LAM KID

[Sacral insufficiency fractures]

FERENC Mária1, PUHL Mária1, VARGA Péter Pál1

OCTOBER 04, 2013

LAM KID - 2013;3(03)

[BACKGROUND - The spontaneous osteoporotic fracture of the sacrum, known as a sacral insufficiency fracture (SIF) was first described as an unrecognized syndrome of the elderly by Laurie, in 1982. Numerous case histories and a few series of cases have been discussed in medical journals; however, none have been reported in Hungary. GOAL - To delineate the leading diagnostic steps in the recognition of SIF and review the therapeutic guidelines. CASE HISTORIES, METHODS - Between January 2009 and the first six months of 2010 11 cases of SIF were diagnosed at the National Center for Spinal Disorders. We examined the clinical aspects of the illness, the radiological modalities, the fracture markings, the pace of recovery and duration. RESULTS - The 11 patients were found to have various SIF predestining etiological factors and the following classic fractures - H-type, unilateral, horizontal, unilateralhorizontal and vertical as well as a bilateral pattern. In cases often not showing obvious clinical symptoms and in cases resulting in conventional radiological examinations of low sensitivity and specificity, we used mapping techniques in setting up the exact diagnosis. CONCLUSION - If we consider SIF from patient history and known risk factors, diagnostic procedure (primer original) may be shortened and a number of unnecessary tests (biopsy) may be avoided.]

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  1. Országos Gerincgyógyászati Központ

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Further articles in this publication

LAM KID

[Vitamin D treatment: hormone therapy for patients who need it or simply a supplementation for everyone?]

SPEER Gábor

[Various medical associations issue different recommendations for the prevention and treatment of vitamin D deficiency. These significant differences are partly explained by the different definition of normal vitamin D level and the use of completely different mathematical models to predict the increase in vitamin D level as a response to therapy. According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the target vitamin D level is 20 ng/ml, whereas the Endocrine Society (ES) recommends 30 ng/m as the miminum target value. According to the ES, a 1 ng/ml increase of vitamin D level can be reached by a daily intake of 100 NE, while the IOM recommends 3.6 ng/ml. Moreover, the IOM states that the effect of therapy on serum level is nonlinear. These differences show that the ES and IOM have different views on the risk of adverse effects. The IOM recommends 400 IU vitamin D daily for children younger than 1 year, 800 IU for those above 70 years and 600 IU/per day for everyone else. The ES recommend 400-1000 IU daily for all infants and 1500- 2000 IU for adults. Screening, however, is not recommended by either society. To decrease uncertainty concerning the side effects of higher-dose vitamin D treatment, it is important to understand, use and support the function of the pharmacovigilance system of the pharmaceutical industry that manufactures and markets various (prescription, over-the-counter) preparations. This is what the author aims to highlight in the second part of this article. Using this system, both the doctor and the patient can help support and accept the justification of higher-dose vitamin D therapy.]

LAM KID

[Is a paradigm shift possible in the clinical practice of preventing recurrent fractures?]

TAKÁCS István

[Recurrent osteoporotic bone fractures are less and less considered “natural”, due to the immense variety of products available for treatment. In order to prevent recurrent fractures, treatment should be started in time, and a careful approach is needed to choose the appropriate treatment, and, if needed, to switch therapy. When choosing the therapeutic approach, we have to decide whether it corresponds to the severity of the osteoporosis and the risk of fracture. In order to do this, we have to consider bone quality, previous fractures, the condition of cortical bones and the mode of action of the selected treatment, in addition to the easily evaluated density value. The aim of this article is to provide practical help for the above mentioned decisionmaking process.]

LAM KID

[A simple method to detect urate crystals in formalin-fixed tissue]

BÉLY Miklós, KRUTSAY Miklós

[In our previous study we refuted the thesis that sodium urate crystals are not, or only rarely detectable in formalin-fixed histological samples because they dissolve in the aqueous formalin solution. Our observations indicate that dissolution of urate crystals is primarily caused by haematoxylineosin staining. Undeniably, however, urate crystals are partially dissolved in the aqueous solution of formaldehyde, and thus a small amount of urate deposits may totally dissolve from tissue samples. The aim of the present study was to identify those steps of the staining procedure that are responsible for the dissolution of urate crystals. We found that the dissolution of urate crystals during the course of staining was caused by the combined effects of haematoxylin staining, treatment with 1% aqueous lithium carbonate solution and dehydration with acetone. As the simplest histological method for the detection of urate crystals, we recommend examining unstained sections (mounted with Canada balsam) of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples in polarised light. According to our previous study, about two thirds of urate crystals remain detectable on unstaied sections, whereas haematoxylin-eosin stained sections of the same tissue samples (derived from patients with gout) did not contain urate crystals. In the samples where urate crystals could be detected in haematoxylin- eosin stained sections using polarised light, the unstained sections contained much more crystals, which shows that dissolution is greatly decreased on unstained sections.]

