LAM KID

[The role of diet in the prevention of musculoskeletal diseases]

SPEER Gábor, SPEER Józsefné

MAY 30, 2013

LAM KID - 2013;3(02)

[In the European Union, the lowest incidence of osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis has been reported in the Mediterranean area. However, for a long time only a few nutrients’ effects have been studied on BMD. Of these, the favourable effects of wine, fermented cheese and fruit and vegetable consumption have been demonstrated in the alleviation of both osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. A number of promising studies are being conducted with analogues of antioxidant components of the mediterranean diet. Some of these components decrease the levels of pathological factors, such as interleukin-1, -6, -17, TNF-α, JAK2/STAT3, which are the targets of a number of efficient drugs. These findings demonstrate the significance of diet in the development of musculoskeletal diseases. In our review article, we present the above mentioned data, illustrated by some of our own recipes.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

LAM KID

[Radiological examinatons in multiple myeloma]

GYŐRI Gabriella, MAGYAR Péter, NAGY Zsolt

LAM KID

[Discontinuation of denosumab and associated fracture incidence: analysis from the FREEDOM trial]

SPEER Gábor

LAM KID

[Potential antiosteoporotic agents from plants]

BALLA Bernadett

LAM KID

[Modern medical and dietary treatment of gout in light of the new American guidelines]

SZEKANECZ Zoltán

[After several decades of “silence”, in the past few years a number of new data and treatment options have become available regarding the management of hyperuricaemy and gout. We also have a better understanding of the immunpathogenic processes of the disease, resulting in new medicines, as well as dietary and lifestyle modifications. Finally, in 2012, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has published new guidelines, which provide detailed algorhythms for each stage of gout and for special clinical situations. Although some aspects of clinical practice in Europe are different from that in the US, the new guidelines are applicable - with the necessary adaptations - in Hungary for the efficient treatment of gout and its comorbidities.]

LAM KID

[Somatic oncogene mutations in thyroid tumours]

TOBIÁS Bálint, KÓSA János Pál

All articles in the issue

Related contents

LAM KID

[Current treatment and rehabilitation of the hip fractures - The role of orthopedic surgeons in the investigation and treatment of osteoporosis]

FLÓRIS István, KRICSFALUSY Mihály, UDVARDY Csaba, SOMOGYI Péter

[The treatment of proximal femoral fractures is one of the most common surgical indications in traumatology, on the other hand, it requires a significant proportion of health expenditures. The structure of our society is going to shift toward the older generation in the next decades, which increases the importance of the above factors. New implants and surgical techniques appear in order to make the treatment more effective, thus allowing the patient’s early rehabilitation. In this article, we summarise the diagnosis and treatment of hip fractures, the most serious consequence of osteoporosis, and describe the results of rehabilitation. We describe the role and possibilities of orthopedic surgeons in the investigation and treatment of patients with osteoporotic hip fractures as well as possibilities of tertiary prevention and suggest possibilities of cooperation among the co-professions dealing with osteoporosis in the treatment of this patient group.]

LAM KID

[Estimating the risk of new fracture - Which factors confer an increased fracture risk?]

TAKÁCS István

[This risk of osteoporosis-related fractures is influenced by a number of well-known risk factors. Among the approaches to quantify bone fracture risk, the FRAX questionnaire is the most widespread in everyday practice. However, this method only provides a probability percentage for the physician, and it is unable to specify or weigh the factors that may have a particular importance in evaluating individual fracture risk, or choosing the appropriate therapy in patients with previous osteoporotic fracture. This summary aims to provide practical help for the evaluation of individual fracture risk in patients who have had bone fractures.]

LAM KID

[The pathogenic and clinical significance of the RANK-RANKL-osteoprotegerin system in rheumatoid arthritis]

SZENTPÉTERY Ágnes, VÁNCSA Andrea, SZABÓ Zoltán, SZEKANECZ Zoltán

[Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by increased local and generalised bone resorption, which manifests in the develoment of marginal erosions and generalised osteoporosis, respectively. An increasing number of data suggest that lymphocytes, proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators involved in inflammation contribute to arthritic bone resorption. Therefore, the term ‘osteoimmunology’ has also become widely used. In RA, Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor kappa B (RANK) and its ligand (RANKL) play a crucial role in bone resorption. These proteins, which belong to the tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a) receptor and TNF ligand superfamilies, respectively, activate osteoclasts while interacting with T cells, synovial fibroblasts and other cytokines (e.g. IL-1, IL-17), which results in bone resorption. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a decoy receptor that also belongs to the TNF receptor family and inhibits RANK-RANKL interactions. There is increased RANKL production and decreased OPG production in RA. The interaction of RANKL with IL-17 is particularly important. Regarding therapy, sulfasalazine, methotrexate and biological agents, especially TNF inhibitors suppress RANKL-mediated bone resorption and thus the development of joint erosions. RANKL-RANK interaction can be directly inhibited by recombinant OPG or anti-RANKL antibody (denosumab). Among these agents, denosumab gave promising results in experiments performed in animal models of arthritis. These were followed by a phase II human RA trial, which proved that denosumab decreased MRI erosion scores in RA.]

Ca&Bone

[Bone metabolism and body mass index in postmenopausal women]

TÁRCZY Csaba, TOLDY Erzsébet, SZERB János, VARGA László

[INTRODUCTION - In addition to several other causes constitutional factors play an important role in the development of osteoporosis.Various aspects of bone metabolism were examined to explain the differences in bone density between women with low and high body mass index (BMI). PATIENTS AND METHOD - One hundred and ninetytwo postmenopausal women were included in the study. Bone density was measured by forearm densitometry.To assess bone formation, serum osteocalcin levels were measured, while the rate of bone absorption was estimated from C-terminal telopeptide levels of collagen type I measured in urine and blood. RESULTS - The prevalence of osteoporosis was higher in women with low BMI than in those with normal or higher BMI. Bone metabolism - both formation and absorption - was increased in both groups, however, in women with low BMI this increase was more pronounced and bone metabolism tended to be shifted to absorption compared to patients with normal or higher BMI. CONCLUSION - Postmenopausal lean women have accelerated bone metabolism compared to obese women. This fact and the shift to absorption may be the main reasons for the higher frequency of osteoporosis found by densitometry in women with low BMI than in those with higher BMI.]

LAM KID

[Sacral insufficiency fractures]

FERENC Mária, PUHL Mária, VARGA Péter Pál

[BACKGROUND - The spontaneous osteoporotic fracture of the sacrum, known as a sacral insufficiency fracture (SIF) was first described as an unrecognized syndrome of the elderly by Laurie, in 1982. Numerous case histories and a few series of cases have been discussed in medical journals; however, none have been reported in Hungary. GOAL - To delineate the leading diagnostic steps in the recognition of SIF and review the therapeutic guidelines. CASE HISTORIES, METHODS - Between January 2009 and the first six months of 2010 11 cases of SIF were diagnosed at the National Center for Spinal Disorders. We examined the clinical aspects of the illness, the radiological modalities, the fracture markings, the pace of recovery and duration. RESULTS - The 11 patients were found to have various SIF predestining etiological factors and the following classic fractures - H-type, unilateral, horizontal, unilateralhorizontal and vertical as well as a bilateral pattern. In cases often not showing obvious clinical symptoms and in cases resulting in conventional radiological examinations of low sensitivity and specificity, we used mapping techniques in setting up the exact diagnosis. CONCLUSION - If we consider SIF from patient history and known risk factors, diagnostic procedure (primer original) may be shortened and a number of unnecessary tests (biopsy) may be avoided.]