Hypertension and nephrology

[Treatment of hypertension in patients with chronic renal failure]

SZLOVÁK Edina, SZILVESZTER Dolgos1

JUNE 24, 2020

Hypertension and nephrology - 2020;24(03)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33668/hn.24.012

Review

[The prevalence of chronic renal failure and hypertension is steadily increasing worldwide. The risk of possible cardiovascular death in patient with advanced renal failure is greater than the risk of progression to end-stage renal failure. Therefore treating and achieving target blood pressure is important in order to slow renal function decline in parallel with cardiovascular risk reduction. However, guidelines do not specify a single blood pressure target to be achieved in patients with renal failure, but suggest evidence based, reno- and cardioprotective therapy. This paper summarizes the clinical practice of treating hypertension (drug and nondrug treatment, therapeutic algorithm, target value, effectiveness of therapy) in patients with chronic renal failure.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Szent Margit Kórház, II.számú Belgyógyászati Osztály, Budapest

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