LAM KID

[On the culture of wine]

DÁNIEL Zsolt

MARCH 30, 2013

LAM KID - 2013;3(01)

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Further articles in this publication

LAM KID

[Osseal and extraosseal effects of vitamin D]

GAÁL János

[The author reviews the literature on the osseal and extraosseal effects of vitamin D, discussing the role of vitamin D sufficiency in the maintenance of normal bone structure and bone mass, in fracture prevention and in the efficacy on antiporotic treatment. The effects of vitamin D on hemopoiesis, tumours, muscles, articular cartilage, lungs, cardiovascular system, central nervous system, skin and certain metabolic disorders are also discussed. The paper particularly emphasises and describes on a cellular level the immune-modulating effect of vitamin D and its influence on autoimmune disorders.]

LAM KID

[The role of bone turnover markers in the diagnosis and therapy of osteoporosis]

HONTVÁRI Lívia, KRÁNICZ Ágota

[Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone diseasecharacterised by decreased bone mass andimpaired bone turnover, which leads to anincreased risk of fractures and significantmorbidity and mortality. Its social and pub-lic health impact and the importance of itsearly and accurate diagnosis are indis-putable. The aim of timely and efficienttherapy is to improve bone quality as wellas to prevent the dreaded complications ofbone fractures. In clinical practice, labora-tory diagnosis of biochemical bone mark-ers are particularly important for therapeu-tic monitoring. In this article, reviewing lit-erature data, we discuss bone-specificmarkers from the clinician’s perspective,and highlight their importance in everydayclinical practice. ]

LAM KID

[Effect of lactose intolerance on bone metabolism]

SPEER Gábor, LAKATOS Péter

LAM KID

[Impact of denosumab on the peripheral skeleton of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: bone density, mass, and strength of the radius, and wrist fracture]

BALLA Bernadett

LAM KID

[ParmigianoReggiano cheese and bone health]

BALLA Bernadett

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurophobia]

SZIRMAI Imre

[Neurophobia is the fear of neurological diseases. Its main symptom is that medical students and young doctors are not able to utilize their basic neurological knowledge at the bedside. According to statistics, every second student suffers from neurophobia. This attitude could explain why in the last two decades less and less young doctors wanted to become neurologist. Medical students complain that they receive no instructions, and are afraid of loosing their interest and of facing the failure of their competency. The hardship of neurology was explained by the insufficient knowledge of anatomy and the infrequent encounter with patients. Even general practitioners have anxiety about neurological patients. The loss of interest in neurosciences seems to associate with insensitivity of human-centered culture and corruption of empathic thinking. The burnout syndrome of medical doctors and students can be explained by stress, loss of respect, permanent competition, independency that interferes with responsibility, stiff hierarchy of medical society, fear of diagnostic failures and of economical difficulties. The scores of depression in female students were higher than in male. The idea of the “good neurologist” has been changed. The business oriented care, the shortage of time, and the financial restrictions corroded the conventional practice and ceased the vocational idealism. At present, personal teaching is going to transform into impersonal multimedia learning. Because of the drastic change of values, the age of inner-oriented professionals has terminated also in the medicine. Medical doctors follow even less the traditional troll of professional behavior, but according the social demands, they choose their specialization for subsistence. The highly esteemed social status of neurologists and psychiatrists is going to sink in Europe. To reduce neurophobia it would be desirable 1. to introduce neurology training in the early years of medical school; 2. to teach neurology in all semesters, 3. to assure the effective teaching of neuro-anatomy and physiology, 4. to organize more one-to-one teacher-student communication. In the United States, residents participate in teaching during their residency training. To master neurology dedicated teachers are necessary whom neurology residents ought to meet personally with optimal frequency. However, these requirements seem to fail because of the chiefly technical characters of the actual reforms.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[PRINCIPLES AND NATIONAL REGULATIONS OF BLOOD DONOR QUALIFICATION]