LAM KID

[Infective sacroiliitis]

BARTHA Attila

[INTRODUCTION - Pyogen infection of the sacroiliac joint occurs rarely in rheumatological practice. Its clinical symptoms are diverse, so the diagnosis is often made late. CASE REPORT - The author presents a case of a 67-year-old woman. The patient did not have any major diseases nor any predisposing factors for infection. Five days after doing hard physical work she felt strong pain irradiating from her lower back to the right lower limb. She was referred to the Department of Neurology with the diagnosis of right lumbar radiculopathy. She was primarily examined for tumours because of her high red blood cell sedimentation rate and CRP level and her inability to walk. The correct diagnosis was set up on the basis of MRI examination: infective sacroiliitis on the right side, which has spreaded to the adjacent tissues. USguided biopsy was unsuccesful, so empiric antibioitic treatment was started. The patient was discharged from hopsital after 35 days and continued clindamycin therapy at home. At control examination 6 month later she did not have any symptoms or complaints and laboratory examinations did not indicate inflammatory activity. MRI examination still showed an extensive oedema. CONCLUSION - Pyogen arthritis should be considered even in the absence of fever, leukocytosis and predisposing factors. By making the correct diagnosis and starting long-term antibiotic therapy in time, joint destruction is preventable and the patient is curable.]

LAM KID

[Congress of the Hungarian Society for Osteoporosis and Osteoarthrology 2013]

BALLA Bernadett

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Management of bone metabolism in epilepsy

UÇAN TOKUÇ Ezgi Firdevs , FATMA Genç, ABIDIN Erdal, YASEMIN Biçer Gömceli

Many systemic problems arise due to the side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used in epilepsy patients. Among these adverse effects are low bone mineral density and increased fracture risk due to long-term AED use. Although various studies have supported this association with increased risk in recent years, the length of this process has not been precisely defined and there is no clear consensus on bone density scanning, intervals of screening, and the subject of calcium and vitamin D supplementation. In this study, in accordance with the most current recommendations, our applications and data, including the detection of possible bone mineralization disorders, treatment methods, and recommendations to prevent bone mineralization disorders, were evaluated in epilepsy patients who were followed up at our outpatient clinic. It was aimed to draw attention to the significance of management of bone metabolism carried out with appropriate protocols. Epilepsy patients were followed up at the Antalya Training and Research Hospital Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Outpatient Clinic who were at high risk for osteoporosis (use of valproic acid [VPA] and enzyme-inducing drugs, using any AED for over 5 years, and postmenopausal women) and were evaluated using a screening protocol. According to this protocol, a total of 190 patients suspected of osteoporosis risk were retrospectively evaluated. Four patients were excluded from the study due to secondary osteoporosis. Of the 186 patients who were included in the study, 97 (52.2%) were women and 89 (47.8%) were men. Prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD) was 42%, in which osteoporosis was detected in 11.8% and osteopenia in 30.6% of the patients. Osteoporosis rate was higher at the young age group (18-45) and this difference was statistically significant (p=0.018). There was no significant difference between male and female sexes according to osteoporosis and osteopenia rates. Patients receiving polytherapy had higher osteoporosis rate and lower BMD compared to patients receiving monotherapy. Comparison of separate drug groups according to osteoporosis rate revealed that osteoporosis rate was highest in patient groups using VPA+ carbamazepine (CBZ) (29.4%) and VPA polytherapy (19.4%). Total of osteopenia and osteoporosis, or low BMD, was highest in VPA polytherapy (VPA+ non-enzyme-inducing AED [NEID]) and CBZ polytherapy (CBZ+NEID) groups, with rates of 58.3% and 55.1%, respectively. In addition, there was no significant difference between drug groups according to bone metabolism markers, vitamin D levels, and osteopenia-osteoporosis rates. Assuming bone health will be affected at an early age in epilepsy patients, providing lifestyle and diet recommendations, avoiding polytherapy including VPA and CBZ when possible, and evaluating bone metabolism at regular intervals are actions that should be applied in routine practice.

