Lege Artis Medicinae

[Epidemiological ideas in the 16th century]

KEMENES Pál

AUGUST 31, 1993

Lege Artis Medicinae - 1993;3(08)

[The epidemiological ideas of the 16th century were based on two different principles: knowledge gained through experience and views derived from a metaphysical picture. The former group includes knowledge about the spread of disease and the eradication of epidemics, while the latter group consists of explanations of the causes and development of epidemics. Iatrodemonology, iatroastrology, iatroteology and iatromagic, with their specific God-Evil-Ember image, the health-disease, life-death relations implicit in the world structure defined by creation myths, provided the most ancient epidemiological ideas and, in the 16th century, the ones that flourished during the religious renaissance. Disease or epidemic, God's punishment, the Devil's revenge, or a particular stage of existence. ]

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Lege Artis Medicinae

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Lege Artis Medicinae

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[Correspondence]

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Lege Artis Medicinae

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