LAM KID

[On the culture of wine]

DÁNIEL Zsolt

MARCH 30, 2013

LAM KID - 2013;3(01)

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Further articles in this publication

LAM KID

[Effect of lactose intolerance on bone metabolism]

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[ParmigianoReggiano cheese and bone health]

BALLA Bernadett

LAM KID

[A dogma of histochemistry that seems to be refuted - histological detectability of urate crystals]

BÉLY Miklós, KRUTSAY Miklós

[In medical practice there are a number of “truths etched in stone” that are passed on from textbook to textbook and learned by generations before they become obsolete. This short study aims to eliminate a misbelief from the diagnosis of gout that is related to the histological detectability of urate deposits. According to the generally accepted thesis, urate crystals obtained from patients with gout are dissolved in formalin solution, therefore, tissue samples should be fixated in alcohol. The authors have found that urate crystals can be detected on conventionally mounted, native (unstained) sections, despite formalin fixation, whereas the great majority of urate crystals are dissolved during haematoxylin-eosin staining. Therefore, for the detection of urate crystals the tissue samples should be examined on native, unstained sections.]

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[Vitamin D deficiency is critical at the end of winter - Vitamin D Day, 23rd February]

NÉMETH Éva

LAM KID

[The role of bone turnover markers in the diagnosis and therapy of osteoporosis]

HONTVÁRI Lívia, KRÁNICZ Ágota

[Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone diseasecharacterised by decreased bone mass andimpaired bone turnover, which leads to anincreased risk of fractures and significantmorbidity and mortality. Its social and pub-lic health impact and the importance of itsearly and accurate diagnosis are indis-putable. The aim of timely and efficienttherapy is to improve bone quality as wellas to prevent the dreaded complications ofbone fractures. In clinical practice, labora-tory diagnosis of biochemical bone mark-ers are particularly important for therapeu-tic monitoring. In this article, reviewing lit-erature data, we discuss bone-specificmarkers from the clinician’s perspective,and highlight their importance in everydayclinical practice. ]

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[Exploring human personality focused mainly on trait and state markers of behaviour so far. Nevertheless, the concept of the universal, culture-independent model of personality carries more disturbing difficulties: hardly understandable inter-cultural conflicts, culture-related mental disorders and scientific experiences with unexpected outcomes. It can be hypothesized, that beside personality concept represented by the Euro-Atlantic civilisation and mainstream psychology there is an alternative concept of personality. Opposed to the independent, autonomous ego concept of individualistic cultures, collectivistic (primarily far-eastern) cultures are providing an interdependent model. According to this model, the core element of personality are determined rather by social embedding instead of the person’s own characteristics, which are secondary to the personal traits and characteristics. This study attempts to briefly outline the concept of interdependent personality, with some illustrative clinical examples. ]