Lege Artis Medicinae

[In the Winter Night]

NEMESÁNSZKY Elemér

FEBRUARY 21, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(02)

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Restless leg syndrome frequency in health workers

ÖCAL Ruhsen, ATGÜDEN Gizem, AYCAN Cagri, BALABAN Zeynep, SENAR Seran, YAVUZ Sena

Introduction - Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) is a disease, primarily composed of sensational symptoms, caused by the urge to move lower extremities especially at night, and characterized by undesired feelings of the legs. Decreasing of the dopaminergic effect at night is thought to be responsible from these symptoms. RLS patients suffer from low quality of sleep affecting their daily life activities even causing socio-economic loss. Although RLS is a common and treatable disease, it can not be diagnosed easily due to the variability of symptoms. Aim - The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of RLS among health workers and to define the disease causing factors. Method - A questionnaire was applied to 174 randomly selected health workers at Baskent University Medical Faculty (KA17/285). The demographic information, history of illnesses or usage of drugs, socioeconomic status, working hours and daytime sleepiness were questioned. Included in the questionnaire were diagnostic criteria for RLS, frequency assessment scale, and survey of sleep quality. We used “the diagnostic criteria of international RLS working group” for the diagnosis, and “Pittsburgh sleep quality index survey” to determine the quality of sleep. Reliability and validity studies were performed on both tests. Results - A significant relationship between socio-economic status and RLS was found (p<0.05) as an increase of RLS frequency in parallel with decreased socio-economic status. RLS was found to be common among health workers. We suggest that health workers should be checked regularly, and they should be informed about the disease in order to raise an awareness and hence increase their quality of life.

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[INTRODUCTION - Satisfying sleep is especially important for physicians. Our study analyses physicians’ sleep and dream from the point of view of continuous nightand- day duty. SAMPLE AND METHOD - Questionnaires were completed by 125 physicians among whom the proportion of night shift taking and only day-time working persons was equal. The questionnaire contained the Athens Insomnia Scale and the Dream Quality Questionnaire as well as questions about demographical characteristics and work circumstances. RESULTS - Almost each doctor mentioned sleep problems, principally daytime sleepiness (78%) and sleep deprivation (70%). Long sleep latency is reported more often by women doctors; the frequency of night awakenings increases, while daytime sleepiness decreases by age. The feeling of performance-loss is more prevalent among night shift takers. Dream characteristics differ significantly neither along demographical characteristics nor by work shifts. CONCLUSION - Although sleep problems are more frequent among physicians when comparing to the Hungarian general population, the frequency of clinical level insomnia is not higher. On the other hand, physicians can recall their dreams more often (25% vs 7%) and the emotional load of their dreams influence their daytime mood more commonly.]

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[CLINICAL ANALYSIS OF PATIENTS WITH PERIPHERAL FACIAL PALSY]

ILNICZKY Sándor

[symptoms. In two thirds of the cases the cause is unknown, this is called “idiopathic peripheral facial palsy or Bell’s palsy”, but several different diseases have to be considered in the differential diagnosis. In this paper we reviewed the case histories of 110 patients treated for “peripheral facial palsy” in the Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University, Budapest in a five year period, 2000-2004. We studied the age, gender distribution, seasonal occurance, comorbidities, sidedness, symptoms, circumstances of referral to the hospital, the initial diagnoses and therapeutic options. We also discuss the probable causes and consequences of diagnostic failures. Results: the proportion of males and females was equal. There was no considerable difference between sexes regarding agedistribution. Of the 110 patients 106 was diagnosed with idiopathic Bell’s palsy, three cases with otic herpes zoster and one patient with Lyme disease. In our material, peripheral facial palsy was significantly more frequent in the cold period of late autumn, winter, and early spring. Diabetes mellitus and hypertension were more frequent than in the general population. 74% of the patients were admitted within two days from the onset of the symptoms. In 37% preliminary diagnosis was unavailable. In 15% cerebrovascular insult was the first, incorrect diagnosis, the correct diagnosis of “Bell’s palsy” was provided only in 16%. The probable causes of diagnostic failures may be the misleading symptoms and accompanying conditions. We examined the different therapies applied and reviewed the literature in this topic. We conclude that intravenous corticosteroid treatment in the early stage of the disease is the therapy of choice.]

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[A Winter in Mallorca – Chopin and George Sand ]

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