary in time. Early diagnosis is of great importance in order to prevent ischemic complications. Among these complications one should emphasise the role of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy that may result in abrupt blindness. In this case report, we show a rare socalled large vessel manifestation of giant-cell arteritis. This form of the disease needs different approach in diagnosis where color duplex ultrasonography may have distinguished importance. The final verification of the diagnosis is based on histology. However the lack of all histological criteria do not exclude the presence of giant-cell arteritis.]

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FERENCZI Sándor

[Primary tubulointerstitial nephritis is characterised by an inflammatory infiltrate of tubulointerstitial space. The infiltrate consists of T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, neutrophyl and eosinophyl granulocytes in varying degree. It is associated with interstitial oedema and different level of tubular damage. The disease exists in acute and chronic form. The main causes of this condition are: drugs, infection, systemic diseases, malignancy and in some cases the disease is idiopathic. The pathogenesis in most cases is immune-mediated. The secondary form of tubulointerstitial nephritis can occur in primary glomerular and vascular disease and is characterised by tubulointerstitial fibrosis and tubulus atrophy. The morphological alterations are major determinants of the progression of chronic renal disease. In both forms of tubulointerstitial nephritis the development of renal insufficiency is often observed.]

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[THE HISTORY OF FLUOROQUINOLONES]

LUDWIG Endre

[During the 40 year history of quinolones, from the first compounds (nalidixic acid, oxolinic acid, norfloxacin) suitable only for the treatment of mild urinary tract infections, an important group of antimicrobials was developed that can be used for the treatment of serious Gramnegative (ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin) and Grampositive (levofloxacin, moxifloxacin) infections. With the changes in the antimicrobial spectrum of the new derivatives it seems, that the clinical indications of the mainly anti-Gram-positive and the mainly anti-Gram-negative fluoroquinolones can be separated. We also learned the characteristics of their antibacterial activity that makes the optimal administration possible assuring the maximum clinical efficacy and the minimal development of bacterial resistance. The activity of fluoroquinolones can also be compromised by bacterial resistance so to preserve their clinical value it is important to follow the above mentioned principles in their use.]

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Over the second half of the 19th century, numerous theories arose concerning mechanisms involved in understanding of action, imitative learning, language development and theory of mind. These explorations gained new momentum with the discovery of the so called “mirror neurons”. Rizzolatti’s work inspired large groups of scientists seeking explanation in a new and hitherto unexplored area of how we perceive and understand the actions and intentions of others, how we learn through imitation to help our own survival, and what mechanisms have helped us to develop a unique human trait, language. Numerous studies have addressed these questions over the years, gathering information about mirror neurons themselves, their subtypes, the different brain areas involved in the mirror neuron system, their role in the above mentioned mechanisms, and the varying consequences of their dysfunction in human life. In this short review, we summarize the most important theories and discoveries that argue for the existence of the mirror neuron system, and its essential function in normal human life or some pathological conditions.

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