Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Providing ambulance paramedics with more in-depth knowledge relating to the on-site treatment of acute cardiac asthma ]

MOSKOLA Vladimír, HORNYÁK István

DECEMBER 10, 2012

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice - 2012;25(06)

[Aim of the study: The authors sought an answer to the questions arising in the course of on-site emergency care, in relation to the treatment of acute cardiac asthma: What is the ratio of men and women developing the disease? How frequently is supplementary, symptomatic treatment applied in the course of on-site emergency care? What is the distribution of the incidence of acute cardiac asthma by age group and time of day? Methodology and sample: The descriptive, retrospective research was conducted at the Nyíregyháza ambulance station of the North Plain Regional Ambulance Service. In the period lasting from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2007, a total of 13 511 incident sheets were reviewed, from among which a total of 130 were subjected to a more detailed examination, on the strength of the diagnoses of acute cardiac asthma and pulmonary oedema. The data was collated using Microsoft Excel, and the processing of the results thus obtained took place using descriptive statistical methods (frequency, correlative coefficient). Results: With regard to acute cardiac asthma, 51% of the cases took place in the early hours, while 40% occurred in the evening. The remaining cases can be placed in the mid-morning and afternoon periods, which together represented only 9% of all the cases. Of the 130 patients studied, 68 were women and 62 were men. Supplementary treatment was given on-site in the form of Cerucal in 17 cases, and with Theospirex in 13% of cases. Conclusions: The incidence of the disease is increasing from year to year. The rise in the incidence of acute cardiac asthma has been especially notable among the 71-81 age group. In terms of the time of day, acute cardiac asthma tends to occur in the early hours and in the evening. Over the age of sixty incidence increases significantly in both sexes; however, age is not a significant factor in the effectiveness of the treatment. ]

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Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Mirror Shards]

ROZSOS Erzsébet

[The author is a nursing ethicist, who reviews the past 18 years of this professional and draws comparisons with a status report published in 1994 by two leading bioethicists, Dr. Béla Blasszauer and Dr. Tibor Jakab. The comparison deals with the issues of the overall situation of nurses, salaries, working conditions, the system of “gratitude payments” (as a phenomenon specific to Hungary), the problems associated with conflicting instructions from doctors, nurses’ lack of autonomy, the lack of recognition, the untenable ratio of patients to nurses, the explicit and implicit divisions among nurses, the unconscionable and frequently changing statutory provisions, the problems related to providing information, the tolerance of a lack of healthcare, the absence of advocacy, and the emerging phenomenon of nurse emigration. It can be inferred from the analysis that if the professional does not succeed in autonomously taking control of its own future, it could lose the moral foundation and status that it has earned in the course of its history.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[A Bridge between the Hungarian and Slovakian nursing - In Memoriam doc. PhDr. Alžbeta Hanzlíková, PhD (1935-2012)]

BETLEHEM József

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[The annual health insurance activity of the physiotherapy procedures related to definition in outpatient care]

MOLICS Bálint, ÁGOSTON István, ENDREI Dóra, ÉLIÁS Zsuzsanna, KRÁNICZ János, SCHMIDT Béla, BONCZ Imre

[Aim of the study: The aim of the study is mapping the extent, prevalence, specialty distribution of physiotherapy procedures in out-patient care and the health insurance expense on provisions. Methodology and sample: The data concerning the number of cases were requested from the Healthcare Strategic Research Institute, Healthcare Detailed Data Base according to the data of National Health Insurance Fund (OEP). Paragraph J17 in Book of Rules on the application of the code list of out-patient activities provided the OENO activity list with the scores, number of cases in 2008, and we obtained the financing expense/year from the 1.46 FT/point score. Results: The total number of cases of 151 physiotherapy activities /year were 24.748.877. The 20 most prevalent procedures accounted for 72.56% (17.958.097) of the total number of cases. The procedures performed by physiotherapists, masseurs, conducters and physiotherapy assisstants accounted for 7.339.446.299 Fts financed by OEP in 2008. Among the BNO main groups, most interventions occured in musculoskeletal and connective tissue diseases. Conclusions: According to results OEP financed 7,339 billion FTs on physiotherapy treatment in out-patient care, mostly in procedures of musculoskeletal disorders in 2008.]

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