TOMONKÓ Magdolna

[During the assessment of blood donor candidates the physician considers two factors; first, whether the loss of 450 ml blood would be of any risk for them (e.g., because of hypotension) and second, whether they have any illness, current (seasonal allergy, antibiotic use, etc.) or chronic conditions (oncological or autoimmune disease, drug use, etc.) that may confer risk to the recipient. For the safety of blood preparations it is essential that the donors are dependable individuals who lead a lifestyle of low risk of getting infected (by HIV, hepatitis, etc.). Hungarian practice concerning donor qualification are generally stricter (e.g., because of the differences in the health care system, in the health culture) than the directive of the European Union. This implies that a number of donor candidates are temporarily or permanently disqualified. Following medical interventions (e.g., surgery, transfusion), environmental effects (e.g., radiation exposure) and recovery from diseases, however, the donor may again give blood after a certain period of time. Certain chronic diseases, if properly managed and if the patient is in perfect general condition, do not constitute a cause for exclusion either. General practicioners can greatly contribute to safe national blood supply by identifying and advising potential blood donors.]

LAM KID

[About the culture of the alcohol]

DÁNIEL Zsolt

Hungarian Immunology

[Changes in the signal transduction of T-lymphocytes caused by hyperglycemia]

BOLDIZSÁR Ferenc, BERKI Tímea, MISETA Attila, NÉMETH Péter

[AIMS - Lately the altered calcium balance of different cell types (eg.: erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophil granulocytes) was described in diabetes mellitus. It is also known that patients with diabetes mellitus suffer from various infections more often then healthy individuals because of immunological malfunctions. But the mechanism of these changes is still unclear. In order to investigate the effect of hyperglycemia on the function of immunocompetent cells we established an in vitro diabetes model by culturing human T cells (Jurkat cells) at different glucose concentrations for one week. Then we measured the basal cytosolic calcium level, the calcium signal after ionomycin or anti-CD3 treatment and the tyrosinephosphorylation of signal transducing proteins as well as the fructosamine level of cellular proteins. MATERIALS AND METHOD - Cytosolic free calcium levels were detected by flow cytometry using ion selective fluorescent indicator (Fluo-3 AM). Calcium signals of Jurkat cells were measured after ionomycin or monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody (OKT3) treatment. We also measured the tyrosine-phosphorylation on flow cytometer after anti-CD3 stimulation using indirect immunfluorescent labeling with monoclonal antiphospho- tyrosine antibody. The non-enzymatic glycation of cellular proteins was determined by measuring the fructosamine levels of cell lysates. RESULTS - The higher concentration of extracellular glucose resulted in concentration-dependent elevation of basal cytosolic free calcium level in Jurkat cells. Reduced calcium signal (activation capacity) was measured either after ionomycin or monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody treatments in cells kept at hyperglycemic conditions. In addition, the time kinetics of calcium signal following anti- CD3 activation was found prolonged in the hyperglycemic cells. The tyrosine-phosphorilation of hyperglycemic Jurkat cells also proved to be impaired. High glucose concentrations in tissue culture medium caused increase in the glycation of T-cell proteins. CONCLUSIONS - We propose that increased glycation of proteins involved in calcium transport and/or intracellular signal transduction of T-cells may account for our observations.]

LAM KID

[The role of diet in the prevention of musculoskeletal diseases]

SPEER Gábor, SPEER Józsefné

[In the European Union, the lowest incidence of osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis has been reported in the Mediterranean area. However, for a long time only a few nutrients’ effects have been studied on BMD. Of these, the favourable effects of wine, fermented cheese and fruit and vegetable consumption have been demonstrated in the alleviation of both osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. A number of promising studies are being conducted with analogues of antioxidant components of the mediterranean diet. Some of these components decrease the levels of pathological factors, such as interleukin-1, -6, -17, TNF-α, JAK2/STAT3, which are the targets of a number of efficient drugs. These findings demonstrate the significance of diet in the development of musculoskeletal diseases. In our review article, we present the above mentioned data, illustrated by some of our own recipes.]