Lege Artis Medicinae

[A 19th century uomo universale]

HOLLÓSI Éva

SEPTEMBER 29, 1993

Lege Artis Medicinae - 1993;3(09)

[Karl Gustav Carus (1789-1869) graduated in medicine and philosophy at the same time, aged 25, but also studied other fields of science, including physics, chemistry, botany, zoology and geology.From 1811, he worked as an obstetrician and practising physician and teacher throughout his life. Carus became court physician to the King of Saxony in 1827, and later became a member and even president of several medical and scientific bodies. One of the first stages in his wide-ranging scientific activities was his textbook on gynaecology; he was one of the first to study and teach comparative anatomy. He published several works on the nervous system and the circulation of the blood.]

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