Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Hungary is the cradle of Occupational Health Nursing Education ]

HIRDI Henriett Éva1,2,3

DECEMBER 31, 2013

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice - 2013;26(06)

[Aim of the study: To research the origin and story of the Occupational Health Nursing in Hungary, to present the development of the factory nurse institutions which fell into oblivion by this time. Sample and Method: Collect and work up literature sources and legislation systematically issued between 1840 and 1950. Examine extant correspondence and reports of factories, enterprises and finishing-schools functioned before the socialization. The examined issues were the followings: aspects of the selection of those who fill factory nurse scope of activities, their qualification, role and esteem. Results: It was found that factory nurses were not selected out of working women. The first factory nurse course started in 1933 in Budapest. During ten years 150 students fulfilled the two-years full-time course based on the secondary education. Participants of the course had to suit strict admission requirements. Students of the course learnt about health, social, legal and cultural knowledge from noted professionals at that time. Factory nurses performed their activities basically at two locales: inside and outside of the factory. Qualified factory nurses were hold in great honour socially, even their rights were protected by collective agreement. Conclusions: Occupational Health Nurse Education has a 80-years-old history in Hungary, that throw new light upon theories until now about origin of Occupational Health Nursing. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Foglalkozás-egészségügyi Ápolók Európai Szövetsége
  2. Magyar Egészségügyi Szakdolgozói Kamara
  3. Semmelweis Egyetem Doktori Iskola

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Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Christmas Greetings]

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[The health care changes affected the everyday lives of nurses ]

NÉMETH Anikó, BETLEHEM József, LAMPEK Kinga

[Aims of the study: To examine the changes inpatient care nurses had to undergo following the reorganization of health care system during the last few years. Sample and methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in six teaching hospitals of Hungary involving nurses who worked full-time in inpatient care applying self-developed questionnaires between October and December 2010. Results: Nurses had to face many negative events and the feeling of uncertainty during the reorganization, which also affected the self evaluation of their health status. The fear of relocation, reduced salary or losing the job and the worsened psychic status and bad workplace communication are significant. The six-question uncertainty scale can be divided into a promotional and an environmental subscale. Responders expect significant support from their employers, mainly financially. Conclusions: The reorganization of the health care system caused uncertainty by the nurses. ]

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TAKÁCS Péter, PAPP Katalin, RADÓ Sándorné

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KORMOS-TASI Judit, SZABÓ László, GÁCSI Erika

[The obesity is a worldwide problem in all agegroup. In 1998 the WHO gives forth that the obesity is an illness. In Hungary the frequency of obesity today is 7 % at the age of 17. The childhood obesity is a main risk of morbidity in the adulthood. There atre two parts of the prevention: sports and excersises and healthy nutrition. In the health prevention we have to take aim at these two methods, so this is the right way to the successfull results. ]

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