LAM KID - 2013;3(02)

LAM KID

MAY 30, 2013

[Modern medical and dietary treatment of gout in light of the new American guidelines]

SZEKANECZ Zoltán

[After several decades of “silence”, in the past few years a number of new data and treatment options have become available regarding the management of hyperuricaemy and gout. We also have a better understanding of the immunpathogenic processes of the disease, resulting in new medicines, as well as dietary and lifestyle modifications. Finally, in 2012, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has published new guidelines, which provide detailed algorhythms for each stage of gout and for special clinical situations. Although some aspects of clinical practice in Europe are different from that in the US, the new guidelines are applicable - with the necessary adaptations - in Hungary for the efficient treatment of gout and its comorbidities.]

LAM KID

MAY 30, 2013

[The role of diet in the prevention of musculoskeletal diseases]

SPEER Gábor, SPEER Józsefné

[In the European Union, the lowest incidence of osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis has been reported in the Mediterranean area. However, for a long time only a few nutrients’ effects have been studied on BMD. Of these, the favourable effects of wine, fermented cheese and fruit and vegetable consumption have been demonstrated in the alleviation of both osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. A number of promising studies are being conducted with analogues of antioxidant components of the mediterranean diet. Some of these components decrease the levels of pathological factors, such as interleukin-1, -6, -17, TNF-α, JAK2/STAT3, which are the targets of a number of efficient drugs. These findings demonstrate the significance of diet in the development of musculoskeletal diseases. In our review article, we present the above mentioned data, illustrated by some of our own recipes.]

LAM KID

MAY 30, 2013

[A magnézium és csonthatásai]

BAJNOK Éva

[Since 1932, a number of animal studies have demonstrated the correlation of hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia, and the variety of skeletal abnormalities resulting from low magnesium (Mg) intake. Several studies have shown that patients with osteoporosis have a decreased serum magnesium level, which is related to decreased bone mineral content and increased bone fragility. Mg has multiple physiological effects, thus it is not surprising that dozens of hypomagnesaemia-related diseases and symptoms have been reported. Adequate Mg concentration is necessary for the secretion of parathormone and its effect on target organs, activation of vitamin D in the kidney, the maintenance of calcium homeostasis, bone mineralisation and regeneration. Mild hypomagnesaemia is associated with general, atypical symptoms, whereas severe Mg deficiency is a life-threatening condition. Its concentration should be measured in serum and urine. Mg metabolism is determined by its absorption from the intestines and reabsorption in the kidneys. Recently revealed details of these processes give some insights into the mechanisms underlying a number of Mg deficient conditions related to genetic or medical reasons. Mg supplementation may be indicated for patient populations with the highest risk of hypomagnesaemia. For supplementation, the recommended total Mg dose is 350 mg, first in higher doses, several times per day for a longer period, complemented with Ca and K supplementation. Overdosing can only occur in patients with impaired renal function, which necessitates careful monitoring. Adequate Mg supplementation is an inexpensive, safe and effective preventive and therapeutic option for many diseases.]

LAM KID

MAY 30, 2013