LAM KID

[New possibility of treating gout: case report]

DÁNYI Orsolya, MIKÓ Ibolya

SEPTEMBER 19, 2014

LAM KID - 2014;4(03)

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LAM KID

[Forgotten agent: raloxifene]

BENKŐ Ágota

[The largest group of the patients with osteoporosis is postmenopausal women characterized by a state of menopausal hormone deficiency which is results in accelerated bone loss. This increased bone resorption significantly elevates the risk of bone fractures including the most common type, i.e. vertebral fractures. In addition to the increased risk of fractures, estrogen deficiency affects other organs, thus, increasing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, cancers, mood disorders and the symptoms of menopausal syndrome in women after menopause. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, the primary objective is to maintain the existing bone mass, a priority for the prevention and treatment of bone fractures. Hormone deficiency may be prevented by the administration of estrogen but the treatment may have adverse effects such as increased risk of endometrial cancer. An etiological therapy is desirable where the compound used for treatment exerts effects similar to that of estrogen to prevent postmenopausal bone loss as well as reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease without the stimulation of reproductive tissues.]

LAM KID

[Role of patient clubs in successful treatment of osteoporotic patients]

SOMOGYI Péter, GAÁL János, SPEER Gábor

[The significance of osteoporosis is well known, however, the number of patients receiving treatment is only a small fraction of ideal. Besides, the fact that the population is uninformed, the difficulties of making an appointment with a specialist and the unsatisfactory communication of the doctor all play a part in the fact that a high proportion of patients receiving mediation give up treatment prematurely. The Inter - na tional Osteoporosis Foundation supports the establishment of public patient clubs with regular training courses and grants and by doing so it also acknowledges their importance in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The publication, based on the questionnaire filled in by the members of the first Hungarian patient club, the Hungarian Society of Osteopo - rosis Patients in district 3rd, introduces the Hungarian results and points out how important patient clubs are in increasing the success of treatment and it also draws attention to the necessity of establishing further patient clubs in the future.]

LAM KID

[Association of vitamin D status with arterial blood pressure and hypertension risk]

SPEER Gábor

LAM KID

[Pharmacogenetics of osteoporosis]

BALLA Bernadett

LAM KID

[Investigation of vitamin D supply in hospitalized patients]

FATA Emőke, ÁGOTA Katalin, HORVÁTH Dóra Eszter, VIRÁGH Éva, KÁNYÁSI Mária, KOVÁCS LÁSZLÓ, BALOGH Dóra, SCHAFFER Éva, OLÁH András, LŐCSEI Zoltán, SALAMON Antal, TOLDY Erzsébet

[Recent studies have shown that adequate vitamin D level is essential in the maintenance of normal immunological status and presumably, it has a remarkable role even in the healing of some diseases. Vitamin D deficiency is a common phenomenon worldwide. Presently, the accepted marker of vitamin-D status is the total-25-hydroxy- D-vitamin [t-25(OH)D], its level depends on the specific (DBP) and aspecific (albumin) binding proteins. As known, the level of binding proteins may change in the hospitalised patients therefore, the presently used marker could not be reliable for the vitamin status in these cases. Our aim was to measure the D-vitamin supply among hospitalized patients, taking into account the level of binding proteins. METHODS - 401 cases (average age 70±14 years) were sorted from Internal Medicine (IM; 68), Intensiv Care Unit (ICU; 58), Traumatology (203 patients suffered hip fracture) and Dialysis Center (72 patients with end stage renal disease). 127 age and sex matched persons with active lifestyle served as control group. We determined t-25(OH)D, DBP, parathormon (PTHi), albumin and the albumin corrected Ca level. The bioavailable and free vitamin fractions and the free index were calculated. RESULTS - Based on the measured t- 25(OH)D, patients have more frequently suboptimal D-vitamin levels, compared to the control group (66% vs. 97%). Severe Dvitamin deficiency occured nearly 8 times more likely (6% vs. 47%) in the hospitalized patients. Chronic renal failure and malignant diseases seem to be significantly negative influencing factors in the metabolism of the vitamin D. The level of DBP, albumin, t-25(OH)D, Bio-25(OH)D was significantly lower in the patients who died. CONCLUSION - In most cases, t-25(OH)D levels show similar results about the vitamin- D supply than other calculated 25(OH)D fraction ,except for the patients of ICU and IM . The t-25(OH)D, the Bio- 25(OH)D, the DBP and the albumin levels seem to be a good prognostic marker of the outcome.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Hypertension and nephrology

[About the care of patients with hyperuricaemia and gout]

[This consensus document is intended to provide guidance for the effective and efficient treatment of asymptomatic individuals with high uric acid levels and gout patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral haemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.