Clinical Neuroscience

Risk factors for ischemic stroke and stroke subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease

GÜLER Siber, NAKUS Engin, UTKU Ufuk

Background - The aim of this study was to compare ischemic stroke subtypes with the effects of risk factors, the relationship between grades of kidney disease and the severity of stroke subtypes. Methods - The current study was designed retrospectively and performed with data of patients who were hospitalised due to ischemic stroke. We included 198 subjects who were diagnosed with ischemic stroke of Grade 3 and above with chronic kidney disease. Results - In our study were reported advanced age, coronary artery disease, moderate kidney disease as the most frequent risk factors for cardioembolic etiology. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking and alcohol consumption were the most frequent risk factors for large-artery disease. Female sex and anaemia were the most frequent risk factors for small-vessel disease. Dialysis and severe kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors in unknown etiologies, while male sex, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke and mild kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors for other etiologies. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were lower for small-vessel disease compared with other etiologies. This relation was statistically significant (p=0.002). Conclusion - In order to improve the prognosis in ischemic stroke with chronic kidney disease, the risk factors have to be recognised and the treatment options must be modified according to those risk factors.

Clinical Neuroscience

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ÁDÁM Szilvia, CSERHÁTI Zoltán, MÉSZÁROS Veronika

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Clinical Neuroscience

Comparison of hospitalized acute stroke patients’ characteristics using two large central-eastern european databases

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Objectives – Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the European region. In spite of a decreasing trend, stroke related mortality remains higher in Hungary and Romania when compared to the EU average. This might be due to higher incidence, increased severity or even less effective care. Methods – In this study we used two large, hospital based databases from Targu Mures (Romania) and Debrecen (Hungary) to compare not only the demographic characteristics of stroke patients from these countries but also the risk factors, as well as stroke severity and short term outcome. Results – The gender related distribution of patients was similar to those found in the European Survey, whereas the mean age of patients at stroke onset was similar in the two countries but lower by four years. Although the length of hospital stay was significantly different in the two countries it was still much shorter (about half) than in most reports from western European countries. The overall fatality rate in both databases, regardless of gender was comparable to averages from Europe and other countries. In both countries we found a high number of risk factors, frequently overlapping. The prevalence of risk factors (hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidaemia) was higher than those reported in other countries, which can explain the high ratio of recurring stroke. Discussion – In summary, the comparatively analyzed data from the two large databases showed several similarities, especially regarding the high number of modifiable risk factors, and as such further effort is needed regarding primary prevention.

Clinical Neuroscience

The evaluation of the relationship between risk factors and prognosis in intracerebral hemorrhage patients

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Objective - Patients were assessed in terms of risk factors, hematoma size and localization, the effects of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) on mortality and morbidity, and post-stroke depression. Materials and methods - The present study evaluated the demographic data, risk factors, and neurological examinations of 216 ICH patients. The diagnosis, volume, localization, and ventricular extension of the hematomas were determined using computed tomography scans. The mortality rate through the first 30 days was evaluated using ICH score and ICH grading scale. The Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to determine the dependency status and functional recovery of each patient, and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was administered to assess the psychosocial status of each patient. Results - The mean age of the patients was 65.3±14.5 years. The most common locations of the ICH lesions were as follows: lobar (28.3%), thalamus (26.4%), basal ganglia (24.0%), cerebellum (13.9%), and brainstem (7.4%). The average hematoma volume was 15.8±23.8 cm3; a ventricular extension of the hemorrhage developed in 34.4% of the patients, a midline shift in 28.7%, and perihematomal edema, as the most frequently occurring complication, in 27.8%. Over the 6-month follow-up period, 57.9% of patients showed a poor prognosis (mRS: ≥3), while 42.1% showed a good prognosis (mRS: <3). The mortality rate over the first 30 days was significantly higher in patients with a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score at admission, a large hematoma volume, and ventricular extension of the hemorrhage (p=0.0001). In the poor prognosis group, the presence of moderate depression (39.13%) was significantly higher than in the good prognosis group (p=0.0001). Conclusion - Determination and evaluation of the factors that could influence the prognosis and mortality of patients with ICH is crucial for the achievement of more effective patient management and improved quality of life.